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No. of Recommendations: 3
GW Potter
Agree completely. This is why "Dental Insurance" has nothing to do with insurance...it has to do with household cash flow management.

With true insurance, you give up a known small loss (premiums +deductibles) in exchange for avoidance of a catestrophic financial loss. The potential catestrophic loss must be random and unpredictable to the insured. This is how life, property and most important, casualty insurance works. "Dental insurance" has nothing to do with this. Dental loss coverage is limited to an out of pocket max and loss is cost shared to the maximum coverage dollar. This has nothing to do with true insurance and explains why you cannot, over time, receive more in financial benefits than you pay in premiums + deductibles.

The real benefit of "dental insurance" is incentivizing policy holders to get into the dentist's chair on a regular schedule.

BruceM
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No. of Recommendations: 1
OHSU Dental School will do it for $2,500 the last time I looked. Call for current prices.

https://www.ohsu.edu/dental-clinics/periodontal-gum-and-impl...

intercst
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I got the bad tooth genes - first a small mouth, next large teeth and finally lots of dental work despite twice daily brushing since I was 5. I have had 6 or 8 crowns (two teeth have had two) 4 root canals and one implant in 2017. My implant's negotiated price (between dentist and Met Life Dental) was $4,019 of which I had to pay $2,519. If I had not had insurance, my pill would have been closer to $5,000.
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This may not apply to you, Bruce...I had a rear, lower molar pulled a couple of years ago. My dentist said that I was fortunate as the upper molar still covered ½ of the neighboring lower molar (as I was chewing) which would keep it from leaning over time. Thus recommended I not opt for the implant which the surgeon was pushing (he is no longer recommended by her). So far I don't miss it at all.

Bill
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My implant cost 5k and it was also a molar. I hated spending the money but would do it again tomorrow. Teeth are about health, and an implant is like a real tooth. I agree with you about not touching two healthy teeth to find a cheaper option. And besides, wouldn't the cost of doing 2 crowns plus the bridge cost more than an implant? It's a year long process, but it's the best 5k I ever spent.

Good luck!

Vivienne
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OHSU Dental School will do it for $2,500 the last time I looked. Call for current prices.

Thanks for the tip.

I called OHSU and they said they must have a referral and that the referring Dentist must do the final placing and fitting of the crown on the implant. I then spoke to my Dentist at Kaiser who said she's surprised by that, as most Dentists, including those at Kaiser, will not 'share' in the implant completion, which kind of makes sense. The lady I talked to at OHSU didn't sound very interested in scheduling a non-enrolled dental patient.

I've checked two other local Dental offices that advertise for implants, and all have been around $5K, all in.

BruceM
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No. of Recommendations: 3
try medical tourism...Mexico for example
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The Countess is the middle of a long, drawn-out process. Her dentist sent her to an oral surgeon, who removed the old tooth (a rear molar - difficult extraction (?)). Next step (two moths later) was to install the screw part. Eventually she will have the implant installed. I have no idea why it takes such a process. But I am not a dentist. But breath-takingly expensive.

CNC
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No. of Recommendations: 1
About $3k and a year. Take out the bad. Heal. Put in a base. Heal. Put in the top. Heal.
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Just in passing, I received a mailing from the dental insurance outfit I had been using
prior to last year. DW and I changed carriers - the older one is saying how important
dental coverage is.
DW and I agree - but prefer a carrier who actually covers dental costs to at least some degree.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I've simply been paying cash for dental services since dental insurance expired circa 2001.

Replacing a crown last week ---- $1685.



Seattle Pioneer
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No. of Recommendations: 4
Annual dental insurance premium: $900. 50% copay means this combined cost exceeds the cost of pay as you go for the crown. In the years you have only cleanings and X-rays, you will pay much more than pay-as-you-go
Think about it. If you got more in dental benefits than you paid in insurance premiums +copays and deductibles, insurance companies would be going out of business. Do you see any dental insurere going out of business? No? Neither do I.

BruceM
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No. of Recommendations: 4
Bruce you logic applies to all insurance products. Most of us however can not afford the risk to go bare with regard to our homes. That some fools are happy to go bare is the reason lenders require insurance.

Insurance is a money making deal only for the insurance companies. For the insureds it is a risk mitigation instrument.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
GW Potter
Agree completely. This is why "Dental Insurance" has nothing to do with insurance...it has to do with household cash flow management.

With true insurance, you give up a known small loss (premiums +deductibles) in exchange for avoidance of a catestrophic financial loss. The potential catestrophic loss must be random and unpredictable to the insured. This is how life, property and most important, casualty insurance works. "Dental insurance" has nothing to do with this. Dental loss coverage is limited to an out of pocket max and loss is cost shared to the maximum coverage dollar. This has nothing to do with true insurance and explains why you cannot, over time, receive more in financial benefits than you pay in premiums + deductibles.

The real benefit of "dental insurance" is incentivizing policy holders to get into the dentist's chair on a regular schedule.

BruceM
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