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I've been getting a lot of guff because I ask questions for which the answers seem to be either vague, dismissive.
Alternately, I am told that the answer is found in "halacha" as if I am expected to accept that as an answer when I don't find it an answer at all.

I ask questions about conversion, death penalties, diet, etc and am told that the halacha is complete on these issues.

I ask if there is disagreement on halacha on this issues and I am told that only the uninformed would ask such a question.

This seems to come mainly from some who don't think that halacha is a subject of contention.

Worse, at least one person has argued that he knows what is moral because the halacha informs his morality.

As a non-jew who has tried to become informed on these issues, I take offense when just because I ask questions about what seem to be pat answers, I am told that because I don't think that the answer given is really an answer but a statement of belief, I am contentious, and worse.

As I have read as much as time permits on the subject so to be informed, I offer the following concerning a argument about halacha between jews.

I offer no commentary other than the obvious point that I don't think stealing from jews or killing jews is a moral activity.

If anyone wants to take the time that I took to read what is posted on this site and comment, I would appreciate the feedback.




www.cactus48.com/jewishlaw.html -






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I am told that because I don't think that the answer given is really an answer but a statement of belief, I am contentious, and worse.

Maybe this sentence is the key to explaining to you why you are a contentious pain in the rear end.

You ask people about their belief, and all they can tell you is what they believe. There are no absolute truths. There are potentially as many answers as individuals with different world views. Yet you insist, unreasonably, that we as a group must give you a uniform and absolute answer.

You also seem to want to learn nothing from the answers that are given, but rather to just keep badgering as if no answer was given.

Or maybe you just enjoy grating on people's nerves....

Elan
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You ask people about their belief, and all they can tell you is what they believe. There are no absolute truths. There are potentially as many answers as individuals with different world views. Yet you insist, unreasonably, that we as a group must give you a uniform and absolute answer.

Let me try to explain one more time. I ask about halacha. I am told that any question in jewish life can be answered by halach and that halacha is immutable and the absolute source of all wisdom.

But since not everyone agrees what is halacha and what is the absolute wisdom garnered by reading halachais and that this has been so for almost the entire life of the jewish people, I can't understand how halacha can be absolute and immutable.

I have read the history of halacha. I have read how is started, Sanhedren, Mamoinidie, factionalism, tribalism, reunification and interpretation.

And then I ask a question about morality and the answer I get is that the halacha tells us that this is absolutely so because it is the word of god handed down and interpreted over generations but not everyone agrees.


Now I could be wrong on this but near as I can figure- and I know this will offend, this doesn't seem all that different from the numerous schisms in Christianity.

They all have the same book but none can seem to agree on exactly what is the word of god because it is interpreted by humans.

Which makes it hard for me to accept something a being immutable from another religion as being a basis of morality for four basic reasons.

1. Not sure how anyone knows it was written by god.
2. Wheter it was written by god or not, I'm not sure there is a reason to accept it as being moral just because god wrote it.
3. Other people have gods who tell them to do very different things.
4. The god of the jews is the god of the christians and the muslims and they can't even agree on what god wants them to do.


Some who reply insist that their anwer is the only answer because that is halacha. Sometimes that answer has some very shared moral underpinnings. However, for those who accept their version of halacha as being absolute, there are some very disturbing things sanctioned that I do not share the beleif that they are moral.


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You ask people about their belief, and all they can tell you is what they believe. There are no absolute truths. There are potentially as many answers as individuals with different world views. Yet you insist, unreasonably, that we as a group must give you a uniform and absolute answer.

Let me try to explain one more time. I ask about halacha. I am told that any question in jewish life can be answered by halach and that halacha is immutable and the absolute source of all wisdom.


Since you are addressing me, I will point out that I never quoted halacha, never said it is a universal truth, never said it comes from god or is immutable. So as I said above, you attribute to me an opinion I do not have for the sake of vacuous argument.

Good bye.

Elan
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