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May I just say that it sucks to be diabetic?

Regards,
JB

PS - A Charcot in the foot is really really sucky....
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JB;

I've been dealing with it for 30+ years. Ir ain't pretty.

Best regards,
Duane
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It sucks worse not to see your kids grow up. Whatever I am missing out on because of what I have to do to control my diabetes is minor compared to what I might miss out on if I don't.
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I also try to keep it all in perspective. If I'm having a "whoa is me" kinda day, I just think of people who have it way worse. That usually snaps me out of it.

Not to discount having diabetes, either; it takes its toll, mentally and physically.

Try and keep your head up, my fellow Fools!

-TMFKipper
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I have a hard time feeling sorry for myself. I think I did for a few weeks when I was diagnosed but I started thinking about all the positive things in my life. After 3 months, when I had lost 30lbs by cutting out Coke and Cherry Coke, limiting the amount of Pasta I inhaled (Alfredo, I miss you) and paying attention to how I live, I realized I hadn't really given anything significant up. Last month, I got my A1C back down to 6.0 from a 6.4 high last May. The Dr was happy with all my labs (cholesterol was below the normal range), and 10 months into my new twice weekly workouts with a personal trainer, I am feeling pretty good.

Of course, getting some sleep now that Big Brother 8 is over (just one more podcast episode and I am done!) will help as well.

So I guess the short side of my reply is focus on the positives, deal with the negatives, and move forward. To quote Jimmy Buffet: Breath in, Breath out, Move on.

Fuskie
Who has a backlog of articles on diabetes that he needs to get around to posting...
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JB??

Did you just find out? Looks like you, Fuskie and myself have something in common besides the Ask a Foolish Question board. One thing I find a bit frustrating is having someone with Type I post advice to someone with type II. I wish the powers that be in the medical field come up with different names. Anyway, best of look and good to see you!


J.P.
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I need to start using this board more.

What's bugging me lately is that between the Bernstein VirtuallyNoCarb diet and the latest SaturatedFatGuidelines, it seems like the only safe food is a daily small portion of fish, accompanied by a sprig of brocoli. I love that I've lost 50 pounds and look cute in clothes, but it sort of feels like wasting away rather than dieting.

What I mean is this - the various guidelines are sometimes contradictory and hard to reconcile.
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I was diagnosed back in July so it is a rather new diagnosis to me. I still don't know which type I am or if I have to take insulin as so far I'm not but that is subject to change depending on how the drugs and diet changes impact things.

Regards,
JB
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How old are you JB?
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it sort of feels like wasting away rather than dieting.

I am afraid I was rather rude to my insurance-sponsored nutritionist when I was first diagnosed. When she started talking about foods I should not eat, or how to moderate portion size, I balked and said I didn't want to become skin and bones like her. As it turned out, that didn't happen. I did lose weight but was never muscle-bound to begin with. Having spent the last 10 months working out with a trainer doing strength conditioning, 8 years later I feel much better at having a bit of muscle on my limbs.

Fuskie
Who has never followed a formal plan but uses the nutritional knowledge he learned as well as common sense and self-control to manage his diet...
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I turned 32 this past May.

Regards,
JB
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I turned 32 this past May.

Happy Birthday.

Fuskie
Who is old enough for his nephew to have started high school last month...
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Most likely you are type 2. Especially if you don't need insulin yet.
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I hate the "yet" part.
Is it inevitable?

I can accept that I "gave myself" this disease by overeating, but does that mean I'm definitely doomed to eventually have all these horrible problems? I hope not.
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I hate the "yet" part.
Is it inevitable?


Nope it's not inevitable. You could die first. The key is to get in about 50 more years before that happens. (Adust for your own age - I'm 39 so another 50 years would be quite nice)
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I can accept that I "gave myself" this disease by overeating, but does that mean I'm definitely doomed to eventually have all these horrible problems?

You didn't give yourself the disease. Unfortunately, you had the potential in you all the time. You may have been genetically predisposed, especially if there is a history of diabetes in your family. In my case, I think that stress was a strong factor in that I was really not enjoying my job at the time I was diagnosed and there were other factors in my personal life. There are people who overeat and have normal blood glucose processes and insulin levels. And there are diabetics who always thought they had maintained a healthy diet.

While it is true that Type II diabetes is a degenerative disease, with proper diet, exercise and when necessary, medication, we can stave off the effects. Personally, my plan is to never have heart disease, retinopathy, kidney disease, amputation or any other symptom resulting from the metabolic imbalance in my biology. I do not consider myself doomed at all. It is a life long challenge that I will take day by day and when the rules change, I will adapt with a vengeance.

Fuskie
Who decided long ago that there was nothing to be gained by pessimism...
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I can accept that I "gave myself" this disease by overeating, but does that mean I'm definitely doomed to eventually have all these horrible problems?
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You didn't give yourself the disease. Unfortunately, you had the potential in you all the time. You may have been genetically predisposed, especially if there is a history of diabetes in your family.
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My grandmother.
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In my case, I think that stress was a strong factor in that I was really not enjoying my job at the time I was diagnosed and there were other factors in my personal life.
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I was very very skinny all my life, until I hit a five year stretch with marital problems, kids growing up and away, and seeing my mother and brother slowly dying and wasting away to actual skeletons, and my sister grapple with cancer. Stress - you could say that. I stopped taking care of myself for awhile.
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There are people who overeat and have normal blood glucose processes and insulin levels. And there are diabetics who always thought they had maintained a healthy diet.
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Good to know, because self-blame is no fun.
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While it is true that Type II diabetes is a degenerative disease, with proper diet, exercise and when necessary, medication, we can stave off the effects. Personally, my plan is to never have heart disease, retinopathy, kidney disease, amputation or any other symptom resulting from the metabolic imbalance in my biology. I do not consider myself doomed at all. It is a life long challenge that I will take day by day and when the rules change, I will adapt with a vengeance. Fuskie
Who decided long ago that there was nothing to be gained by pessimism...
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My sentiments exactly. I will come back and read that as necessary.
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and the latest SaturatedFatGuidelines

What's that? Oh, saturated fats are bad and evil? Since saturated fats are in meats, I've never met a saturated fat that was not delicious when grilled.

No fat has ever raised my blood sugar and never will, so I do not care how much of them or what type, including transfats, I consume.

My only guideline is what will it do to my blood sugar. So there will never be a new diet that will address my needs any better.
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My only guideline is what will it do to my blood sugar.

I would suggest that you pay attention to what fats will do to your weight. If you are overweight, you need to watch them so you can lose the excess pounds. If you are at a healthy weight, you need to watch them so you don't become overweight.
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I would suggest that you pay attention to what fats will do to your weight. If you are overweight, you need to watch them so you can lose the excess pounds. If you are at a healthy weight, you need to watch them so you don't become overweight.

The idea that fat makes you fat is so last Century. If you are fat, it is the carbs that did it.
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I'll repost this for reference.

http://boards.fool.com/Message.asp?mid=25474484

I didn't mention the 5 glaucoma surgery's I've had nor the recent cataract surgery on my right eye. (I can see again!) Left eye is next!

Am I disco urged and depressed? Hell no! Not as long (with a little bit of help) I can can down on the floor and crawl around with the newest grandson (7 mons.) while the older grandson son (6 yrs) says, "Grampa, you're silly." Life is great, even with.....

Look to the positive; you're still alive.

Best regards,
Duane
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The idea that fat makes you fat is so last Century. If you are fat, it is the carbs that did it.

It's all of it.
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I can can [get] down on the floor and crawl around

This usually happens after a six pack of Mic Ultra or Bud Select.

Fuskie
Who is usually not sure about the alive part in those situations...
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and the latest SaturatedFatGuidelines
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What's that? Oh, saturated fats are bad and evil? Since saturated fats are in meats, I've never met a saturated fat that was not delicious when grilled.
No fat has ever raised my blood sugar and never will, so I do not care how much of them or what type, including transfats, I consume.
My only guideline is what will it do to my blood sugar. So there will never be a new diet that will address my needs any better.
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What about the Times article -
http://tinyurl.com/2qmdla

I may consult the endocrinologist they quote since he's 5 minutes away.
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What about the Times article -
http://tinyurl.com/2qmdla


Articles like that are why I do not read the Times. Since you are given only vague information about this anecdotal patient, you cannot make any conclusions about your own situation. It sounds like just one more pill will make everything work, which is all that most doctors know how to do.

Atkins has many articles about how low carb diets reduce cholesterol. It is usually your response to carbs that causes excessive cholesterol. If this patient actually controlled his blood sugar, than the cholesterol and heart attack risk would fall in line.
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Atkins has many articles about how low carb diets reduce cholesterol. It is usually your response to carbs that causes excessive cholesterol. If this patient actually controlled his blood sugar, than the cholesterol and heart attack risk would fall in line.

---

My cholesterol dropped significantly when I all-but-stopped eating carbs, and I haven't worried about fat at all. So, you may be right. I think the next piece of the puzzle for me is muscle. I've adopted the Bernstein diet, incorporated a daily walk into my life, and lost a lot of weight. But, I need to add upper body muscle. Doesn't a favorable fat/muscle ratio help with glucose metabolism or production or something?
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Hi Duane -

I just had the cataract removed from my 2nd eye this past Monday.
The Opthamologic surgeon told me again that I am "so young to have cataracts"

Wonder if I'd learned a few years ago about the T2 I might have avoided these.

I'm VERY interested in avoiding all of the rest of potential complications.

Best wishes to you and the rest of our fellow posters.

A/L
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Am I disco urged and depressed? Hell no!

My twisted way of looking at this post is that the second question answers the first one on more ways than one! Maybe "disco urged" was a typo, maybe not. If it wasn't, you've got a great sense of humor about our disease! Rock positive Duane!
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Doesn't a favorable fat/muscle ratio help with glucose metabolism or production or something?

It sure does. Muscle can consume glucose without the need for insulin, which is why exercise is a two-edged sword. The general rule of thumb is morning exercise is best since you have all day to manage the variations. Usually exercise causes a drop in blood sugar, however, if your blood sugar is already high, the liver dumps out more and it goes even higher.

The good thing is that the better condition you have the more consistent it becomes.
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Usually exercise causes a drop in blood sugar, however, if your blood sugar is already high, the liver dumps out more and it goes even higher.

If I am understanding this correctly, you're saying exercise actually raises blood sugar? Mine tends to drop after cardio and stays that way for hours. Link please...
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Doesn't a favorable fat/muscle ratio help with glucose metabolism or production or something?
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It sure does. Muscle can consume glucose without the need for insulin, which is why exercise is a two-edged sword. The general rule of thumb is morning exercise is best since you have all day to manage the variations. Usually exercise causes a drop in blood sugar, however, if your blood sugar is already high, the liver dumps out more and it goes even higher.
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so, if your blood sugar is higher in the morning, exercise is likely to push it higher? If that's true, is the best strategy to just ignore that and trust that it's a temporary problem?
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let me throw in 2 cents here. i'm going to go from a type one perspective, but the same issues impact type 2s.

a lot of this depends on what your basal insulin level is. when you are more than casually working out, i'm not talking about gardening here, which the gov't counts as exercise, your muscles are dumping lactate into your blood, and the liver is converting that back to glucose and sending it back to the muscles. this is the so-named Corey cycle. if you have no, or very low, basal insulin, your blood sugar level can rise after exercise because of this, since without insulin your muscles cannot rapidly take up the glucose your liver is synthesizing and releasing. in contrast, if you have a reasonable "basal" level of insulin, your blood sugar will drop after excercise because your muscles take up more than your liver is supplying. if you had a workable pancreas, this would all be balanced out, but you don't so that's where the disconnect is.
your basal insulin is of course impacted by your long-acting insulin, assuming it has been about 8 hrs since you last ate with insulin. so figuring out when in the day that is max-ing and min-ing is helpful in this regard. also if you work out right after you take normal fast-acting insulin, you will crash and burn, that is why of you have some exertion after eating, you need to eat for that as well - your muscles will be sucking up way more glucose than normal.
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if you have no, or very low, basal insulin, your blood sugar level can rise after exercise because of this, since without insulin your muscles cannot rapidly take up the glucose your liver is synthesizing
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which might make it a good idea to take metaformin before exercise, as it increases the ability of cells to use the insulin that's available?
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piney, please be aware that i am not an MD. i don't know much about type 2, but i do have enough education to look into the phamacokinetics and i will get back to you about this. but i will not give you advice, just facts. discuss them with an informed MD. see my earlier post about the scarcity of such animals. if you live near fuskie (s)he seems to have confidence in the beast (s)he consults.
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which might make it a good idea to take metaformin before exercise, as it increases the ability of cells to use the insulin that's available?

There really is no idea of what to expect before exercising.  Metformin will block the liver from releasing glucose and the muscle deficit could cause very low blood sugar.  Only if you measure what happens, without throwing in an unknown, would you be able to have a reasonable chance of predicting what will happen next time.  Exercise can cause a blood sugar drop for a good six hours.

The thing to do is first measure, then exercise, then measure until it stops changing, and write down what happened, then you can objectively decide what changes need to be done.  It is an individual response and no one, not even a doctor, can say what is the best course of action.
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Life as an ongoing science project . . .
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