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Hello FuskieFool and all board members. I saw this on "notable boards" and didn't realize it was here. I've read the last 30 or so posts and noticed some minor misconceptions that I might be able to help with.

I am an Internal Medicine physician in an area of the country where diabetes (Type II) is so rampant it makes up about 50% of my practice. I treat a LOT of Type II diabetics and diagnose or am referred 2-3 new diabetics every week. I'd be glad to give input if wanted and as time allows.

A couple of things to think about first. "Type I" and "Type II" diabetes are just names the definitions of which have changed over time. Type I is typically a child or young adult but can be of any age (I've diagnosed 80-year olds with Type I). The pancreas' beta-islet cells no longer produce enough insulin to control blood glucose levels - these people always require insulin. Type II is more complex physiologically with carbohydrate intolerance and/or insulin resistance and the disease more responsive to a variety of treatments including diet/exercise, oral meds and/or exogenous insulin. Type II's are not all middle-aged, obese people and many are young and of normal weight. Why it develops is not known.

The Hemoglobin A1C ("A1C") blood test, expressed as a percentage, gives your doctor an idea what your average blood sugar level has been over a 3 month period of time. Goal A1C's are 7% or below (7% being roughly about equal to a blood sugar of 140 and going up or down about 20 points for each percentage point higher or lower). Personally, I shoot for as close to 6% as possible in my patients to help minimize long-term "target-organ" damage. Always record your blood sugar readings in a log or on a piece of paper with the time of day of that reading and bring it to your doctor visits so he/she can suggest modifications of therapy as may be needed.

Hope I can be of some help.

ab

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