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Here's a basic Wikipedia explanation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_calendar

and here's a converter:

http://www.stevemorse.org/jcal/julian.html

We're so accustomed to having New Year's on the first of January that it really takes some effort to remember that the New Year started in March. And not even on the first of March, but the 25 of the month.

But it is something that you have to keep in mind if you're going to be working with that period of time. It's why you'll often see two different years given for a birth or death date.

I think between the baptism record and the Julian calendar explanation you'll come up with the answer. I have often noticed, by the way, that an awful lot of people were apparently born on January 1st (in Gregorian terms), and assumed that the minister simply entered all the records for the weeks previous on that date.

Colonial New England did not suffer from lack of ministers. In fact, the place was stuffed with them.

Nancy
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