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Hi all,

I recently bought shares in a company for roughly $17.18 per share. Quicken, however, insists on assuming that my cost-basis is 1/2 what it really is, thus claiming I have a 100% gain in the stock! (Hey, after only a month, I wish that were true! :D )

I know I entered the data for this transaction correctly, but, to be safe, deleted it and entered it again. Same problem. And I can't find a way to manually adjust the cost-basis.


Edit the transaction. Change the number of shares, total cost, and commission as needed. Do NOT change the price per share - when Quicken asks what to calculate, have IT change the price per share.

NEVER enter a price per share in a transaction. Enter the number of shares, total cost (or total sale), and the commission. ALWAYS let Quicken calculate the price per share.

Why?

Because it doesn't really matter.

The dollar total has to balance against dollars somewhere else. (And let me tell you, it's annoying when a program won't let you complete what you're doing because it's out of balance by $0.004. Particularly if the program won't show you more than two decimal places.)

The number of shares must, in the end (when you liquidate), balance to zero. (Quicken used to be willing to handle fractional shares internally at more detail than it would permit a transaction to be created. That's apparently no longer an issue with Q2005. But it was at least as much of a problem as those four tenths of a cent.)

The price per share never has to balance against anything. WHO CARES if it's off by 4/10 of a cent?

(Neither does the commission, for that matter. And the odds are that the amount of noise in the price over five minutes of the market being open is larger than the commission, unless you're running tiny positions or at an expensive brokerage. But still, you do know exactly what the commission was.)
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