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2017 Honda Civic.

I've already had one injector cleaning done by the dealer service center. But now we've moved to a small town, and got a local mechanic, whom I've hit it off with.

I asked him, about injector cleanings. They're not in the owners manual, and a web search says some say it's BS, some that you have to do it.

He sat down with me and said, "They're both right. You can avoid it by buying middle grade fuel from a high volume gas station (less water, more octane) and adding a cleaner to the fuel every ten fill-ups. Buy the lowest grade, and I'll be happy to clean your injectors, and get a very nice profit in the process."

He's got a personal vehicle with 240K miles on the engine, so I think that gives him some cred.

What do you think?

Paul
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What do you think?

I buy Top Tier gasoline and skip the injection cleaning recommendations.
https://www.toptiergas.com/FAQConsumer/

AAA did a report on Top Tier gasoline versus non-Top Tier.
https://newsroom.aaa.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Fuel-Qua...

"Putting additives into the vehicles gas tank can never be as exact as the mixing procedures done at the refinery, nor can the consumer know exactly what levels of which additives are already in the fuel, so
after-market additives are an unnecessary risk that may have detrimental rather than positive effects."
https://engagedscholarship.csuohio.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?r...

I drove my Toyota Highlander for 217k miles on regular Top Tier gasoline without ever getting the injectors cleaner. I didn't notice any dropoff in performance or miles per gallon.

PSU
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204k miles on my 2006 Civic hybrid... haven't done a single thing to the fuel system the entire time, and the gas has typically come from Shell (early in its life) or Circle K + Costco (since 2015).
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Not specifically Honda, but ages ago, for our 2006, 2007 vehicles, Ford/Honda, our now retired mechanic told us to occasionally to either add Techroline to a tank or just buy a tank of Chevron to clean things up, so when traveling, I generally hit a Chevron station, but it's also available as an add-in from most auto parts shops.. There may be other additives to do the same job, never looked..
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The top tier list includes almost all major oil companies.

A few of the highway truck stops are listed too, but many of those seem to be missing.

The message seems to be buy from the majors when you can.
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If I remember, Costco gas is Top Tier, our fav retailer...

Yes it is:

https://www.costco.com/fuel-promise.html
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buying middle grade fuel

Oddly enough, the only vehicles that are factory-specified to use mid-grade gasoline are the ones with 2005 and newer Chrysler Hemi engines. That seems like a very narrow slice of the market to justify a third fuel option at every pump. I have one, and I use mid-grade gas.

When I had an '86 Vette, I learned that it was prone to injector clogging. Through experimentation, I also learned that Chevron with Techron fuel injector cleaner was the only one that worked well in that car. I use that in my Hemi, but very infrequently.

Neil
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I drive an old 1992 Toyota Camry that I purchased many moons ago that had 140,000 miles on it. It now has 315,000 miles on it. (yeah, yeah I'm a cheapskate. A car is merely transportation to me. I consider buying a vehicle like an appliance)
I buy my gas at bargain outlets. My burg is located 50 miles north of El Paso where they have a Western Refining Inc.* refinery.
One day 10 or 15 years ago when I was filling up a Western refinery tank truck was filling the store tanks at the station. I sauntered over to talk with the driver. I asked the driver whether he serviced name brand gasoline stations eg Chevron, Shell. He said yes. From the same tank load? I inquired. Yep he said.
I've never had any injector problem with my vehicle. YMMV



*https://www.oilmonster.com/company/western-refining-inc/4113...
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I asked the driver whether he serviced name brand gasoline stations eg Chevron, Shell. He said yes. From the same tank load? I inquired. Yep he said.

But you didn't ask him if he supplemented any of the name brands with additives. Just sayin'.
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But you didn't ask him if he supplemented any of the name brands with additives. Just sayin'.

There used to be a person here who thought the truck driver carried jugs of additives in the tanker to add at the station. That isn't what happens.

Now the tanker in question may have several compartments where different gasoline are loaded in each one.

PSU
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There used to be a person here who thought the truck driver carried jugs of additives in the tanker to add at the station. That isn't what happens.

Now the tanker in question may have several compartments where different gasoline are loaded in each one.

PSU



" I asked the driver whether he serviced name brand gasoline stations eg Chevron, Shell. He said yes. From the same tank load? I inquired. Yep he said."

The driver may have misunderstood me but I believe it was clear I was asking if the gasoline was the exact same gasoline for no brand or branded gasoline. He could have be shining me on I suppose.

What I suspect though is that an injector cleaning additive likely has negligible cost and can be added at the refinery.
Possibly an additive could be added at a branded station after the storages tanks are filled I suppose.

I dunno. My current method of buying the cheapest gasoline appears to be working; so I am sticking with it.
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What I suspect though is that an injector cleaning additive likely has negligible cost and can be added at the refinery.
Possibly an additive could be added at a branded station after the storages tanks are filled I suppose.


All gasoline has detergents. Top Tier has more than non-Top Tier. Additives are not added at the station.

PSU
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The OP was about whether fuel injectors should be cleaned periodically. Seems like the opinion is divided on the internet. Personally I would check the car's manual to see if it was recommended. If not, I wouldn't do it. Car manufacturers don't require branded gasoline use either; so I use the cheapest gasoline available. Of course, if periodic fuel injector cleaning or using branded gasoline gives one peace of mind; then do it. The additional cost is likely negligible tp the lifetime cost of a vehicle.

Did a quick perusal on the internet on branded vs non branded and came up with these links.
Everyone has their own preference and I don't expect to change anyone's mind. Happy Motoring Everyone.

March 2007 news article.
https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Business/story?id=2978563&pag...
Generic vs. Brand-Name Gas: Are They Different?
With the help of the Maryland State Comptroller, ABC News compared gas from a name-brand Mobil station and a generic Liberty station right across the street from each other.

At the Maryland Fuel Testing Laboratory, chemists conducted a battery of tests. First, they verified that gas was formulated correctly for the season. Then, they checked for contaminants, like excessive sediment or diesel, accidentally mixed with the gasoline.

They also ran the gas through an elaborate engine to make sure it got the 87 octane level people pay for. Both samples easily met state standards.

When gasoline arrives at regional distribution centers, it's all the same. Different gas station chains then buy the raw fuel and add their own blend of detergents. In the past, there might have been more of a difference between different brands of regular unleaded, but these days the EPA requires that all gas contain a minimum amount of detergent to keep car engines clean.

If you're paying for a particular brand of gasoline, "you would be paying more for brand loyalty, primarily," Crawford said. "Some people feel more comfortable dealing with a particular brand."

"The generic, no, will not do harm at all," Crawford said. "I use the lowest price. It makes no difference what the brand is."

Bob Crawford, who works at the lab.


Wholesale distributor
https://kendrickoil.com/branding/the-differences-between-bra...
Branded fuel
Gas sold under a major brand name like Shell, Phillips 66, Alon, or Valero are known in the industry as branded fuel. This kind of gas comes from terminals that handle that specific brand. The basic product itself is the same that goes to unbranded retailers, with one major difference: an “additive” package.

Branded fuels have additive packages added to the basic gas. Take Phillips 66’s Performance Fuel as an example. The EPA requires all gas to have a detergent additive added to help keep engines and emissions cleaner. Phillips 66 adds triple the required amount of detergent additive to produce a gasoline that cleans any deposits formed by the intake process. This branded gas makes the engine perform better, prolonging its effective life, and helps reduce emission levels, making for a greener car.

The additives are added in small amounts to the gas delivered to a retailer. For a consumer, this small amount may or may not have the advertised effect on a particular engine or fuel system. However, the fuel brand spends plenty on advertising to convince the consumer that it will.


August 2013 news story
https://www.businessinsider.com/no-reason-not-to-use-cheap-o...
The only difference between the products is that name-brand stations like Mobil and Shell may put extra engine-cleaning additives in theirs.

But, automotive engineering experts at AAA told us, using generic gas won't harm your engine in any way, and it has its own cleaning additives:

“While it may seem generic gas is too good to be true and not the best option for your vehicle, unbranded fuel should not damage an engine," AAA said in an email.

In 2012, the fuels market manager for Shell told Edmunds, "We really believe that are differences in fuels. We can see it, feel it and measure it."

But Consumer Reports comes down on the side of generic gas.
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As someone already mentioned upthread, I buy almost all my gasoline at Costco and it is a Top Tier gasoline.

PSU
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