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Over a year, according to the video, Hornsea One will produce enough clean electricity to meet the needs of 1 million homes in the United Kingdom. This is electricity that will not create or add to the problems of climate change.

The location of this wind farm is in the North Sea off the coast of England. Its total capacity will be up to 6 gigawatts (GW) and already began supplying power to the UK’s national electricity grid in 2019.

The completion of the Hornsea One is slated for sometime in 2020, at which point it will have a total of 174 turbines.


and

Each rotation of just one wheel equals enough electricity to power one home for one full day.

How far we have come in such a short time.

https://cleantechnica.com/2020/01/20/hornsea-one-will-power-...
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Hornsea One will produce
...
total capacity will be
...
at which point it will have


Operative word = will

We'll see.
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DD: Operative word = will

We'll see.


The windmills at Tehachapi. CA have been there for years (Decades?) and they seem to mostly be working, although when we drive by, some are what the Countess and I call"lazy" - not moving. I have no idea how much power they deliver, but the machines are smaller than the newer ones. (Found a site that says 4639 MW of generators are there. How much is delivered I didn't find.)

There are complaints about birds being killed. They seem to be moving so slowly, one would think the birds could easily dodge the blades, but I am told the tips are actually moving rather fast.

CNC
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Anyone who doubts that UK will be getting more electricity from wind in the future is just pi$$ing in the wind and all over themselves!

In the third quarter of 2019, the UK’s windfarms, solar panels, biomass and hydro plants generated more electricity than the combined output from power stations fired by coal, oil and gas ...

Over the past year, the most significant reason for rising renewable generation has been an increase in capacity as new offshore windfarms have opened. The 1,200 megawatt (MW) Hornsea One project was completed in October, becoming the world’s largest offshore windfarm. The 588MW Beatrice offshore windfarm was completed in Q2 of this year.

These schemes add to the more than 2,100 MW of offshore capacity that started operating during 2018. Further capacity is already being built, including the 714 MW East Anglia One project that started generating electricity this year and will be completed in 2020.

https://www.carbonbrief.org/analysis-uk-renewables-generate-...

jaagu
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The windmills at Tehachapi. CA have been there for years (Decades?) and they seem to mostly be working... There are complaints about birds being killed... CNC

In fact, wind turbines are killing our raptors to the point of extinction - and breeding cannot keep up. Anywhere where you have wind turbines kiss your raptors good bye. For bats specifically, you don't need the blade to actually strike the animal. The pressure created by the blade as it turns, causes the bat lungs to explode. See "Wind turbines make bat lungs explode" -- https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14593-wind-turbines-m...


-=Ajax=-
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This is great.

But I always have to wonder about those who cover this type of technology.

Over a year, according to the video, Hornsea One will produce enough clean electricity to meet the needs of 1 million homes in the United Kingdom.

I wonder what would happen over TWO years. I'm guessing that it would produce enough clean electricity to meet the needs of the same million homes. And over a week? or over a month?
Probably (on average) the same million homes.
Does the time period for the average have to be a year due to seasonal variations? Then say that.

Mike
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...Hornsea One will produce enough clean electricity to meet the needs of 1 million homes in the United Kingdom.
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I have a problem with these kind of statements.

Are the residents of those million homes told they can only use electricity during the variable 40% of the time that the wind blows enough in the North Sea? Are they going to be told that 60% of the time, their houses will be dark, their TVs and refrigerators won’t work, and their cell phones won’t charge?

No, of course not, because that’s not the way the power grid works. When the wind dies down in the North Sea, a land-based natural gas fired power plant will ramp up to make sure those customers have 24/7 electricity service.

But the wind power advocates will never tell the public about the natural gas part. The public ends up thinking the wind farm is all that is needed to provide constant electricity to their homes.

The truth is more complicated than the simplistic statements written in these news articles. But it is effective marketing, I suppose. The larger problem is that the politicians end up believing in the marketing, too, and start making "100% renewable energy" mandates for some future time.

- Pete
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"Hornsea One will produce enough clean electricity to meet the needs of 1 million homes in the United Kingdom."


The quoted statement is incomplete and/or somewhat inaccurate. But, we're talking about a short article aimed at the general public and I'm sure the author didn't want to get bogged down in details, rather just to give an idea of the scale of the farm's capacity.


I have a problem with these kind of statements...When the wind dies down in the North Sea, a land-based natural gas fired power plant will ramp up to make sure those customers have 24/7 electricity service.


Your statement is also incomplete and/or somewhat inaccurate. A natural gas plant firing up isn't the only potential or likely source all the time for fulfilling demand when the Hornsea offshore wind farm is not cranking out to its full capacity. The Hornsea will be attached to the UK grid, and the grid operators will chose whichever source(s) is the best fit for demand at any given moment that Hornsea isn't producing max output. Those sources could be include other offshore wind farms from distant locations in the UK, or perhaps nuclear power from France, or from one of the existing or planned nuclear plants in the UK. Yes, it could come from a natural gas plant, but that's hardly the only option.
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A natural gas plant firing up isn't the only potential or likely source all the time for fulfilling demand when the Hornsea offshore wind farm is not cranking out to its full capacity.
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Natural gas may not be the only backup source, but it is the most likely to be used. Natural gas is by far the largest generator of electricity in the UK. The next largest is domestic nuclear, but those plants are usually run at max output for baseload power. The next after that is wind, but wind power is not dispatchable. I've never heard of any grid operator trying to run it as dispatchable. Just like solar, the grid takes whatever wind produces.

https://www.iea.org/data-and-statistics/data-tables?country=...

Look at the following from the UK national grid. The power source that is ramped up and down to meet demand is CCGT (combined cycle gas turbines). CCGT plants are constructed just for that purpose. Nuclear just sits at the bottom, more or less constant for baseload. Look at the Today and Yesterday graphs, and also the monthly charts.

https://gridwatch.co.uk/

- Pete
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Are the residents of those million homes told they can only use electricity during the variable 40% of the time that the wind blows enough in the North Sea? Are they going to be told that 60% of the time, their houses will be dark, their TVs and refrigerators won’t work, and their cell phones won’t charge?

No, of course not, because that’s not the way the power grid works. When the wind dies down in the North Sea, a land-based natural gas fired power plant will ramp up to make sure those customers have 24/7 electricity service.

Pete


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That dependence on gas fired power plants will no increase. Currently 40% clean electricity is better than 40% dirty coal electricity 10 years ago. Look at how fast UK is changing.

In the future UK will be 80% clean electricity with energy storage included. In addition to wind, UK will have solar PV, energy efficiency, micro grids and other grid upgrades to greatly reduce the need for gas fired power plants.

jaagu
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