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http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/04/05/6413951-how-...

How radiation will change Japan

<snip>
Radiation experts are painting a sobering picture of the Fukushima nuclear disaster's long-term impact on Japan in a series of reports published today by the journal Nature. At best, the country faces more than a decade of expensive cleanup, including the decommissioning of the reactor complex and the disposal of contaminated debris. At worst, wide areas of land around the complex will have to be abandoned, as they were in Ukraine after Chernobyl.

"On the basis of the Fukushima data so far, it seems likely that in some areas, food restrictions could hold for decades, particularly for wild foodstuffs such as mushrooms, berries and freshwater fish.....

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(in my earlier post about inspecting Japanese fish, I had seen an ABC world news report that said tuna swim from Japan over the pacific into the N. Pacific areas of North America where they are caught and of course we eat them)
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tuna swim from Japan over the pacific into the N. Pacific areas of North America where they are caught and of course we eat them

Perhaps we should be investing in personal geiger counters one can bring to the fish store (investing personally and in the stock market sense).

=alstro, fixed wild Pacific salmon for dinner tonight for my daughter & me =8^0
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I don't think you have to worry about N. American salmon. I just thought people who eat tuna may want to know that they travel across the Pacific...I didn't know that.
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tuna

Takes us about 6 months to eat up a 6-pack of small cans of tuna these days--too much tuna salad in childhood, too much tuna casserole in early adulthood. (I had never even heard of tuna casserole before my college boyfriend's mother served it on my first visit. But I then created my own crazy version: rotini instead of egg noodles, one can cream of mushroom and one can cheddar cheese soup, a large bag of frozen peas to a pound of pasta, a good 2/3+ cup of toasted wheat germ--and 1/3+ cup of sherry(!). Before I knew how to cook many things, I think I fixed this monstrosity at least every other week.

Speaking of tuna, I eat sushi (including tuna) about once a month. It's a favorite summer dinner or anytime lunch. I'm lucky to currently live near a cheap Japanese grocery/cafe on the Columbia campus. I haven''t liked their cooked food so far, but their sushi is fine.

I cook fresh tuna maybe 2 or 3 times a year, generally in hot weather. (This was the first meal I ever made on our RV about 4 years ago. Good times!) I dip the tuna steak in soy sauce and then in sesame seeds, then sear so it remains raw in most of the middle, and serve with boiled edamame (soybeans in the pod) and soba (Japanese buckwheat noodles) topped with fine strips of nori (sushi seaweed), chopped scallion, and some sweet gyoza sauce (Japanese dumpling sauce, which I make as it's so easy: soy sauce, rice vinegar, sesame oil, mirin, agave syrup). With wasabi on the side for the tuna--or heck, for the noodles! I make enough for leftovers. Sushi-quality tuna is very expensive (like $25+/lb, a little less on sale) and I buy 2/3 pound, which is enough for dinner and lunch the next day. So it's an occasional treat.
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"Speaking of tuna, I eat sushi (including tuna) about once a month. It's a favorite summer dinner or anytime lunch. I'm lucky to currently live near a cheap Japanese grocery/cafe on the Columbia campus. I haven''t liked their cooked food so far, but their sushi is fine." - alstromeria


We make sushi rolls when Linda and her daughters, Heather and Erin, visit. It's great fun. I also sometimes make sushi rolls on Friday nights. I use whatever fish, shrimp, or fake crab meat I have available. I've even been so desparate that I've made sushi rolls with canned tuna! I sliver up red bell pepper, green onion, carrot, cucumber, avocado, etc. I cook sticky sweet rice and then add vinegar and sugar, and then we roll it up on roasted Nori seaweed paper and put whatever we want in the middle. We make a big to-do when we all get going!

We also make egg rolls and spring rolls sometimes and Heather made crab rangoons one time. I buy Mae Ploy Sweet Thai chili sauce at the Oriental grocery store to put on our egg rolls. We mix wasabi from powdered wasabi we buy at the Asian grocery store. We mix it with soy sauce for our sushi rolls. We also mix wasabi with mayonaise to put on our sushi rolls. It's a big production and we make a huge mess but we have fun.

Artie
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<<Takes us about 6 months to eat up a 6-pack of small cans of tuna these days--too much tuna salad in childhood, too much tuna casserole in early adulthood. (I had never even heard of tuna casserole before my college boyfriend's mother served it on my first visit. But I then created my own crazy version: rotini instead of egg noodles, one can cream of mushroom and one can cheddar cheese soup, a large bag of frozen peas to a pound of pasta, a good 2/3+ cup of toasted wheat germ--and 1/3+ cup of sherry(!). Before I knew how to cook many things, I think I fixed this monstrosity at least every other week.>>



I just made my own version of Tuna Noodle Casserole a week ago. It was great! I suspect thew key is to come up with a version you like to make and eat, just as you suggest.

I looked through an on line list of recipes until I found one that was appealing. I do that often when I want to try a new dish and it usually is a good strategy for me.



Seattle Pioneer
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