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Cilantro (Coriander sativum) is really two herbs in one. The leaves, called cilantro or Chinese parsley, impart a musky, citrus-like (some even say "soapy") flavor to Mexican, Chinese, and Thai cooking.

The tiny, round seeds, called coriander, taste of sage and lemon or orange peel, and season many traditional Indian dishes, especially curries.

Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) is really two herbs in one. The leaves, called cilantro or Chinese parsley, impart a musky, citrus-like (some even say "soapy") flavor to Mexican, Chinese and Thai cooking. The tiny, round seeds, called coriander, taste of sage and lemon or orange peel, and season many traditional Indian dishes, especially curries.

Coriander roots also have culinary use. In Southeast Asia, they are dug, chopped, and added to salty pickled condiments by many kitchen gardeners.

This easy-to-grow herb is rich in vitamins A and C, and also contains iron and calcium. In the garden, coriander flowers attract beneficial insects. At the flowering and fruit-set stage, the plants give off a slightly acrid smell, which is probably why this herb's botanical name is derived from the Greek word for bedbug, which emits a similar odor. In mature seeds, this odor vanishes.

Some people find the unique smell and taste of fresh cilantro unpleasant, but those of this opinion is definitely in the minority because the herb's popularity has skyrocketed in recent years. Cilantro enthusiasts eagerly eat the leaves raw, chopped into salsas or salads, and layered onto sandwiches.

Cilantro is essential in Pad Thai Thailand's best-known noodle dish - a delicious, spicy-sweet mix of rice noodles, tofu, shrimp or chicken, and eggs, flavored with fish sauce, garlic, chilies, and ginger (in addition to cilantro), and topped with peanuts. When used as a topping for rice noodles or in Oriental dipping sauces, cilantro and roasted peanuts often are chopped together.

Source of Article: https://gardenfrontier.com/how-to-grow-cilantro-in-6-easy-st...
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Cilantro is hard to grow in summer as it bolts quickly in the heat, and once it bolts, the leaves don't taste as good IMO. I find it easier to keep alive indoors in summer.

I live in the Low Country (central SC coast), and cilantro grows well outdoors for me in early to mid spring and mid to late fall. It's periodically too cold here in winter to keep alive then, either.

However, parsley, rosemary, and thyme do well all year here--and basil, dill, oregano, and chives spring through fall. Herbs are so pricy, and usually sold in sub-optimal amounts, so I like growing my own. I used to grown my own mesclun leaves, but...got older & lazier. Too much bending ;-) I should consider growing my own cherry tomatoes though--I especially love those nutty-tasting yellow ones.
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Cilantro is hard to grow in summer as it bolts quickly in the heat, and once it bolts, the leaves don't taste as good IMO. I find it easier to keep alive indoors in summer.

FWIW, down here in the “Gulf South”, cilantro along with dill, parsley and green onions are one of our “winter herbs”. Ours has bolted and set seeds. The parsley and dill is in bloom and I’m harvesting the bunching onion bulbs and garlic this week. I’ll use some of the almost dry seeds in my pickling mix for my “cold water” dill pickles.

Up north at the Jersey shore, parsley was a bi-annual along with chives. Dill was a cool weather herb, which would bolt in the late spring just about the time that the cucumbers were starting to produce, just like down here. That proves to me that God is an engineer not a gardener.
;-)

C.J.V. - retired enjineer & active gardener, me
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