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My blood sugar is climbing. I'm not diabetic yet, but there seems to be a prediabetic disposition.

I'm thirsty but don't want to drink.

And I just can't stay away from chocolate/sweets. I don't eat them all day, but about once a day I just have to have sugar. I'm sure it's because I'm insulin resistant.

Cereal in the morning is sure to cause a headache.

Ditto potatoes at any time of the day.

Atkins diet doesn't suit because the meat makes my hormones go berserk. (I'm perimenopausal.)

Anyone managed to turn things around with diet before and avoid adult-onset diabetes?

I'd appreciate tips.

Jo Anne
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First, go see a doctor. You may be sure you are insulin resistent, but a proper diagnosis is the first step towards developing a comprehensive treatment plan.

Fuskie
Who does not recommend entering into diabetic diets without appropriate medical supervision...
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First, go see a doctor. You may be sure you are insulin resistent, but a proper diagnosis is the first step towards developing a comprehensive treatment plan.

Okay, maybe I didn't make myself clear. I've seen a doctor. I've been going to a doctor regularly and getting regular blood tests because my blood sugar is rising.

The doctor is working slowly and I'm not there yet. I'm asking whether others have had success turning it around.

Who does not recommend entering into diabetic diets without appropriate medical supervision...


I have medical supervision. We're just not at the "medical diet" stage yet. He just suggested I lose weight. Didn't say how.

Jo Anne
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Well, for one thing stop the chocolates. Stop the sugar sodas. Start walking. Park on the far end of the parking lot. In your OP, you listed what you can not do, so list what you can do.

Let's try an exercise. List what you had for breakfast, lunch and dinner over the last week. Include snacks. Also list the exercise you have had over the last week. Include simple things like stairs you have taken or the distance to your office. How tall are you and how much do you weigh? What is your target weight? Also, how old are you?

Fuskie
Whose mother told him never to ask the last question but it is pertinent...
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Re: Atkins style diets (low carb, high protein):

Meat is not the only option. If large quantities of meat are a problem, try textured vegetable protein and the dread and dreaded tofu. Also, try the occasional can of tuna or slab of fresh fish.

Breakfast suggestion: Instead of packaged cereal, try oatmeal with salsa (not sugar). If that gives you a headache, try 50-50 oatmeal and TVP with salsa (not sugar). i've had success with TVP, oatmeal, and wheat bran in a ratio of 2:1:1, but i only recommend that mix to fanatics and those who have qualified for Raw Bits.

cassandra
55, type 2 diabetes, controlled by one pill per day

/**/
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Atkins diet doesn't suit because the meat makes my hormones go berserk. (I'm perimenopausal.)


I am curious about this. I am also perimenopausal and follow a low carb eating plan. We have access to meat (elk, pork, chicken and beef) that are raised hormone free, but I am not eating much more meat than I was prior to changing the way I eat. I am eating LOTS more vegetables and some fruit. It really does help control both carb cravings and my bg levels. (I do use soy products regularly on religious days of abstinence.)

There are other versions of low carb eating plans around besides Atkins. My favorite is Protein Power by the Drs. Eades. Both Protein Power and Protein Power Lifeplan have wonderful explanations of the eating plan and the effects of different nutrients on our bodies.

Susan
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If that gives you a headache, try 50-50 oatmeal and TVP with salsa (not sugar). i've had success with TVP, oatmeal, and wheat bran in a ratio of 2:1:1, but i only recommend that mix to fanatics and those who have qualified for Raw Bits.


Thanks, this is helpful. Oatmeal does give me a headache, even unsweetened.

This sounds like the way I prefer to eat anyway. I can't do the fish or cheeses too much either, but I can do tofu and I don't dread it.

I don't know what Raw Bits are. Oh, well.

Jo Anne
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There are other versions of low carb eating plans around besides Atkins. My favorite is Protein Power by the Drs. Eades. Both Protein Power and Protein Power Lifeplan have wonderful explanations of the eating plan and the effects of different nutrients on our bodies.


Thank you for the recommendations. I know low carbing works, but I need alternatives to the meats/poultry/fish. This helps a lot.

Jo Anne
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I don't know what Raw Bits are. Oh, well.

Raw Bits is a mythical breakfast cereal and sponsor of Prairie Home Companion, a cereal composed of oat hulls and wheat chaff.

cassandra
Qualified, but would never eat the stuff.

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Raw Bits is a mythical breakfast cereal and sponsor of Prairie Home Companion, a cereal composed of oat hulls and wheat chaff.



Mmmmmmmmm.

Jo Anne
<whinny>
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"N other thing, fruit & veggies DO reduce carb cravings a ton. And, Hood makes low carb dairy stuff that will let you lay off chocolate. If you still can't do without chocolate, try the Russell Stover Low Carb sweets. They're in red packages and are very low carb & good. Wal-Mart carries them on one of the candy aisles and w/dietary froods in the grocery section of super stores.

JF-
type 2 diabetic for 3 years - insulin to one pill a day to fully diet controlled.

ps - American Diabetes Association (www.ada.org)has a diet plan. Also, try your local library for their cooksbooks.
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sorry about lousy typing
JF
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"I'd appreciate tips.

Jo Anne"

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Diet can assist but I find that exercise on a regular basis is a requirement. The doctor can prescribe meds that will control blood sugar but if you can keep it in line without resorting to meds you'll do better.

I am diabetic - type 2 so I did not keep from the disease - but I have kept blood sugar in control with diet and exercise.
By regular exercise - I walk anywhere from 3 to 5 miles every other day and try to do something different on off days when scheduling allows.

Everyone is an individual and so what exercise is OK for one person will be too much or too little for another. Talk to your doctor. Ask him or her to suggest a nutritionist - a suitable exercise goal.

Stay away from fruit juices and sweetened sodas. Welcome most fruits - the nutritionist I started with said only watermellon was an out and out no-no. Welcome basically all vegetables.

You do not need to start grazing but steamed green beans and broccoli, and asparagus are easy to fix and you can eat your fill.

Alcohol is something to avoid - but moderation in virtually all things ------ well most things ---- is a good policy.


Genetics does also play a role - a significant role.
Diabetes runs in families.


Good luck and I hope the comments help more than hinder.

Howie52,
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Everyone has been so helpful.

This weekend I flew home and got a second opinion from my old family doctor who said that not only do I not have diabetes, my blood sugar doesn't indicate that I'm going to get diabetes. She said that I was probably insulin resistive and suggested I see an endocrinologist about getting glucophage (sp?).

Any thoughts on that?

Jo Anne
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IMO and I will type that again IMO
you have a very good family doctor...
Seems to be there is a big push to get people on drugs these days...

Seems to me that it more about money than good health...

JMO

RR

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Glucophage is effective for insulin resistance, but is also frequently used for other non-diabetic reasons such as Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and anovulation, both of which can be part of Syndrome X. Many women who have trouble conceiving are given glucophage (metaformin)and are soon thereafter pregnant.

Susan
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Many women who have trouble conceiving are given glucophage (metaformin)and are soon thereafter pregnant.



Hmmm. This could get interesting.

Jo Anne
<wouldn't mind doing it all over again in her 50s!>
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Yes, get a 3rd opinion. When 2 opinions are totally opposite of each other - don't just take the one you want to hear, get a third one.

C.
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