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No. of Recommendations: 3
I do the same with water chestnuts.

AC *and yes they makes a nice appetizer*
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Pellet grills, except for the fact that they have grills in them that you can put food on, are really just ovens. If you put a meat loaf in a pan in it, cook it at 350, it's an oven.

Put bread dough in there on a sheet pan at 375 for an hour, you get a loaf of bread.

The easiest option would be to do ribs, either StLouis or back loin pork ribs.
Sprinkle them with a rub you like or just salt/pepper/garlic. Cook them in the pellet unit for 3 hours at 250.

or chicken parts at 375 for :45 to :60 minutes.

Remember, it's just an oven with a choice of flavorful fuels.
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I go with a pork butt when breaking in a new BBQ
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Having discussions with SIL over what to try. Thought this very experienced group might care to share some ideas and what they might be cooking up (or would want to). . .

As sano posted, that pellet grill is just an oven in which one can add smoke for flavor. To get a better idea on what to cook, we would need to know how many people you would cook for, their rough ages, dietary restrictions if any, etc., etc.

A number of years ago, there was a discussion on this board about Qing boneless pork loins “low & slow”. Most folks suggested that there wasn’t enough internal fat in the loin and it would come out tough & dry. I wasn’t convinced but was willing to try a stuffed pork loin. I cut a hunk of the loin about 1.5 or 1.25 pounds in weight and sliced an X through the center with my knife. I marinated it overnight in a mixture of a little creole seasoning and a couple of table spoons of maple syrup in the fridge. I then stuffed about a half pound of Jimmy Dean maple flavored breakfast sausage into the X I cut through the center of the loin. I smoked it for around 3 hours or so in my old ECB-type water smoker. Came out quite good if I say so myself (DW said that I could do it again any time I wanted, her).
;-)

Since both you & SIL are not experienced with the grill, you may want to try a mixture of say pork and lamb, chicken, meat loaf, etc. for a taste test. If you mix chicken with other meats, you might want to segregate it from the other stuff.
;-)

C.J.V. - might even do fresh seafood on that thing, me
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No. of Recommendations: 5
These are usually done on a grill but can also be done in an oven as in this recipe;

Angels on Horseback
See https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/216457/angels-on-horseback... .

The same idea can be used with shrimp and/or divers scallops. I have had them at festivals in south Loosiana both with oysters and also shrimp. One trick is to pre-cook (fry) the bacon until it is about half cooked but still able to be wrapped around the seafood item so that the oyster is not overcooked by the time the bacon gets crisp.
;-)

C.J.V. - would make a good appetizer methinks
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No. of Recommendations: 3
I do the same with water chestnuts.

AC *and yes they makes a nice appetizer*
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Having discussions with SIL over what to try. Thought this very experienced group might care to share some ideas and what they might be cooking up (or would want to). I have no pellet cooker experience but happy to try most anything.

So tell us Lakedog, what did y’all cook? How did it turn out, etc., etc.? Inquiring minds want to know.
;-)

C.J.V. - and me too
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Mr. Voelkels,

We decided to try a brisket, which is really what my SIL wanted to do. He picked up a 12 pounder. Used a rub that came with the CampChef. Had him coat it the night before and wrap it in plastic overnight. Based on the weight, the info we had suggested about 10 hours to cook so he put it on at 5 am when one of the boys (8 month old twins) got him up for a feed. I suggested 225 degrees, but he started it at 250 based on the instructions with the Camp Chef. It cooked fast, and didn't really stall at 160-170 but I had talked him into turning it down to 225. It did stall at about 185 for a while but we finished at 203 in a bit over 8 hours (no crutch/wrap). We debated and consulted Chef Google options and went with the straight foil wrap/blanket wrap into a cooler for about 3 hours and it came out perfect temp. It was just slightly dry, but had some good bark and fell apart. I learned a LOT and that was great.

I did Hasselback potatoes, some broccoli roasted with cayenne pepper, salt and pepper as well as some beans.

While not a competition ready brisket, it was absolutely a blast trying out his pellet cooker, hanging with him as well as dear daughter and especially the granddaughter (3) and twin boys (8 months). We were there for weeks before and after their birth, doing the 9 pm and 3 am shifts of feeds. Seeing their change and how interactive they are, my wife and I probably could have put BBQ sauce on a brick and have been just as happy. Just got back home from the trip.

I appreciate the thoughts and suggestions. Sorry to have gone so basic, but it was a great starting point for us.

LakeDog
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No. of Recommendations: 2
As you say, it's a great starting point. If you go back to my first posts on this board, I was even more basic than you. Didn't know anything. Now I get it right more than I get it wrong. Still not perfect, but I have had some great successes (per 1poorlady...she is the arbiter of whether I succeeded or not).

Sometimes I complete the process entirely on my WSM, and sometimes I finish in the oven. Depends what it is, how long it has taken, and whether there is really any point to continuing smoke. I think there's some debate about it, but I have read (somewhere!) that after three hours or so the smoke can't really get in anymore because of the crust that has formed, so not much difference finishing it in the oven at that point.

Keep smokin', and posting results (and recipes!).

1poorguy
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As sano posted, that pellet grill is just an oven in which one can add smoke for flavor.

Color me silly, but isn't that what a smoker is...An oven with smoke? :-)

Well, guess it all depends on fuel (charcoal, electric, pellets, wood) and wood additives for flavor used for cooking, but still...

Bill

*stirring the pot, me
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...went with the straight foil wrap/blanket wrap into a cooler for about 3 hours and it came out perfect temp. It was just slightly dry, but had some good bark and fell apart.

Next time, if you feel it's necessary, add a li'l bit of liquid of choice inside the foil before you wrap it. That "might" add just enough moisture to keep it from getting to the slightly dry'ish point.

I appreciate the thoughts and suggestions. Sorry to have gone so basic, but it was a great starting point for us.

Dude, when I joined this board I thought I'd been BBQ'ing for years because I grilled chicken or pork chops and slopped BBQ sauce on 'em. And...so on... ;-)

Basic is where we ALL started. I think I "might" finally be getting to the intermediate level. :-)

Bill

*who believes the only stupid question is the one not asked
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Sometimes I complete the process entirely on my WSM, and sometimes I finish in the oven.

OMW!! He's Swede'in' 'em!!! *

I think there's some debate about it, but I have read (somewhere!) that after three hours or so the smoke can't really get in anymore because of the crust that has formed, so not much difference finishing it in the oven at that point.

I've heard 'em all too. At first I truly believed IT MUST be fully cooked in the smoker.

Three or two years ago I realized I'm gettin' too old to stay up all night swillin' beers and stokin' the fire while smokin' butts. And, even though I fully loaded my SMW full of charcoal and had temps settled before I went to bed, when I would finally wake up to go check the temps, I'd purty much lost the fire by then. So...I cheated, I brought the butts inside, wrapped them in foil, set the oven temp at 225º, gave 'em another three or two hours and...perfection.

Bill

*Swede46 used to hang out with us years ago, but is now MIA *sigh
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As sano posted, that pellet grill is just an oven in which one can add smoke for flavor.

Color me silly, but isn't that what a smoker is...An oven with smoke? :-)


Nope. Dickshunary: " A smoker is an apparatus for cooking at low temperatures in a controlled, smoky environment for the smoking of food"

Modern pellet grills are far more versatile. They can do low and slow, sure. but Traegre and the clones it spawned have 'oven style' thermostats and digital temp control so they can effortlessly and relatively quickly change temps.

Sometimes, after 2:45 @ 225, I'll baste pork ribs and crank the temp to 300 to set the sauce and give 'em a touch of crisp.

Also, and this is the real big diff... if one dials up the temp on a pellet grill and waits for it to heat up, it's burning the fuel at a high temp so smoke/smoke flavor is minimal.
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Color me silly, but isn't that what a smoker is...An oven with smoke? :-)

Nope. Dickshunary: " A smoker is an apparatus for cooking at low temperatures in a controlled, smoky environment for the smoking of food"


Well, once again, color me silly. I do believe I can accomplish that with purty much anything you're willing to throw at me.

Also, and this is the real big diff... if one dials up the temp on a pellet grill and waits for it to heat up, it's burning the fuel at a high temp so smoke/smoke flavor is minimal.

Umm, okay. I think most of us on this board will agree that after about two or three hours into ANY type of smoking session the smoke will not penetrate the meat any further than it already has.

Even so, since I have so many Oak trees on my property, I realize that if I built myself a proper smoker, and fire pit, I could produce my own hot coals and continuously add smoke to the meats being cooked even though they might not be absorbing any more smoke.

BBQ is Low & Slow. Add smoke flavors when able.

Bill
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