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No. of Recommendations: 38
2 months ago my FICO hit 850. No where to go now but down.

I don't know that I have ever posted on this board before, and if I did, please accept my apologies. My oldest friend told me you guys would get this, why I am proud of it, and that it really is a big deal.

When I first came to this site, I was 25 years old, living with my parents, and $20K in debt not counting a car loan for almost that much. It was due to nothing but poor life decisions and a complete lack of understanding of money and how it works.

23 years later, this has happened. I have also own a home which I will have paid off by Q1 2020, I paid cash for my last 2 cars which were bought new, and I have a decent retirement account which will be kicked into overdrive once the house is paid off. Life is good. Great most of the time, in fact.

Did I come here to brag? Of course I did. But I also came here to say "thank you." I spent most of my time here making fart jokes and basically being a troll. I used to laugh at the people who washed ziplock baggies, stole ketchup packets, and reused paper towels, but in between that were many great lessons in personal finance and living frugally where it made sense. The lessons did sink in, a little bit at a time.

I just wanted to let you all know that...at least the few of you who are left.


R0TJob
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But did work get any better? I used to enjoy your tirades on the “This Job Sucks” board (RIP) although at times I wondered why you didn’t put some of that effort into finding a better job.

Glad things worked out for you.

Regards,

- HCF
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Congrats on the high FICO.

Go and use that high score for a low interst loan to take to Vegas? ;)


c
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That's good to read, RJ. Congratulations on such a major change. The consistency of daily changes in behaviors that that took is really quite impressive.

And in fact, you did post on this board once, in 2009, when you asked if someone with bad credit could get a car loan and got advice that extended to personal relationships.

ThyPeace, spending the year practicing and focusing on being consistent. Subject matter is different, but the goal is mastery of consistency itself, which I'm not as good at as I want to be.
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Go and use that high score for a low interst loan to take to Vegas? ;)


The irony of the high score is that I have no intention of using credit for anything ever again.
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R0TJob,

You wrote, The irony of the high score is that I have no intention of using credit for anything ever again.

No. The irony is that you probably will use it, whether you realize it or not.

Credit scores affect a lot of things you don't think of as credit. For instance, insurance companies pull credit reports when quoting rates. A high score gives you a lower rate. Do you use a credit card? (Not necessarily to borrow money.) Your score influences what types of cards you will be approved for and what benefits you can get. My employer (Microsoft) also pulled my credit report when I accepted a job offer from them 7 years ago. The job offer was contingent on me passing a background check which included a check on my credit worthiness.

I can scrounge up more examples if you want... But in this age, your credit score can materially impact your costs, where you live and what you get paid. The more credit-worthy you are, the more desirable a customer you are, the more ... stuff ... people will give you for less money. That's why a good score is so desirable.

- Joel
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{{The irony of the high score is that I have no intention of using credit for anything ever again. }}


I completely understand. We are the same with the exception of using credit cards but paying them off every month.


c
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<<I used to laugh at the people who washed ziplock baggies, stole ketchup packets, and reused paper towels>>



Heh, heh! Actually, those are things I laugh about too!



My own peculiar behaviors lie in somewhat different areas, but I post them so that others get some entertainment from time to time.


Seattle Pioneer
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<<Credit scores affect a lot of things you don't think of as credit. For instance, insurance companies pull credit reports when quoting rates. A high score gives you a lower rate. Do you use a credit card? (Not necessarily to borrow money.) Your score influences what types of cards you will be approved for and what benefits you can get. My employer (Microsoft) also pulled my credit report when I accepted a job offer from them 7 years ago. The job offer was contingent on me passing a background check which included a check on my credit worthiness.>>



Oh, boo hoo!


Personally I don't have any idea what my credit score is. And I don't care. High enough so that I've never been informed that I've been rejected for something.

Just.
Not.
Interested.


I suppose that's amusing since I accumulate Equifax stock using a DRIP.


Seattle Pioneer
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<<Credit scores affect a lot of things you don't think of as credit. For instance, insurance companies pull credit reports when quoting rates. A high score gives you a lower rate. Do you use a credit card? (Not necessarily to borrow money.) Your score influences what types of cards you will be approved for and what benefits you can get. My employer (Microsoft) also pulled my credit report when I accepted a job offer from them 7 years ago. The job offer was contingent on me passing a background check which included a check on my credit worthiness.>>



In 1985 I had no credit that I was aware of ----at age 35.


I wanted to finance a house.


I went to my local bank and completed an application. In the app, I disclosed that I held stock in the bank that was worth nearly as much a the loan I wanted to get, and that my net worth was greater than the loan I was applying for. I wound up bringing in documentation to verify that claim.

(This was for Washington Mutual Savings Bank, which failed circa 2008)


I got the loan! The value of the stock (some $200,000 in 2008) was all gone!



Seattle Pioneer
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In 1985 I had no credit that I was aware of ----at age 35.


I wanted to finance a house.


I went to my local bank and completed an application. In the app, I disclosed that I held stock in the bank that was worth nearly as much a the loan I wanted to get, and that my net worth was greater than the loan I was applying for. I wound up bringing in documentation to verify that claim.


The reason that you probably weren't aware of what your credit score was in 1985 (even after you applied for a mortgage), is that, in 1985, credit scoring was not commonly used for mortgages. It wasn't until the 1990s that credit scoring became a common criteria to qualify for a mortgage. In 1995, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac recommended that credit scoring be used for mortgages that they would purchase. It was at that point, almost all lenders started to use credit scores in their mortgage qualification process.

AJ
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Personally I don't have any idea what my credit score is. And I don't care. High enough so that I've never been informed that I've been rejected for something.

Seattle Pioneer


Are you checking your credit report for any errors or problems?

One of my credit cards gives me a FICO score on the monthly statement. If there is a significant change, it is a red flag to check my credit report. The one time that happened recently, it was that I has used credit cards for paying for a family trip.
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The irony of the high score is that I have no intention of using credit for anything ever again.

Are you using credit cards? To have a score of 850, it is very likely you are using credit cards and keeping them paid off.

If you decide to change credit cards, your FICO score will matter.
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I completely understand. We are the same with the exception of using credit cards but paying them off every month.

I do this too. I charge everything. Cash back is awesome.
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My own peculiar behaviors lie in somewhat different areas

Did you ever get new carpet?
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Did you ever get new carpet

If I weren't on my phone, I'd brave the search function.
I think he had answered this one...


peace & inquiring minds
t
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SP did get new carpet, it’s called grass. :)
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Congratulations. I've been around as long as you, and remember you starting out.
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Well done Sir. Very similar story. 783/847/850 when I checked last year.
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