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I saw Amy Stewart's "Kopp Sisters on the March" at our local library and was intrigued enough to grab it off the 'new releases' shelf and read it... and liked it quite a bit. Then I went back and read the series, admiring her mix of fiction and fact. Book six in the series will be published in January. A daughter is a big Seanan McQuire fan so I read some of her books so we could discuss the author and genre.

I think Donoghue is a fine writer and plan to read more of her works. I'm surprised I had missed her novels. I'll give her short stories a try. Funny, I just picked up a signed copy of "Astray" a week ago. My favorite short story writers are probably John Cheever (although he's fallen out of favor) and Alice Munro. I've read most of the 'Top 100' novels and I guess what I've been reading this year is a real hodge podge, some novels filling in blanks of 'fine literature' that I missed along the way (the Stegner, Greene, Roth, and Vonnegut titles), newer literature (Russo, Lerner, Donoghue, and McBride), and plain old escapism (Box, Child), mysteries (the Louise Penny 'Gamache' books have been a joy to read), and titles I've seen on the NYT books pages.

For anyone who's interested in a well-written page turner, "Wildland" by Rebecca Hodge is a very compelling read and was a pleasant surprise, especially in light of the wild fires burning out west.

I'll add your suggestions to my 'to read' list. Thanks.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
We have a lot of books and authors in common. I'm going to have to check out some of the books on your list. I love the Kopp sister books. Seanan McGuire worlds are ones I enjoy visiting but I don't think I want to live in. Have you read Middlegame? If you like short stories, Emma Donoghue's Astray is a good collection. Another writer you might like is Sarah Gailey. Her Magic for Liars is like Raymond Chandler or Dashel Hammett wrote a murder mystery in a school for magic. Don't think Hogwarts, think Phillip's Academy or Exeter. Thanks for your post. I read a lot of middle grades and YA books too. If anyone has interest in those types of books, let me know there are many great books being written for those audiences.
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I saw Amy Stewart's "Kopp Sisters on the March" at our local library and was intrigued enough to grab it off the 'new releases' shelf and read it... and liked it quite a bit. Then I went back and read the series, admiring her mix of fiction and fact. Book six in the series will be published in January. A daughter is a big Seanan McQuire fan so I read some of her books so we could discuss the author and genre.

I think Donoghue is a fine writer and plan to read more of her works. I'm surprised I had missed her novels. I'll give her short stories a try. Funny, I just picked up a signed copy of "Astray" a week ago. My favorite short story writers are probably John Cheever (although he's fallen out of favor) and Alice Munro. I've read most of the 'Top 100' novels and I guess what I've been reading this year is a real hodge podge, some novels filling in blanks of 'fine literature' that I missed along the way (the Stegner, Greene, Roth, and Vonnegut titles), newer literature (Russo, Lerner, Donoghue, and McBride), and plain old escapism (Box, Child), mysteries (the Louise Penny 'Gamache' books have been a joy to read), and titles I've seen on the NYT books pages.

For anyone who's interested in a well-written page turner, "Wildland" by Rebecca Hodge is a very compelling read and was a pleasant surprise, especially in light of the wild fires burning out west.

I'll add your suggestions to my 'to read' list. Thanks.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
PucksFool: Another writer you might like is Sarah Gailey. Her Magic for Liars is like Raymond Chandler or Dashel Hammett wrote a murder mystery in a school for magic.


I finished both Magic for Liars and Upright Women Wanted. Magic for Liars was a clever blend of Noir, Detective and Fantasy with a dash of LGBTQ. The storyline and characters were interesting, although the characters were perhaps a little too flawed for me. Ivy was painfully lonesome, lonely and lost in the way that characters often are in film noir or hard-boiled detective fiction. Gailey has a wonderful imagination although I was not thrilled by much of the poor decision-making by either Ivy or Tabitha... although I see why Gailey wrote them that way. Ivy's relationship with Rahul didn't fully work for me for a few reasons -- mostly the poor decision-making again -- but especially the ending with Ivy attempting a reconciliation.

I actually found Upright Women Wanted more enjoyable. Another genre-blending novel -- pulp Western futurism featuring anti-fascist queer librarian gunslingers (whoa, that's a mouthful) -- at turns funny, sweet, adventuresome, and political.


PucksFool: If you like short stories, Emma Donoghue's Astray is a good collection.

I am three stories into Astray. Donoghue is such a fine writer... I'm going to have to run the table on the rest of her works.

Happy reading and thanks again.
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I am so glad you wrote the description for Upright Women Wanted. I tried describing it to someone and I did not do it justice.
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