No. of Recommendations: 3
“I Would Love Medicare for All”: A Nevada Culinary Union Member on Why She Supports Bernie Sanders
https://inthesetimes.com/article/22317/medicare-for-all-neva...

Did the union poll members about the endorsement?

"No, they didn’t. Typically, I get called for those types of things, because I’m a shop steward.
Talking one-on-one, a lot of members want Bernie. But when we’re in the setting of citywide meetings or things that are exclusive to shop stewards, there’s a clear message that, “the person who wants Medicare for All wants to take away our hard work.”

"It’s disappointing as a progressive."


This has Neera Tanden's stench all over it.

Then winecave Pete made the point last night that Bernie Sanders doesn't have the support of this Union (where clearly the members do).

Bernie Sanders responded, "I have more union support than you could possibly dream of."
(SLAP)

oh that had to hurt! Don't even ask him if he's alright.


Dominic
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No. of Recommendations: 4
No. of Recommendations: 2
...says he's fighting for people who "love" their for-profit health insurer.

What's he smoking?


High grade reality weed.

Sorry, Bernie, but most Americans like their health insurance the way it is

No, really. You wouldn’t know it to read most of the news coverage, or to listen to politicians, but that is one of the more consistent results in health-care polling: Over and over again, roughly 7 out of every 10 Americans report that they’re fairly satisfied with the quality of their personal coverage.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2019/05/03/sorry-ber...

“Medicare For All” is a great idea until you tell the whole story: “Medicare-For-All Except You Can’t Keep Your Current Plan”.

It’s “New Coke” all over again.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
people who "love" their for-profit health insurer.

- they have gold-plated plans (executives, some professionals, some union members, some non-profit workers--eg, DD's new job involves significant travel to developing countries so they offer a fabulous low-cost health plan in case of illness or injury--so DD & fam switched from SIL's university professor's plan)

- they don't know any better (the people they know on govt plans are on Medicaid or on Medicare without a supplemental, their for-profit plan is all they know and--SO FAR--it pays most of their medical bills, they don't know they don't have to argue w/Medicare over coverage the way they do w/an insurance company, they don;t know that the vast majority of drs in the country take Medicare--unlike their insurance plan...)
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No. of Recommendations: 1
people who "love" their for-profit health insurer.
- they have gold-plated plans
- they don't know any better


- they do know better. They know what people on Obamacare have had to deal with and don't want any part of more Democrat-devised health insurance. Possibly?
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Before ACA, my brother was unable to renew his for-profit insurance as he was diabetic, in the hopital when his bill came due, missed a payment and they cancelled (note to all: auto-pay important bills like health insurance!). He was a business owner who hadn't had employer-provided health insurance since his 20s.

I was uninsured in my early 20s until I got married. I used to joke that I married both of my husbands for their health insurance, but it was partly the case. In my early 20s I got health care 3 times. Once at a free clinic, once at a GYN where I paid out of pocket. Once in an ER as I couldn't get a dr to see me while I was traveling, uninsured, and became very ill (strep throat, easily cured w/penicillin) even though I offered to pay cash on the spot. The ER gave me a peniciilin shot and a bottle of pills. I took up about half a minute of a triage nurse's time and a minute of a dr's time. They took me quickly as I was coughing so much and so hard, they worried I'd get other people in the waiting room sick. My fever was very high, I was so weak I could barely walk or eat, and I might've died trying to get for-profit care.
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No. of Recommendations: 4
“Medicare For All” is a great idea until you tell the whole story: “Medicare-For-All Except You Can’t Keep Your Current Plan”.

People love their healthcare until they go to the Doctor and find it really doesn't cover anything. There are a lot of bad plans out there.

https://www.healthcaredive.com/news/unitedhealth-survey-most...

If their literacy on healthcare is so low how can they know if they love it or not?

Most people do not understand what they have so how can they even understand if they like it? It's time to educate people and make it easier to understand what they have, but the Insurance companies do not want that to happen.

https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2019/12/do-americans-want-ch...

But Buttigieg and his fellow travelers might be wrong, according to a new report from Axios, based in part on research by the Kaiser Family Foundation. When people have choice in health care, they don’t often exercise it. People “rarely switch” health insurance plans “even if they could have gotten a better deal,” Axios reports — and the tendency is widespread. Workers who get insurance through their employers usually keep whichever option they initially picked, no matter what alternatives are available to them. “You’re more likely to stick with the choice you’ve already made if you’re not sure you’re going to benefit from switching,” economist Benjamin Handel told the New York Times back in 2014. Handel’s research, as cited by the Times, found that workers lost “as much as $2,000 a year by staying in their insurance plans.” Though the ACA’s marketplaces were designed to protect choice and to encourage competitive pricing from insurers, they also aren’t working as intended. Most people don’t shop around for better coverage, according to data provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; the Trump administration’s decision to cut funding for insurance navigators, who help consumers choose the best plan for their needs, is at least partially responsible for the trend.

Andy
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Before ACA, my brother was unable to renew his for-profit insurance as he was diabetic, in the hopital when his bill came due, missed a payment and they cancelled (note to all: auto-pay important bills like health insurance!). He was a business owner who hadn't had employer-provided health insurance since his 20s.

Guaranteed issuance is great. I remember filling out those forms, wondering if we'd missed something, giving the insurance company a loophole to cancel our coverage just when we needed it.

Obamacare/ACA has some very good features. They don't help much when you can't afford the co-pays, deductibles and co-insurance. At least, that's what I hear people say. We buy our insurance on the exchange, it's expensive and has high deductibles, and a shockingly narrow network. We can afford it, though, the premiums and all the rest.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
They don't help much when you can't afford the co-pays, deductibles and co-insurance. At least, that's what I hear people say. We buy our insurance on the exchange, it's expensive and has high deductibles, and a shockingly narrow network. We can afford it, though, the premiums and all the rest.

Everyone I know who has ACA likes or loves it. Most find it cheaper than whatever they had before (in some cases, what they had beofe was no insurance). Your deductibles/copays depends on what kind of plan you choose. Some states/locales don;t have as much choice as others. People with aboive median income don;t get a subsidy so their premiums are more.

My brother went from paying $1600/month premium pre-ACA--with exclusions to paying $850 under ACA with no subsidy and no exclusions for a Silver plan (medium level deductible/copays).

A friend went from paying about $2000/mo to paying a few hundred for comparable coverage.

A couple of couples paid more under ACA, but had better coverage with much lower deductibles/copays--they previously had catastrophic plans since they were middle-aged and healthy. But as they aged, their health declined so they're very happy with ACA plans instead of giant deductibles w/catastrophic plans.
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No. of Recommendations: 5
people love their healthcare until they go to the Doctor and find it really doesn't cover anything.

I don't think that is the experience of most employer-sponsored plans.

It certainly is not the experience of most union-sponsored plans - which is where a lot of the democratic kick-back is coming from on this issue.


For example, my wife is a teacher and a union member. She has a healthcare plan that cost her $1 a year (actually $.0.98). My wife also has cancer. Her daily cancer drugs are free under her healthcare plan. If my wife was on my fortune 100 healthcare plan, we would have a copay of roughly $200 (20%) a month.

My wife's health insurance is much better than an existing Medicare.

My wife has been a democrat all her life. She comes from a family of teachers who were also union members.

None of them are excited about the idea of a compulsory Medicare for All solution.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
“I Would Love Medicare for All”: A Nevada Culinary Union Member on Why She Supports Bernie Sanders
https://inthesetimes.com/article/22317/medicare-for-all-neva...

Did the union poll members about the endorsement?

"No, they didn’t. Typically, I get called for those types of things, because I’m a shop steward.
Talking one-on-one, a lot of members want Bernie. But when we’re in the setting of citywide meetings or things that are exclusive to shop stewards, there’s a clear message that, “the person who wants Medicare for All wants to take away our hard work.”

"It’s disappointing as a progressive."


This has Neera Tanden's stench all over it.

Then winecave Pete made the point last night that Bernie Sanders doesn't have the support of this Union (where clearly the members do).

Bernie Sanders responded, "I have more union support than you could possibly dream of."
(SLAP)

oh that had to hurt! Don't even ask him if he's alright.


Dominic
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Everyone I know who has ACA likes or loves it. Most find it cheaper than whatever they had before (in some cases, what they had beofe was no insurance). Your deductibles/copays depends on what kind of plan you choose. Some states/locales don;t have as much choice as others. People with aboive median income don;t get a subsidy so their premiums are more.

My brother went from paying $1600/month premium pre-ACA--with exclusions to paying $850 under ACA with no subsidy and no exclusions for a Silver plan (medium level deductible/copays).

A friend went from paying about $2000/mo to paying a few hundred for comparable coverage.


Sure, there are winners, and losers. People with pre-existing conditions might get to pay less than they did before. The cost is shared between the healthy and the not so healthy, as it should be.

I'm surprised that most you know find it cheaper, though. Health care costs have risen for almost everybody. Our family's premium cost has more than tripled since the ACA was signed, deductibles are up by a factor of 10 (we choose a Bronze plan to keep premium cost down). Before we had a PPO. Now we have a very narrow HMO.

We've always supported the ACA, and still do. But we can afford it.
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my wife is a teacher and a union member. She has a healthcare plan that cost her $1 a year (actually $.0.98).

Where does she work? Major city like NY or Chicago? Teachers w/great health insurance generally work in major cities with powerful unions. This is not the case for most.

My son is a public school teacher in a MA suburb. IIRC his premium is $100/mo to cover only himself. He very rarely needs care, so I forget about copays or drug coverage, but it ain't gold-plated. He's groovy with M4A and is a Bernie supporter. AS is his GF, a phys ed teacher in a small town district in MA. She has had major health issues the past year, starting with a C-diff infection following antibiotic treatment for a salivary gland infection. She had to fight for weeks to get the prpper, more expensive medication for C-diff! She also doesn;t have gold-plated insurance and is a "Bernie bro." But yes, they'll vote for whichever DEM is the candidate.
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Well, everyone on Medicare will tell you it isn't zero dollars. Basic Medicare A is zero....but the supplement is $70 and up depending upon income and the drug plans are usually $25 and up and could be 2 or 3 times that depending upon your income.

Likely BernieKare would be modeled on ObamaKare and you would be paying money each month for coverage.....likely several hundred dollars.....


t
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Where does she work? Major city like NY or Chicago? Teachers w/great health insurance generally work in major cities with powerful unions. This is not the case for most.

Indiana. A Right to Work state.

As we saw with the Nevada Culinary Union, one doesn't need to be in a high profile powerful union to have negotiated a benefit that is desirable by the union members.

She had to fight for weeks to get the prpper, more expensive medication for C-diff!

On that point, Medicare For All would not necessarily be substantially better. People fight with Medicare all the time regarding their coverage. The Medicare Appeal Process is very similar to any private insurance. Typical turn around is about 60 days from initial submission of an appeal to the first response. If you don't like that response, there are four more levels of appeal, each one adding another 60 days or so.
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- they do know better. They know what people on Obamacare have had to deal with and don't want any part of more Democrat-devised health insurance.

I keep reading how awful Obamacare is. What is so awful about it?

Serious question.

CNC
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No. of Recommendations: 0
I keep reading how awful Obamacare is. What is so awful about it?

Serious question.


I'm curious about this as well.

Here's our limited experience:

We've had an ACA bronze policy since the beginning of the year and haven't used it for anything yet. With the subsidy, we currently pay around $15/month premium. We may have to adjust that, depending on how closely we can hit our target on MAGI (Modified Adjusted Gross income) this year, the first in our early retirement. The (generic) drugs we have prescriptions for can be filled using GoodRx for a quite reasonable amount. Our co-pays are certainly higher than we enjoyed under the insurance provided through my wife's employer, but we paid a lot more towards the premiums, even with the employer paying a portion. I will most likely need cataract surgery this year - so we'll see how that works out cost-wise.
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No. of Recommendations: 12
CNC writes,

I keep reading how awful Obamacare is. What is so awful about it?

Serious question.

</snip>


It leaves a for-profit health insurance company between you and your doctor. A company that can/will increase profits and executive compensation by denying you the health care your premiums paid for.

Here's an example.

Last week I called my Obamacare insurer (Molina) to confirm that think Shingrix is a covered preventive service without cost sharing (it is, I just want to make sure they know it) and whether I can get the vaccine at a Pharmacy, or do I need to get it a my Primary Care Physician's office. Molina told me I needed to go to the doctor's office for the vaccine.

Doctor's office says Molina only covers Shingrix if you get it at a Pharmacy. If you do it at the doctor's they're going to bill me out-of-pocket for the whole thing ($600).

I sent Molina a message asking if I need to file a complaint with the Washington State Insurance Commissioner to sort this out?

After a couple of more phone calls with Molina where nothing was resolved, I filed a complaint with the WA State Insurance Commissioner. They quickly determined that Molina's direction to go to my doctor's office for the Shingrix vaccine was incorrect and that it would only be cost free if I got it at a pharmacy. The Pharmacy receipt I got was approval for a $209.99 Shingrix vaccine with a $0 co-pay. I need to return in 8 weeks for the second shot and I assume another $209.99 charge with $0 co-pay.

One wonders how many people Molina is telling to go to their doctor's office where they'll be hit with a $600 "surprise bill". There's apparently no penalty for a for-profit insurer who harms his customers in this fashion.

Note I'm a very sophisticated health care consumer who's in good health and keeps his doctor's on a short leash. And I'm getting this kind of run-around on a simple vaccine? I can't imagine being sick and having to deal with an insurance company.

intercst
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me: I keep reading how awful Obamacare is. What is so awful about it?

Serious question.

intercstL It leaves a for-profit health insurance company between you and your doctor. A company that can/will increase profits and executive compensation by denying you the health care your premiums paid for.

This doesn't seem like a good reason to want to keep your regular, for profit insurance policy instead.

Actually, it doesn't explain a thing. Just a rant.

Can't you do better than just give me your personal prejudice?

CNC
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Sorry, Bernie, but most Americans like their health insurance the way it is

No, really. You wouldn’t know it to read most of the news coverage, or to listen to politicians, but that is one of the more consistent results in health-care polling: Over and over again, roughly 7 out of every 10 Americans report that they’re fairly satisfied with the quality of their personal coverage.


-----------------------
I am not convinced this survey result means what some moderate Democrats want to think it means. For many years when I was in my 20's to late 40's, I was very healthy and probably averaged less than one visit to a healthcare provider per year. I worked for large corporations that paid much of my health insurance costs, and I rarely used it. If you asked me on a survey during that time if I liked my health insurance, I would have said that I did. But that is only because I had no reason not to like it. It was cheap and I didn't really need it, so I liked it just fine. If it were a logic table, health insurance was a "don't care" for me.

And while many healthy Americans may not have any reason to complain about their largely unused health insurance (so they answer that they like it when polled), that group might well be aware of less healthy friends and relatives that don't have it so good and have had terrible experiences with health insurance. So I don't think it is likely that moderates can count on nearly as much resistance to M4A as they might want to imply from a poll that doesn't ask more meaningful questions than, "Do you like your health insurance?".

Also, people may be satisfied with their health insurance and still see the US health care system as badly broken and needing repair.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
This doesn't seem like a good reason to want to keep your regular, for profit insurance policy instead.

I think the difference is whether your insurance is a group plan partially paid for by an employer, or you have to buy your insurance on the individual market.

I never had a single complaint about coverage when I was working for fortune 500 companies. I'm sure the insurance company wanted to keep their very profitable, Cadillac insurance coverage that was paid substantially out of corporate dollars. They never denied coverage or made me jump through hoops to get my claims paid.

Once I started buying health insurance policies on the individual market, everything changed for the worse. Everything was denied and had to be appealed. ACA did not change the poor treatment I got from my individual policies regarding claim coverage, but it did give me certain advantages in making appeals, in cost (because of subsidy), and with some guaranteed periodic preventative coverage.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Ask how much they liked their insurance after getting into an accident and taken to a hospital out of network.

😉
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No. of Recommendations: 2
My wife's health insurance is much better than an existing Medicare.

My wife has been a democrat all her life. She comes from a family of teachers who were also union members.

None of them are excited about the idea of a compulsory Medicare for All solution.


My wife is also a teacher. She has to pay $120 dollars a month for health insurance. She has been in a Union all her career.

I am also in a union, I pay $400 a month. The company I work for is in the Fortune 500, in fact they are under 200. I have to pay all my healthcare until it hits $3500 dollars a year, then I go on a 20/80 portion of the plan till I hit $5000 dollars a year. I never hit $3500 dollars a year so I pay over $6000 dollars and I work a full time job.

I come from a long line of Union Activists and all of my family are in Unions. We would be more than happy to give up our healthcare for Healthcare for all. In fact the Culinary Union in Nevada would not endorse anyone and some of their members, who have a golden plan, stated they are willing to give up theirs also for the good of the Country.

What you all do not understand is that the Corporations have breached the agreement where you work for them and they give you a livable wage with good healthcare. Now they give you a livable wage with no increases and expect you to pick up most of the plan.
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Ask them how much they like it now because insurance plans are changing a lot now. Our company moved us onto a HSA and HRA plans doing away with the PPO completely. Just wait four more years and see how unhappy people are.

Andy
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No. of Recommendations: 9
CountNoCount: I keep reading how awful Obamacare is. What is so awful about it?

Serious question.


My point way up thread when I wrote "They know what people on Obamacare have had to deal with and don't want any part of more Democrat-devised health insurance", I was referring to the widespread perception that the ACA/Obamacare is awful. I don't think it's awful, but it does have it's problems that need to be fixed. I liked Biden's plan for ACA 2.0, as something that's possible:

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/07/15/joe-biden-health-c...

OK. Now here's my families actual 2020 ACA plan:

2020 Bronze Plan - Family of 5
Premium $1434/month, $17,213/year before subsidy
Deductible $7,700 individual/$15,400 family
Out of pocket limit $8,150 individual/$16,300 family (not including premiums, balance billing and out of network costs - these are not covered)
Primary doctor visit $60 copay
Specialist visit $120 copay

Subsidy - Premium Tax Credit (PTC) - families/individuals are eligible for a subsidy if their modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) is less than 400% of the federal poverty level. MAGI for most people is their AGI. In 2020 for our family of 5, if we have an AGI of $120,680 we get a PTC of $9,228. If we make $120,685 we get a PTC of $0. That's the subsidy cliff.

I went part-time in late 2016, and we got a subsidy in '17 and '18. I messed up for '19, no subsidy. I'm determined to get one for '20. In 2018 we were close to the subsidy cliff so I spent $2K on new computers for our business to make sure we saved over $8K on health insurance.

We've had similar issues dealing with the insurance company as Intercst and Nessie have mentioned. For example, they refused to cover my coloscopy despite me having prior approval and it being totally covered. I went back and forth with them for months. They would not budge (I now know I should have contacted my state insurance commission). I gave up. Months later they sent a check for the full amount, after they were audited by the state.

Our current insurer is a "non-profit" who is basically a Medicaid provider. We effectively get the same network as the folks on Medicaid. Not *too* bad, but nothing like we had with our PPO plan before the ACA - which, of course, we could not keep, along with our doctors.

Guaranteed issuance is great. Not having to fill out all those medical history forms is wonderful. The coverage is reasonable, in network. The cost is very high and the network very narrow.

Once I stop working altogether we can manage our income better and get higher subsidies. We might then consider a Silver or Gold plan, possibly with a larger insurance company that may have a wider network. It's not lost on me, this "manage our income" to get free money. It didn't ought to be that way. It didn't ought to cost $17K for high deductible health insurance, either.

I'll repeat: We've always supported the ACA, and still do. But we can afford it. In 2017 Mrs.C. got sick and spent a few days in hospital (in network, mostly). We hit our deductible and got to itemize medical costs on our tax return. No big deal for us, financially. Most folks would be in trouble when faced with medical bills for $10K or so.
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Forgot to put in my post above: Subsidy calculator:

https://www.kff.org/interactive/subsidy-calculator/
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In fact the Culinary Union in Nevada would not endorse anyone and some of their members, who have a golden plan, stated they are willing to give up theirs also for the good of the Country.

You spin that like a politician. "Some" is probably accurate. There are probably at least 2 or 3 members that share that opinion. Nice vague term. Would not endorse? How about specifically criticized Bernie's plan?

https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2020/02/bernie-sanders-n...
So the union garnered significant attention over the past week because of its implicit criticism of Bernie Sanders—a flyer distributed to members stated that Bernie Sanders wants to “End Culinary Healthcare.” The union didn’t endorse any of the other Democratic candidates, but the dig was clear.

-------------

What you all do not understand is that the Corporations have breached the agreement where you work for them and they give you a livable wage with good healthcare.

What agreement? Employer-sponsored healthcare is less than 100 years old. There has never been such an agreement.

If not for the restrictions placed on employers in WW2 (1942 Stabilization Act), there may never have been widespread employer-sponsored healthcare.

Until ACA, there was not a requirement that an employer provide ANY healthcare benefit.
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You spin that like a politician. "Some" is probably accurate. There are probably at least 2 or 3 members that share that opinion. Nice vague term

You talk just like a Republican. Using vague words then trying to make it look like someone else was using vague words. Probably LOL. Since you really do not know what you are talking about, or are outright obfuscating (didn't want to use the term lie) the truth. Nobody knows how many people in the Culinary union are voting for Bernie because there never was a poll taken and if a poll is taken it is not clear how many would tell the truth.

But some members are disillusioned that the union is flexing its muscle against a healthcare policy they believe could deliver a windfall to unions by freeing them to focus on other issues at the bargaining table.

In These Times spoke to Marcie Wells, a shop steward with Culinary Workers 226 who has worked at Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville inside the Flamingo Hotel and Casino for 16 years. Wells discussed Medicare for All, the union’s endorsement decision and her support for Bernie Sanders.


https://inthesetimes.com/article/22317/medicare-for-all-neva...

If you bother to read that you (which I doubt you will since you do not even bother to read your own links) you will see the Union never did a Poll of their members. The Culinary and Unite is a very bottom up union and to not Poll their members would be seen that they were afraid of what the poll would bring out. They are very militant.


Would not endorse? How about specifically criticized Bernie's plan?

Ok Hawkin did they endorse anyone or not? They did not criticize Warrens plan did they. According to all the Moderates on this board Bernie and Warrens plans are almost identical. Why do you try to twist words to suit your narrative?

What agreement? Employer-sponsored healthcare is less than 100 years old. There has never been such an agreement.

That is an ignorant statement. There was an agreement between the Companies and the Unions. That is what Unions fought for. I thought you said your wife was in a Union. You might want to go check her contract and get back to me.

If not for the restrictions placed on employers in WW2 (1942 Stabilization Act), there may never have been widespread employer-sponsored healthcare.

LOL that is to funny. If it wasn't for the Unions there never, not may, have been wide spread employer-sponsored healthcare. (There I fixed that for you)

Andy
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