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I'm curious why you wouldn't want a preseasoned pan.

Because I only eat kosher food. I have no way of knowing if the oil used for seasoning is kosher. It might contain fat from a non-kosher animal.

Cooking kosher food in such a pot would make the food unkosher.

(If you don't know what kosher is, I created a website to explain it: http://kosher.us/ )

Lodge used to sell kosher-verified pre-seasoned pans. Which just means that an independent organization certified that the oil they used was kosher. (It was vegetable oil.) Unfortunately, Lodge no longer does this.

When I originally posted, I knew that a pre-seasoned skillet can be made kosher through a process called libun gamur. It requires heating the item to 800°F, usually with a blowtorch. This method didn't strike me as practical. (For one thing, I don't own a blowtorch.)

But through additional internet research I've learned that some self-cleaning ovens reach a temperature of 800°F. So I can put the pan in the oven and running a self-clean cycle, which will destroy (by burning) any non-kosher ingredients that might be on the pan.

I need to verify with a reliable source (a rabbi) that this is acceptable. Apparently some modern self-cleaning ovens only get to 700°F, which isn't sufficient. Further research is required.
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It's not that hard to strip off the coating. I'm curious why you wouldn't want a preseasoned pan. I think it would be hard to find one because the seasoning protects the pan from rust from the manufacturer
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I want to add a cast iron skillet to our set of cooking tools, but…

All the ones I see on Amazon are pre-seasoned, and I need one that's not pre-seasoned.


Most of the ones I see in stores, etc. are pre-seasoned but Harbor Freight Tools has a set of Chinese manufactured ones that were not seasoned when I last saw them (See; https://www.harborfreight.com/3-piece-cast-iron-frying-pans-... ).
;-)

C.J.V.
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Check youtube for video's on seasoning iron skillets. Most show you how to "unseason" before seasoning.
just a thought
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I seasoned a cast ironed skillet years ago and then bought a seasoned one. I noticed no difference.

I still can’t fry eggs on cast iron without them sticking like some say, but don’t really have any need to do that anyway. I use cast iron mostly for searing meats and for the rest of that dish, but that is about it.

A.J.
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hey- you have balloons...

peace & Christmas Eve
t
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Well, my cousin is a frying pan connoisseur. He has a flea market booth and sells the antique ones. He is adamant about how great the older ones are compared to the newer ones. He says the "Lodge" brand is the worst ever made. You might try finding an older one at a flea market or I am pretty sure ebay has all levels of them. There are a lot of collectors of the rare ones, etc.

Good luck!

-Footsox
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Well, my cousin is a frying pan connoisseur. He has a flea market booth and sells the antique ones. He is adamant about how great the older ones are compared to the newer ones. He says the "Lodge" brand is the worst ever made. You might try finding an older one at a flea market or I am pretty sure ebay has all levels of them. There are a lot of collectors of the rare ones, etc.

I think for the most part people have caught Cast Iron Fever and are trading them and hyping them up to make a larger profit. I condition a few Lodge pans and they work just as well as the older pans. People were taking the newer Lodge pans and sanding a mirror finish on them and then having problems with the seasoning not sticking. The new sanding method is to leave the surface a little rough.
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I'm curious why you wouldn't want a preseasoned pan.

Because I only eat kosher food. I have no way of knowing if the oil used for seasoning is kosher. It might contain fat from a non-kosher animal.

Cooking kosher food in such a pot would make the food unkosher.

(If you don't know what kosher is, I created a website to explain it: http://kosher.us/ )

Lodge used to sell kosher-verified pre-seasoned pans. Which just means that an independent organization certified that the oil they used was kosher. (It was vegetable oil.) Unfortunately, Lodge no longer does this.

When I originally posted, I knew that a pre-seasoned skillet can be made kosher through a process called libun gamur. It requires heating the item to 800°F, usually with a blowtorch. This method didn't strike me as practical. (For one thing, I don't own a blowtorch.)

But through additional internet research I've learned that some self-cleaning ovens reach a temperature of 800°F. So I can put the pan in the oven and running a self-clean cycle, which will destroy (by burning) any non-kosher ingredients that might be on the pan.

I need to verify with a reliable source (a rabbi) that this is acceptable. Apparently some modern self-cleaning ovens only get to 700°F, which isn't sufficient. Further research is required.
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Thank you, C.J. Voelkel!

I had tried searching amazon and google, but every link I found was to pre-seasoned.

I really like the looks of that KochCookware No.306, with it's machined glass-smooth surface. But at $239, it's a bit out of my budget! https://kochcookware.com/products/no-306-r

So I'll get something cheaper. That 3-skillet set looks like a great bargain (though shipping almost doubles the price). The Cajun Classic 10-Inch is only $16 + $7 shipping.

Thanks again!
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I had tried searching amazon and google, but every link I found was to pre-seasoned.

I did a search using DuckDuckGo on the term “unseasoned cast iron skillet” and this came up (See; https://duckduckgo.com/?q=unseasoned+cast+iron+skillet&t... ). It was than just a matter of wading through the results.
;-)

I knew that a pre-seasoned skillet can be made kosher through a process called libun gamur. It requires heating the item to 800°F, usually with a blowtorch. This method didn't strike me as practical. (For one thing, I don't own a blowtorch.)

But through additional internet research I've learned that some self-cleaning ovens reach a temperature of 800°F. So I can put the pan in the oven and running a self-clean cycle, which will destroy (by burning) any non-kosher ingredients that might be on the pan.


Heating a cast iron pan to 800°F with a blowtorch may cause it to warp or even crack. There is another method of removing the seasoning called saponification. One heats the skillet with a strong caustic solution. The caustic reacts with the oils in the seasoning and converts the oils into soap, which is then washed away. If it were me, I’d spray the inside of the skillet with oven cleaner and put it into a moderately cool (250 degree) oven for maybe 20 or 15 minutes. After that time, I’d wash it well with hot tap water and dish detergent and dry it. You may want to repeat 3 or 2 times to be sure you removed all the seasoning oils before reseasoning. I don’t know if that would make the skillet kosher so you might run the process by your rabbi.

C.J.V. - retired chemist who made lots of soap, me
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