Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 6
About "testing" retirement.

http://beta.morningstar.com/articles/814615/what-i-learned-f...

most interesting portion to me was in item 10

"wondered why so many people drive cars in my neighborhood when they could just as easily walk or ride their bikes ...--about how grateful I am for my departed parents and my whole beautiful extended family. I decided ... should get ourselves to Asia soon, and take some more road trips. I reconsidered a grudge I had been holding against a loved one and decided to let it go. I actually think I might have gotten a little bit wiser."

My laid-off time has gotten to over a month now - and I am beginning to
consider that the ability to schedule things at my own time and my own pace
is a lot more pleasing than I had expected. Spending is much more flexible
than I had initially planned - and time together with the family is much
more pleasant when there is no count-down clock to Monday or any particular
time of day.

Howie52
Still looking for work - but wondering about the reasoning as well as the need.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
My laid-off time has gotten to over a month now - and I am beginning to
consider that the ability to schedule things at my own time and my own pace
is a lot more pleasing than I had expected.


That was one of the reasons I worked part-time for 13 years (1993 to 2006). It was liberating. 20 hours a week was enough income to support my LBYM lifestyle, so all it did was delay plans for an early retirement. A fair trade-off, IMO.

My parents retired to Las Vegas during that time, so I could rearrange my hours and manage five or six 2-week trips to Las Vegas in a year. And back then, I could sometimes fly for as little as $49 round trip (from Minnesota).
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
<<That was one of the reasons I worked part-time for 13 years (1993 to 2006). It was liberating. 20 hours a week was enough income to support my LBYM lifestyle, so all it did was delay plans for an early retirement. A fair trade-off, IMO.>>



For years I was self employed as a gas appliance repairman. My desired work hours during the busy winter season was from noon-2 PM, although I could be bullied into working more sometimes.

During the slack summer season, I could take my boat out cruising and put my feet up on the stern. When I got an occasional call asking for service, I could schedule it for when I planned to be back in town -----not too many people were in a rush to get their furnace fixed in August.


Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
Good attitude, SP. You'll live a lot longer.

I was forced to leave a mid-mgr job at 60. Did some consulting for a couple of years, until one day my wife asked "Say, do you REALLY want more work?" After some honest thought, I said "Not really."

"Fine", she said. "You're retired - okay?" LOL

We're not well off but comfortable and that was over a decade ago.

Vermonter (poorer but happy on our ridge here in Vermont)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 6
My laid-off time has gotten to over a month now - and I am beginning to
consider that the ability to schedule things at my own time and my own pace
is a lot more pleasing than I had expected.


My husband retired four years ago. Well, he tells people that he retired but he actually quit his high paying job in financial services in Manhattan. He was 65 1/2 and still working 12 hour days. He had been laid off three times after hitting the ripe old age of 52. We had just started paying back the kids college tuition and things were looking rosy until the first layoff. We had to sell our house and relocate to another state where hubby took a job with a 50% pay cut. The upside was that our daughter lived an hour and a half away and we got to see more of her, her hubby and the dog.
We all thought that my husband would have a hard time in retirement and the exact opposite is true.
We got a dog three years ago and he keeps us busy. He's like having a permanent toddler in the house. We like our neighbors very much which was not the case when living in a big impersonal city like Brooklyn, where we lived for 8 years after moving from Rhode Island where we spent only two years. Our neighbors are so nice that I used to ask "what's in the water?" We live in an association of 18 houses and most of the people are our age or older. They are hardy New Englanders and my 85 year old neighbor runs circles around me (age 68).
For the first time in our lives we are not worried about another layoff. We are not worried about how we will pay the bills. We live as well as we did when my husband was working full time. We downsized our house and it is affordable and adorable. We heat with gas which is much cheaper than the oil we had in all our other houses. The supermarket is about a 20 minute drive but the prices are absolutely fantastic compared to the small disgusting supermarket that we shopped at locally in our old neighborhood. We do have a local gourmet market but the prices are ridiculous and we go there when we really need something
I must say that I find it amazing that we are not bored. I no longer feel guilty if I spend the day reading a good book. Hubby is constantly tweaking his portfolio which although not very big has done right by us in the past four years.
Anyway, retirement is so much nicer than we ever expected and seeing my daughter and two granddaughters on a regular basis is icing on the cake. Retiring is a scary prospect at first but for us it has turned out well. We used to be two type A people but have learned to slow down and smell the roses.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 29
My DH retired in 1995 at the age of 51. We both had sacrificed living what some thought was certainly silly but perfected the idea of LBYMs. We made up for that however when moving to Florida in 1996 and buying a house on the water (with a pool) and a new 36' Catalina sailboat.

When bored with that lifestyle, it was sell everything and buy a motor home and travel the country, which we did for a few years until boredom set in with that activity. Traded the motor home for a park model in an RV resort in Florida but that quickly grew old.

In 2006 we made the move to NW Arkansas, his golfing days were over but he settled into a part time activity of wood working and building furniture. Unfortunately his health caught up with him and we downsized our 3000sf house into one that is 1750sf. What a perfect choice. In December 2015 at age 71, he quietly slipped away while in a coma. He spent his 20 years of retirement living exactly as he wanted (so did I).

Now I'm by myself,and financially secure due to the sacrifices made early in his working life. It's strange to be alone, knowing every decision is on my shoulders and that I have no one to answer to but me. Funny, I can negotiate for a new car quite well ...lol.

I travel, sometimes alone a few times with friends, but nothing is going to slow this old lady down. I do what I want when I want and life is good.

Kitty
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
<<Vermonter (poorer but happy on our ridge here in Vermont)>>


So what would you do with more money?


Personally, I have a lot more money available to spend than I have any interest in spending.


Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 8
"So what would you do with more money?"

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

people keep telling me I should not do the yard work - I should
hire a lawn service.
But then, I wouldn't know about the snake down by the neighbor's
garden. I wouldn't know where the ant hills have moved to. The
yellow jackets nests would become much more established before I
accidentally stepped in the hole. I would not find the vines growing
up the trees and the house and the porch.
also, I would not have the fun of repairing the mower every spring and
about 4 or 5 weeks during the summer.

Howie52
People do not always recognize what "fun" is to others.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
"also, I would not have the fun of repairing the mower every spring and
about 4 or 5 weeks during the summer." - Howie52, "People do not always recognize what "fun" is to others."

----------------


For years we had a young man (Caleb) mow our lawn but he got married and quit the lawn mowing business after he graduated from college so I decided I needed the exercise and decided to do it myself. We did have an old little mower that I used for a couple of years. I bought it from a neighbor for $40.00. The rings were bad and it was too much $$ to fix it. We tried everything else, we could think of to try and keep it going. So I just bought a new Murray mower from Walmart for $158.00 + tax. It's a push mower and it has a 125 cc Briggs and Stratton engine. It's enough for our lawn. I mow it in sections, ~ 1/3/day. I've used it one time so far.

So far so good.

Art
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
What would I/we do? Heck, I dunno.

Maybe eat good steak dinners out more often... or something stupid like that.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
People do not always recognize what "fun" is to others.

I do not consider mowing the lawn in 90 degree, 100% humidity Houston weather "fun". I discontinued this "fun" years ago when my wife told me I should get someone to mow the lawn for me. She didn't have to tell me twice. I guarantee you.

Regards,

ImAGolfer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
"I do not consider mowing the lawn in 90 degree, 100% humidity Houston weather "fun". I discontinued this "fun" years ago when my wife told me I should get someone to mow the lawn for me. She didn't have to tell me twice. I guarantee you.

Regards,

ImAGolfer "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Which is why the post included the phrase "to others". Every
individual has a little bit different approach to living and
little bit definition of fun.
Matter of fact just having a yard in Houston might be something
unique and might be fun for folks to decide where to plant
what.

heat and humidity is routine in the southeast US - but the tropical
heat tends to be worse round the Gulf coast plus along the east coast
where the gulf stream rules. But as in all things - people do also need
to recognize when "fun" becomes too much of a good thing. We had 95F temps
round here today and I stopped mowing as soon as I got the longest weeds
cut down to size.

Howie52
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Golfer:"I do not consider mowing the lawn in 90 degree, 100% humidity Houston weather "fun". I discontinued this "fun" years ago when my wife told me I should get someone to mow the lawn for me. She didn't have to tell me twice. I guarantee you."

Same in north TX where the grass needs mowing every week since you have to water it to keep it from dying.

Pay the guys $25/week to cut the grass.

Then I can take off for weeks at a time and travel...and not worry about foot high grass when I return.

Same for the pool starting last year...pool service.....always pristine clear water....it used to murk up after I was away for 3 weeks......algae........

Fun is not yard work.

My neighbor is always putting around his yard......guess he likes to do that. not me.



t.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
But we have to ask. How's the golf in 90 degree, 100% humidity Houston. Do you still make it to the links in summer? Early morning?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
pauleckler asks,

How's the golf in 90 degree, 100% humidity Houston.

</snip>


When I lived in Houston, my preferred tee time was 2 PM. At that hour, the heat and humidity has chased everyone else off the course and you can play 18 holes in 2-1/2 hrs.

intercst
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
But we have to ask. How's the golf in 90 degree, 100% humidity Houston. Do you still make it to the links in summer? Early morning?

The golf is pretty rough lately but it's a lot better than going to work. We tee off at sun-up. Around 6:00 AM. We're done by 9:30 but even so it is "HOT". No breeze and very high humidity.

I won $9 this morning so I was happy. We play for $3 and you would think we were playing for $3k. Those $3 have been back and forth hundreds of times over the years. We play it down to USGA rules and to handicaps. Unfortunately I have a VERY high handicap and that doesn't set to well with the guys I play with however when I lose it's entirely OK.

Putting has been problematical lately because we put in new grass on our greens (mini-Verde) and they are VERY fast. Not unusual to have 2 or 3 three putts per round.

Fairways & Greens,

ImAGolfer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
<<What would I/we do? Heck, I dunno.

Maybe eat good steak dinners out more often... or something stupid like that. >>


It's true --- a good restaurant can usually fix a better meal than I can fix myself. For 1/4 the cost and bother.


Not worthwhile to me unless I'm entertaining someone who will appreciate that, or a special treat that I will enjoy.

Usually I'm happy with the meals I fix myself.


Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 8
For me it's not golf or bridge that helps fill my days. I volunteer 3 days per week for a total of 24 hours per week at the local VA Medical Center in Fayetteville, AR. My job is to be at the welcome desk of the hospital and if I had to have a title it would be called concierge as that's what I actually do......

I don't solve the problems, I get them to the people who can. Since my late DH was a disabled Vietnam vet, it is a way for me to give back to the VA for all that they did for him all those years and the benefits they are still providing for me as his widow.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
My wife's a helluva chef, but we both enjoy a great dinner prepared by someone else in a nice, quiet restaurant!

Vermonter
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 5
we both enjoy a great dinner prepared by someone else in a nice, quiet restaurant!

Sadly, quiet restaurants seem hard to find.

I heard a restauranteur tell Charlie Rose that the young crowd likes noisy places. They see them as being lively. But those of us with hearing problems find it overwhelming.

Here's a vote for more quiet restaurants. Necessary if they want my business.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
pauleckler asks,

How's the golf in 90 degree, 100% humidity Houston.

</snip>

When I lived in Houston, my preferred tee time was 2 PM. At that hour, the heat and humidity has chased everyone else off the course and you can play 18 holes in 2-1/2 hrs.

intercst

i bet you weren't walking and carrying your own clubs! lol
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
pauleckler:

We go out to dine for the ambiance and service, as well as the food. We cannot imagine why people would voluntarily want to eat surrounded by noisy and obnoxious people!

To each his/her own, I guess...

Vermonter
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
cgrinder writes,

i bet you weren't walking and carrying your own clubs! lol

</snip>


I did walk carrying a light bag. I was trying to get at least a little exercise. As long as you drink enough water, it's fine.

intercst
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
For me it's not golf or bridge that helps fill my days. I volunteer 3 days per week for a total of 24 hours per week at the local VA Medical Center in Fayetteville, AR. My job is to be at the welcome desk of the hospital and if I had to have a title it would be called concierge as that's what I actually do......

Small world. I also volunteer at a hospital. One afternoon a week I drive a golf cart around the parking lots and professional buildings and hospital carrying folks to their cars or to their doctor appointments. During the Summer months I hang around the Information desk in one of the office buildings soaking up the A/C (soaking up the heat in the Winter months).

Regards,

ImAGolfer (retired '03)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
but nothing is going to slow this old lady down. I do what I want when I want and life is good.

Kitty, what an inspirational post!! My DLH died when I was 50. Unfortunately, we missed out on retirement together, but like you, I am happy and do as I please. 81 and still going strong.

Best of luck to you!

Birgit
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
I think 80 is the new 50.

db
81
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
I think 80 is the new 50.

db
81


Can we agree on 60?

CNC
79
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
"I think 80 is the new 50.

db
81

Can we agree on 60?

CNC
79 "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

80 is the new 60?
60 is the new 50?

Howie52
BTW - if you try that logic if you are pulled over for speeding, you
will be informed about the basic flaw in that logic in either case.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Bobcatkitty,

My brother died in Oct 2015, five years after he and his wife retired to NW Arkansas from the Texas Hill Country. She is very content with the location and involved with community activities. I just returned home from three weeks up there helping her out after she had emergency brain surgery for a benign pituitary tumor. I liked the lushness of the area--her home is lovely--but did not enjoy for even a second driving on those steep and winding roads. She loves it, though.

All the best to you!

Chili
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 10
ChiliChild...I forgot to add a few things: I now attend church after a 50 year absence, and the roof didn't cave in when I walked in that first day. I now also sing in the Senior Adult Choir, and our latest gig was singing the National Anthem for our AAA Baseball team called the Naturals.

Since my DH was a Veteran and died from his Service Connected disabilities, I now volunteer 3 days per week (total 21 hours) at the Veterans Health Care System of the Ozarks in Fayetteville, Ar. It's a simple way for me to attempt to give back to the VA all it gave to my DH and is still providing to me today..

I live in a small brick home that we built in 2013 in an over 55 Community just north of Fayetteville, all single family homes and our only amenity is a 2700 sf club house. It's not a retirement place and besides the clubhouse nothing else is offered. We currently have 17 ladies here that are widows, and 2 widowers.

My son , DIL and 3 grandkids live 400 miles from here but I think nothing of getting in the car and heading northbound on I-49 and I-29. I even flew to Florida last year for a month to stay with a friend. First class r/t and a limo picking me up and taking to me to and from the airport.

Life is too short to sit and wring my hands wallowing in self pity and sorrow. The good Lord gave me courage and a brain and has since told me to use both of them and get busy....life's awaiting.
Print the post Back To Top