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No. of Recommendations: 1
https://invest5.com
Joel Greenblatt’s new “passion”.

Investors can invest as little as $5 per day. Can have a custodial account for your kids or grandkids. There’s going to be an Invest5 University to teach investing.

All money is invested in the Gotham Enhanced S&P 500 Index Fund (GSPFX), a value-weighted S&P500 fund. Expense ratio 0.5%. The fund has done well so far.

The goal of the fund is to do better than the cap weighted S&P500 index with minimal tracking error.

I liked the idea of a value-weighted S&P500 fund when Greenblatt wrote about it in his book “The Big Secret...”. Happy to see him promoting it at last and opening it up to investors of very limited means. Only concern is the AUM, which is tiny at present ($6m).
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Investors can invest as little as $5 per day. Can have a custodial account for your kids or grandkids. There’s going to be an Invest5 University to teach investing.

All money is invested in the Gotham Enhanced S&P 500 Index Fund (GSPFX), a value-weighted S&P500 fund. Expense ratio 0.5%. The fund has done well so far.

The goal of the fund is to do better than the cap weighted S&P500 index with minimal tracking error.

I liked the idea of a value-weighted S&P500 fund when Greenblatt wrote about it in his book “The Big Secret...”. Happy to see him promoting it at last and opening it up to investors of very limited means. Only concern is the AUM, which is tiny at present ($6m).


I would probably tend to say "Good luck with that!" in terms of outperforming the S&P 500 cap weighted over time. Especially since it has a .5% ER for the equal weighted Gotham fund compared to .03% for Vanguard's S&P 500 cap weighted, or the cap weighted iShares 500 that also has a .03% ER., or even Fidelity's ZERO Large Cap fund with 0% ER fees.

BB
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I would probably tend to say "Good luck with that!" in terms of outperforming the S&P 500 cap weighted over time.

The last few years have been terrible for value investors. They've generally been crushed by the S&P500.

CAGR January 2017 - October 2020
GSPFX 12.79% (Gotham Enhanced S&P 500 Index Fund)
SPY 12.47%
Berkshire 5.75%
Value ETF VTV 5.31%

That's after all fees, of course. GSPFX had slightly lower standard deviation.

Early days, shows promise.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
The last few years have been terrible for value investors. They've generally been crushed by the S&P500.
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"Terrible?" I've always considered myself a "value investor." My overall portfolio hit an all-time high last February, then crashed and since came most of the way back, just like the "growth" investors have done.

"Crushed?" I don't feel crushed if I'm making what I consider to be a good return, just because somebody took another approach and did better. I'm not competing with that person, or anyone, really. I'm in it to do the best I can, in a way I feel comfortable with.

I've just about always aimed for a balanced portfolio with an asset allocation of about 70% stocks and 30% fixed income. I never beat the S&P 500 when it's having a good day; I almost always do when it's having a bad day.

The pure stock market indexes are not something I try to compete with. The only metric that I seriously compare my portfolio to is the annual return on the Fidelity Puritan Fund. I use this because:
1. It's a balanced fund, though they aim for an asset allocation within a band of about 60-40% stocks vs. bonds.
2. When I started investing with practically no money, that was my first investment in my IRA.

Bill
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No. of Recommendations: 2
I don't feel crushed if I'm making what I consider to be a good return, just because somebody took another approach and did better.

Congratulations on your maturity. I feel inadequate unless my profits are better than the highest claim on Saul's board. After all, retirement should be entertaining.

-IGU-
(first year being "adequate"; thank you TSLA)
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Congratulations on your maturity. I feel inadequate unless my profits are better than the highest claim on Saul's board. After all, retirement should be entertaining

Portfolio envy will just leave you Hangry. :)

Andy
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No. of Recommendations: 1
My overall portfolio hit an all-time high last February,

Mine too. I was up 16.7% YTD at that point.

then crashed

Mine too. I was down 14.6% YTD then.

and since came most of the way back,

I've done a bit better than most of the way. At market close Friday I was up 58% YTD. That is without allowing for the 8.5% that I withdrew.

just like the "growth" investors have done.

It has been an incredible year for at least some growth investors, including myself. I've never seen anything like it, and don't expect to ever see it's like again. If I hadn't had it happen to me I probably wouldn't have credited it as being possible.
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I've done a bit better than most of the way. At market close Friday I was up 58% YTD. That is without allowing for the 8.5% that I withdrew.
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Good for you! That is tremendous. Without asking too much for details, could you tell us what, say, your three or so best stocks have been?

Like I said before, I have a pretty value-oriented portfolio, but I have some stocks that have done well actually because of the pandemic: Clorox, Kimberly-Clark, Home Depot, and Walmart.

Bill.
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You didn't ask me, but COST is one of my strongest performers. GOOG is doing pretty well also. My stop-losses mostly triggered last spring, so that preserved most of my gains. COST didn't (it was the only one that didn't). I've been trickling money back in to the market, and mostly I'm up again. COST is a juggernaut. I can't say it's "gang-busters", like a growth stock like CRWD (which I'm also long for the past few months), but it seems to be a pretty steady powerhouse.

1poorguy
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Without asking too much for details, could you tell us what, say, your three or so best stocks have been?

I am retired, but it should be clearly understood that I have never invested in the way the retired are told to invest. I've never owned a bond, for example, and other than cash I am 100% in stocks. Early in September I converted 16% of my IRA stocks to cash to give me a 5 year cash cushion. I am also keep a very active eye on it all, though I make changes slowly.

Netflix and Amazon have been my two largest positions for years, and both have done very well with COVID. Along with Apple, that trio make up about 40% of the stocks in my portfolio. Another 20% are mostly past picks by TMF services. One that has performed very well this year is Trex. Another is Tesla.

I started dabbling a bit in Saul stocks about two years ago. One that I bought in September and October of 2019 was Zoom, before it became a verb. I added to it this year. Saul posts his positions around the end of each month, and I am heavily influenced by what he holds.

In January I reworked my ROTH, about 13% of my stock holdings at the time, and made it all Saul stocks. My ROTH is up 118% YTD. Right now Saul stocks make up about 40% across all accounts.
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