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Is the calculator recommending you fill the W-4 'married filing jointly' and then doing that? That very well be much the same thing as filing 'single' and claiming one exemption.

The thing is that the 'MFJ' brackets are much greater, but when you have two of you working, that effect is basically removed - so you'll need up up your deductions just to stay where you are (unless you keep your W-4 as single, which is an option too).

Two people working getting married should leave them in roughly the same shape, all told. You might see some minor different after a taxable income of $130K or so, but it'll be small for a while (remember after the standard deduction and personal exemptions, you're definitely not of $130K worth of taxable income).


What I would suggest you do, if you really want to be sure, is the following:
Take your expected gross income, subtract the MFJ standard deduction and two personal exemptions (unless you expect to itemize or have some reason to suspect fewer (or greater ;) ) number of exemptions). Also subtract 401K contributions and anything else you expect to deduct.

Then use this page to calculate your total tax due for the year on your MFJ income (it also shows deduction and exemption numbers):
http://www.edwardjones.com/cgi/getHTML.cgi?page=/USA/resources/tax/brackets_this_year.html


Then, go to PayCheckCity.com and use their Paycheck Calculator (under Personal Calculators). Enter your information, as well as your intended W-4 information, and see how much it tells you will be deducted per pay period. Multiply that times your number of pay periods in a year and see if its about right.


Oh, and congratulations!
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