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Adapt.

It is what survivors do.

:)
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already doing that, I am planting trees, and starting plants inside early like watermelon and squash that I used to be able to plant as seed outside after frost. It get too hot for some of those plants for them to set fruit if you do not give them a head start.

I am adapting my life for global warming. Others will be migrating or dying where they are. People are going to be moving on a massive scale unless we are able to slow global warming. No walls no armies are going to stop the movement of millions of people across borders when their choices are to die where they are or have a chance if they move....
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Careful with watermelons and squash. They can rot very easily.
Plus varmints love them.

Howie52
Used to take the kids to a pumpkin patch near Erie,Pa in the fall months
that put a few squirrel and woodchuck "carved' pumpkins on display.
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https://www.yahoo.com/news/june-warmest-june-ever-recorded-1......

Ayup! Tends to do that every summer.

¦ Desert (Earth has been warming and cooling without human help for millions of years.) Dave
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<<
Ayup! Tends to do that every summer.

¦ Desert (Earth has been warming and cooling without human help for millions of years.) Dave

>>

The Arctic, Antarctic, are warming much faster that the rest of the earth.

I agree that the earth warms and cools over 1000s of years... Usually that is because of a cataclysmic event such as a super volcano or a meteor strike. The effects of those can be immediate but short duration effects.

This warming trend is caused by build up of green house gases, the buffers of the ocean absorbing CO2 and the accumulated ice are getting at their limit. The permafrost is beginning to melt which if it melt completely will release enough CO2 and methane to .... we do not know what it will do.... But it will be hot, sea levels will rise dramatically, mass migrations of people and animals will occur.
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.... we do not know what it will do....

Ah! You see, there is a middle ground upon which we can agree.

Dave
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.... we do not know what it will do....
><
Ah! You see, there is a middle ground upon which we can agree.

Dave
>>

I do not think we agree.... we do not have the data to know what large quantities of methane will do in the atmosphere. We know that methane is a more potent green house gas than CO2. There is a rumor that large amounts of methane accumulate in the depths of the oceans and there is some fears that the warming ocean will cause some of that to release. Some say that there may be liquid methane there because of the pressure. But if the oceans continue to warm the temperature pressure combination may no longer maintain the methane in a liquid state.
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From eastern Siberia to Greenland to Alaska, wildfires are burning. While it isn't uncommon for these areas to see wildfires, there is cause for concern now, Thomas Smith, an assistant professor in environmental geography at the London School of Economics, told USA TODAY.

"The magnitude is unprecedented in the 16-year satellite record," said Smith. "The fires appear to be further north than usual, and some appear to have ignited peat soils."

What they're looking for in the satellite images, Smith said, are hot spots across a very large area that can indicate peat fires. Peat fires – unlike regular forest fires, which last only an hour or so before moving on – last for days or months. The longevity of these fires is because peat burns down into the soil.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/thanks-climate-change-parts-arcti...
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The Arctic, Antarctic, are warming much faster that the rest of the earth.

The Arctic, yes. The Antarctic, no.

There is a rumor that large amounts of methane accumulate in the depths of the oceans and there is some fears that the warming ocean will cause some of that to release.

There are indeed large amounts of methane clathrates on the ocean floor; the Japanese have even done some test mining. The world will never run out of natural gas. The USGS looked into the possibility of large releases:

Gas Hydrate Breakdown Unlikely to Cause Massive Greenhouse Gas Release
www.usgs.gov/news/gas-hydrate-breakdown-unlikely-cause-massi...
The breakdown of methane hydrates due to warming climate is unlikely to lead to massive amounts of methane being released to the atmosphere, according to a recent interpretive review of scientific literature performed by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Rochester....

However, not only are the annual emissions of methane to the ocean from degrading gas hydrates far smaller than greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere from human activities, but most of the methane released by gas hydrates never reaches the atmosphere. Instead, the methane often remains in the undersea sediments, dissolves in the ocean, or is converted to carbon dioxide by microbes in the sediments or water column.

The review pays particular attention to gas hydrates beneath the Arctic Ocean....

DB2
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You are correct, I was looking at sea water temps which is causing the degradation of the ice shelves.

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In comparison, the rise in temperatures over the last century have been felt over 98 percent of Earth’s surface. The only exception is Antartica, where “contemporary warming has not yet been observed over the entire continent,” ABC of Australia noted.

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/no-doubt-humans-causing-...
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