No. of Recommendations: 3
1/3 of Japan’s population is over 60. Japan is a very homogeneous nation. 98.5% Japanese descent.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2018/12/04/commentary/j...
the revision will create new visa statuses that will enable foreign workers to be employed for unskilled labor in Japan. This is a major departure from the policy of accepting a limited number of foreign workers with specialized, highly professional skills.

The government plans to create two new visa statuses. The first is for foreign workers having a certain level of skill. They can stay in Japan for up to five years but will not be allowed to bring their family members. The second is for workers with a higher level of skill who would be allowed to bring their spouses and children. If certain conditions are met, they could be permitted to live in Japan indefinitely.

Japan introduces unskilled foreign workers with the myopic view of overcoming its labor shortage — a short-term problem — a new third social class made up of foreigners (after Japanese men and women) could come into being, thus increasing social discord and friction
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Japan introduces unskilled foreign workers with the myopic view of overcoming its labor shortage — a short-term problem — a new third social class made up of foreigners (after Japanese men and women) could come into being, thus increasing social discord and friction

They also need to revise their naturalization laws - so that people who meet whatever qualifications are set in law WILL be accepted as citizens. Their current law (as I understand it) is that people meeting requirements MAY be accepted, at the discretion of a certain minister and his/her staff, with no right of appeal anywhere for rejections.

And they don't have birthplace citizenship either. There are families that have lived nowhere but Japan for three or four generations and can't persuade the government to let them become citizens. Nothing inherently wrong with bloodline citizenship (every country has SOME of it, that's why a person born to US citizen parents outside the US typically is considered a US citizen), but it needs to be combined with sane laws and attitudes regarding naturalization.
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No. of Recommendations: 7
<<but it needs to be combined with sane laws and attitudes regarding naturalization.>>


No, it doesn't.

As I understand it, the Japanese law will permit foreign people to work in Japan for a five year term, after which they are expected to return to their home country. A Japanese "Bracero" program, if you will.

Of course, that will get complicated when those folks marry and have children with Japanese nationals while working in Japan. One can imagine such temporary workers playing every available angle to stay in Japan despite the expiration of their permit, just as happens in the United States. But there is no reason you can't have a system of temporary residency.

And I doubt that Japan will have judges busily undermining the law as happens routinely in the United States. They may actually decide to enforce it with some rigor.


Seattle Pioneer
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