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No. of Recommendations: 7
Dear Fools: I've lost a lot of faith in The Motley Fool of late. I was especially disheartened by their decisions to sell JDSU and Yahoo, because, repectively, they thought JDSU lacked intergrity of management and that Yahoo was too risky. I don't fault The Motley Fool for admitting mistakes and take some of the blame myself, but just 9 months ago they were exhorting the value of these stocks as must haves, apparently caught up in the hysteria of "momentum investing". Before they identify a stock as being a Rule Breaker or Maker, they should check out the company thoroughly, as they suggest other's do. They should think twice before making a recommendation! They are not true deciples of Warren Buffet, Benjamin Graham, or Philip Fisher; they are just additional opinion givers;we are one our own! Regards, JohnLaw
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No. of Recommendations: 6
Dear Fools: I've lost a lot of faith in The Motley Fool of late.

This is probably a healthy thing. You need to realize that the Fools at TMF are no more
qualified to judge stocks than you are. And, they are no more immune from
the temptation to get caught up in the herd mentality of the market.

But, really, isn't that the message of TMF? "Don't rely on others to make your investment
decisions for you. Do your own research. Take charge of your own finances." I think
TMF would welcome the "loss of faith" if that meant more people did their own homework.
If you really buy into the message, whether TMF sells Yahoo! and JDSU or not will not affect
your portfolio. If you bought JDSU because of your own due diligence and you still
believe in the company, hang on to it. Don't just follow the Fool. They have been saying
that themselves all along. Yes, losing faith in the Fool is a good thing...

PG
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No. of Recommendations: 2
But, really, isn't that the message of TMF? "Don't rely on others to make your investment
decisions for you. Do your own research. Take charge of your own finances."


That's almost the message of TMF. The whole message is more or less "Don't rely on others to make your investment
decisions for you. Do your own research. Take charge of your own finances. And you can easily do better than the "wise" investment managers." People lose faith when they discover that it ain't so easy. In fact, it's damn hard.

Elan
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