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Got in last night and still too jet-lagged to post anything coherent. Except to say in response to arrete that yes, we did spend a little time in the Znojmo area.

--fleg
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Well when you get unjetlagged RoadScholar want a word with you ;0).
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welcome back man.
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BTW, why do they call it "jet lag"? The jet hasn't lagged....it got you to your destination on time. It's really the time lag. Well, come to think of it, the time isn't lagging either. It is what it should be separated by the proper time zones. It's really the body lag due to the travel.....and come to think of it, the body isn't "lagging". It's really just fatigued from the lack of regular sleep. You could just as well have "jet lag" if you hadn't ever left your house.
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Melatonin, use it every time I travel overseas. Cuts the jet lag time in half. Although DW can't take because it gives her nightmares.

I do find it easier going east to west though.

JLC
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BTW, why do they call it "jet lag"?... It's really just fatigued from the lack of regular sleep.

It's short for "jet lagniappe," the little something extra that comes with modern travel.

And it's not just fatigue. The abrupt change in the cycle of light and dark affects the body differently than just a lack of sleep. Even if adequate sleep is obtained, say, while on the jet, many or most people will still experience it. And that explains the "jet" -- because without a jet, you couldn't jump enough time zones fast enough to experience the change in the light/dark cycle.

You could just as well have "jet lag" if you hadn't ever left your house.

Tell me about it. I get jet lag just from the one-hour changes going onto and off of daylight savings.

--fleg
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"Melatonin, use it every time I travel overseas. Cuts the jet lag time in half. Although DW can't take because it gives her nightmares. I do find it easier going east to west though." JLC


I'm a melatonin fan too. It does make me dream but they aren't reall nightmares. Just very vivid lucid dreams. I don't take it all the time, only when I need to get to sleep early. Since I've retired my sleep schedule is sort of messed, going to be late and sleeping late. Sometimes I need to get up early and that's when I take melatonin. I bought a big bottle of it at Sam's Club.

Art
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welcome back fleg, just in time for football! :)

LuckyDog
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BTW, why do they call it "jet lag"? The jet hasn't lagged....it got you to your destination on time. It's really the time lag.


Why do they call it Ovaltine? The jar is round, the mug is round... they should call it Roundtine.
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Tell me about it. I get jet lag just from the one-hour changes going onto and off of daylight savings.


I get jet lag when I have to get out of bed hours earlier than usual in order to make a doctor appointment across town.
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Why do they call it Ovaltine? The jar is round, the mug is round... they should call it Roundtine.

Maybe because if you drink enough, you will develop an oval body shape. And what's with the "tine" thing? It has nothing to do with the prongs of forks or combs, does it? It should really be called Diabetes Powder:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovaltine

The popular chocolate malt version is a powder which is mixed with hot or cold milk as a beverage. Malt Ovaltine (a version without cocoa) and Rich Chocolate Ovaltine (a version without malt) are also available in some markets. Ovaltine has also been available in the form of chocolate bars, chocolate Easter eggs, parfait, cookies, and breakfast cereals, where it is only the brand name that connects the cereals with the chocolate drink.
________________

Consume at your peril.

--fleg
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I get jet lag when I have to get out of bed hours earlier than usual in order to make a doctor appointment across town.

Aren't there any doctors in Chicago who see patients in the afternoon?

--fleg
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I get jet lag when I have to get out of bed hours earlier than usual in order to make a doctor appointment across town.


Aren't there any doctors in Chicago who see patients in the afternoon?

--fleg



Fleg, Dan's breakfast is our dinner.
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The popular chocolate malt version is a powder which is mixed with hot or cold milk as a beverage. Malt Ovaltine (a version without cocoa) and Rich Chocolate Ovaltine (a version without malt) are also available in some markets. Ovaltine has also been available in the form of chocolate bars, chocolate Easter eggs, parfait, cookies, and breakfast cereals, where it is only the brand name that connects the cereals with the chocolate drink.
________________

Consume at your peril.

--fleg



I've never even had the stuff. I've never had Bosco either. I was raised on Nestle's Quik -- loved both the chocolate and strawberry flavors. Haven't even had that in more than 30 years.
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Fleg, Dan's breakfast is our dinner.


Pretty much. My main meal of the day is my first one most of the time -- and is usually eaten at a restaurant around midafternoon, typically two to three hours after I've gotten out of bed.
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I've never even had the stuff. I've never had Bosco either. I was raised on Nestle's Quik -- loved both the chocolate and strawberry flavors. Haven't even had that in more than 30 years.


My sis and I were raised on Nestle Quik as well....chocolate and strawberry...YUM!. Back in the 1980's I remember them only in powder form. Of course, I was mischievious enough to sneak a spoonful of the powder into my mouth directly without milk. Sugar Shock!! But damn good.

However, I really can't remember when...but at some time I do remember we had Ovaltine for a short period of time in the home...definitely when we were older...maybe when I was home from college for short periods?? don't remember. I think my dad got it because it was "more nutritious"....LOL
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Pretty much. My main meal of the day is my first one most of the time -- and is usually eaten at a restaurant around midafternoon, typically two to three hours after I've gotten out of bed. --andrew

I'm getting like that. Today I got up about 6am, had a cup of coffee, a hard boiled egg with lots of black pepper and some salt, and a glass of V-8 at about 8:30, and then went back to bed about 11 and slept until almost 2. Then I had my second cup of coffee and fixed lunch around 4, a slice of meatloaf, a baked potato and some mixed vegetable with a southwest twist (which means they added some black beans).

I still haven't had dinner and it's after 10 o'clock, but I'll probably be up until 2 or 3 so I'll fix it in an hour or two. Something light, maybe a cottage cheese and fruit salad. I had a peach earlier and some of those little rice cake things with some Alouette soft cheese.

If I still lived in San Francisco I'd be just like andrew and go out about 2pm to some tasty cafe, mostly ethnic, that served delicious food at one or two star prices. Then I'd also go to a favorite take out place--either a cafe or a great grocery store like Trader Joe's and bring home dinner for later. I would never run out of choices, old favorites or new places to try. When I finished with San Francisco, which would be never, I'd continue on down the peninsula or across the Bridge to Marin or across to the East Bay, or up and down Highway 1 stopping to eat at every place off the Pacific Ocean.

As it is I have about 14 choices of places to eat out here, and that includes the college cafeteria/food mall and the two gas stations with their convenience stores that sell steamed polish sausage, and the fast food places, all 3 of them. I have all 14 menus memorized from top to bottom and paper copies when I can get them. I could drive to Hay Springs where there are 2 places to eat or to Crawford where there are two more--otherwise I have to drive 60 miles to Alliance or Hot Springs and that is quite a ways to go to lunch.

Although my mother and 3 of her single friends used to drive to Gordon, 40 miles east, on Christmas Day because everything was closed in Chadron--you couldn't get anything to eat anywhere if you didn't feel like eating at home, well maybe one gas station stayed open. There's a good cafe in Gordon--I should drive over there and try it out one of these days. I wonder if now that WalMart has come to town if that everything-closes-on-Christmas-Day-so-employees-can-have-the-day-off tradition is still in effect--I'll check some day. I still find it amazing that WalMart stays open 24 hours a day in our little town and wonders whoever shops there in the middle of the night. Night owls like me I suppose.
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"Why do they call it Ovaltine? The jar is round, the mug is round... they should call it Roundtine.

Maybe because if you drink enough, you will develop an oval body shape. And what's with the "tine" thing? It has nothing to do with the prongs of forks or combs, does it? It should really be called Diabetes Powder:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovaltine

The popular chocolate malt version is a powder which is mixed with hot or cold milk as a beverage. Malt Ovaltine (a version without cocoa) and Rich Chocolate Ovaltine (a version without malt) are also available in some markets. Ovaltine has also been available in the form of chocolate bars, chocolate Easter eggs, parfait, cookies, and breakfast cereals, where it is only the brand name that connects the cereals with the chocolate drink.
---------------------------------------------------------
Consume at your peril." --fleg

-------------

You've mentioned your Jewishness and how you aren't a practicing Jew but in one way you have maintained your Jewishness and that's in your constant worrying about what goes into your mouth. What is it with Jews and all those food laws and dietary restrictions? Seinfeld was always worried about what he ate or what went into his mouth too?

My niece is teaching at a Kosher Jewish school in Panama and they aren't allowed to bring any food into the school and the school provides the meals because they want to control what everyone eats.

I pretty much live by the adage "It's not what goes into a man's mouth that defiles him but what comes out of it."

Artie
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You've mentioned your Jewishness and how you aren't a practicing Jew but in one way you have maintained your Jewishness and that's in your constant worrying about what goes into your mouth. What is it with Jews and all those food laws and dietary restrictions? Seinfeld was always worried about what he ate or what went into his mouth too?


One of my longtime friends is Jewish. I've known him for 30 years now and I've never observed him paying attention to any sort of dietary restrictions -- seems to me that he eats whatever he darned well pleases. Then again, he is Reform Jewish, which I think are the most liberal of all the different kinds of Jews.

I think fleg's watching what he eats derives mostly from health concerns.
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"I think fleg's watching what he eats derives mostly from health concerns." - Andrew


I'm pretty sure if you ask any Jew about their dietary restrictions that would be their answer. I worked next door to this little skinny Jewish guy and he told me he didn't eat pork not because of religious reasons but it "just didn't agree with him." I just raised my eyebrows at that one.

Meat is meat. Biochemically there is very little difference and modern day pigs have been genetically selected to be lean and since pigs don't "marble" (intramuscular fat) like cows do pork is actually less fatty than beef. If you buy pork that hasn't been cured or smoked it is just as, if not more, healthy than beef.

Art
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You've mentioned your Jewishness and how you aren't a practicing Jew but in one way you have maintained your Jewishness and that's in your constant worrying about what goes into your mouth. What is it with Jews and all those food laws and dietary restrictions? Seinfeld was always worried about what he ate or what went into his mouth too?

Quite a few of those dietary laws make at least some sense in the context in which they were originally promulgated. But then they became part of the religion and maintained even though they no longer make so much sense. (And some of them, in my opinion, got stretched to absurdity)...

Pork: There are two good reasons why the ancient Jews should avoid pork. The one we recognize today is trichinosis. The other is that anything a pig can eat, YOU can eat. Pigs are a direct competitor for food. And each pound of food the pig eats produces only a fraction of a pound of pork for you to eat. The ancient Jews lived in a land about as densely populated as it could be given their food production and storage technology; feeding a pig meant a human starved. This also shows that the Jews were relatively egalitarian, as many other cultures in the area would let peasants starve so they could raise pigs for the upper classes to eat.

"Fish" without scales (including clams, shrimp, and other things that are not actually fish at all): Quite a lot of these creatures are bottom-dwellers and bottom-feeders. The ancient Jews could only harvest them close to the shore - where they would be at greatest risk of having been exposed to, and still containing, possibly-disease-carrying human and animal feces since the ancient Jews also did not have modern sewage-treatment facilities.

Draining all the blood (that they could) from butchered animals: blood is a wonderful medium for growing bacteria. It also spoils much faster than mostly-drained meat. When you have no refrigeration, draining the blood lets you store the meat a bit longer.

Not eating the mother's milk and the child at the same meal: Taken literally, I see this as a gesture of respect to the animals (mostly the mother) and perhaps a discouragement to overindulgence when your resources are limited. Not vital, but a decent idea. Taken to the extreme that you can't eat any dairy product at the same meal as any meat and have to bear the expense of separate sets of cookware and dishes (if not separate kitchens) to avoid the risk that a molecule of milk might get into your meat or vice versa... sorry, I can't make sense of that.
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We're still jet lagged on this, the fourth day after our return. It's always worse coming home. Upon arriving in Europe, both this time and when we went to Portugal a couple of years ago, we were able to sightsee right away and were totally adjusted after three days. Coming home last time, it took us nearly a week, as it's doing this time.

Yesterday DW crashed at about 5pm and slept like a dead person until 1am. I crashed around 8:30pm and slept like a dead person until around 1am. It's not from lack of sleep, it's a whole other sensation, like falling into a black hole or having pre-colonoscopy sedation kick in. After lying awake for a few hours, we slept again, from around 3:30 to 6:30am. Since that's a total of seven hours for me and I got up at an approximately normal hour, I'm hoping this is the last weird day. It doesn't matter since we don't have anything to do, but I want to be fully alert when I resume my interpreting duties tomorrow night.

I don't remember how we managed to go back to work a couple of days after vacationing in Europe during our working years, but it had to be brutal.

--fleg
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You've mentioned your Jewishness...


Art...."your Jewishness"??? LOL. Art, feel lucky you got friends here who aren't too caught up being PC. <g>
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I've always referred to myself as a gringa around my son-in-law and his family, who are Peruvians.

This past weekend, someone pointed out to me that it was a racist term.

I don't know what to call myself around Latinos. I am white, but so are many of them. I am American, but so they are as well.

RS - call me Blanca
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Speaking of food, Peruvian places are sprouting up like crazy around here.

Some of the flavors are unique and interesting, but lots of carb loading like rice and potatoes on the same entree or in the same recipe.

RS
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I've always referred to myself as a gringa around my son-in-law and his family, who are Peruvians.

This past weekend, someone pointed out to me that it was a racist term.
----------------------------------------------------------------
Call yourself a Gov't Mulehead <g>.
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<<Call yourself a Gov't Mulehea>>

That I will never deny :)


Big weeks coming up:

October 7th - Mato Nanji and Levi Platero concert - great blues guitarrists. Check them out on YouTube.

October 11th - audience with the Dalai Lama in Charlottesville

October 13th - Jarabe de Palo concert/dance

October 22 - Govt Mule in Richmond


RS
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<<Call yourself a Gov't Mulehea>>

That I will never deny :)


Big weeks coming up:

October 7th - Mato Nanji and Levi Platero concert - great blues guitarrists. Check them out on YouTube.

October 11th - audience with the Dalai Lama in Charlottesville

October 13th - Jarabe de Palo concert/dance

October 22 - Govt Mule in Richmond


RS

>>>>>>>>

hey is that with that guy you've been dating?
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Jarabe de Palo concert/dance

In Spanish that means "stick syrup" or "syrup of the pole" or something similar. Sounds like fun.

--fleg
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Art...."your Jeishness"??? LOL. Art, feel lucky you got friends here who aren't too caught up being PC. <g>


Fleg told us he was Jewish, or of Jewish descent. He also told us that he'd pretty much left that behind. All I did was mention that even though he says he isn't Jewish, I think deep down inside a little bit of his Jewish upbringing is still hiding somewhere deep down inside himself.

I've just noticed that it is part of the Jewish psyche to be deeply concerned with what goes into your mouth. The same thing I think is true of Hindus. I was good friends with an Indian Hindu couple from Gujurat and Maharhisti India. They were both vegetarian and Brahmin Indians and when we went up to the Lake one time and we stopped on an island and had a picnic and they were very concerned something that had touched my fried chicken might touch something they were going to eat. I told them that when they go to restaurants I guarantee you that pots and pans and knives and cutting boards and storage containers were interchangeably mixed and their food had at some point been "touched" by something that had previously touched meat in some way or other.

I just find it hard to relate to this fear or worry about food and what I eat. I will eat anything, including dog or cat (if someone else fixes it) and it's just not a real big deal to me. The only two foods I'm not particularly fond of are sweet potato and lima beans and I will even eat them if that is all there is.

I've eaten snails, road kill rabbit and deer, turtles, snake, pigeons and doves, squirrels, beaver, cows, pigs, sheep, turkeys, ducks, geese, lobsters, crabs, shrimp, crawfish, fish without scales, etc. etc. etc.

In fact I wish I could buy horsemeat and use it in chili and spaghetti. I bet it would be quite tasty.

Art
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"Speaking of food, Peruvian places are sprouting up like crazy around here. Some of the flavors are unique and interesting, but lots of carb loading like rice and potatoes on the same entree or in the same recipe." RS


yeah, that was my experience down in Orlando, Florida. When we were there a year ago we ate at a Peruvian restaurant and the plate we got had potatoes, rice, beans, and bread and like 2 ounces of beef on in it. I didn't like it much because I didn't feel like I was getting any value.

It was like the restaurant was trying to maximize his profits and he was doing it by scamming us. I wouldn't go back there. I'd rather eat at a Chinese buffet which was cheaper and I could eat shrimp and clams and avoid the starches.

Artie
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Art...."your Jeishness"??? LOL. Art, feel lucky you got friends here who aren't too caught up being PC. <g>


Fleg told us he was Jewish, or of Jewish descent. He also told us that he'd pretty much left that behind. All I did was mention that even though he says he isn't Jewish, I think deep down inside a little bit of his Jewish upbringing is still hiding somewhere deep down inside himself.

I've just noticed that it is part of the Jewish psyche to be deeply concerned with what goes into your mouth. The same thing I think is true of Hindus. I was good friends with an Indian Hindu couple from Gujurat and Maharhisti India. They were both vegetarian and Brahmin Indians and when we went up to the Lake one time and we stopped on an island and had a picnic and they were very concerned something that had touched my fried chicken might touch something they were going to eat. I told them that when they go to restaurants I guarantee you that pots and pans and knives and cutting boards and storage containers were interchangeably mixed and their food had at some point been "touched" by something that had previously touched meat in some way or other.

I just find it hard to relate to this fear or worry about food and what I eat. I will eat anything, including dog or cat (if someone else fixes it) and it's just not a real big deal to me. The only two foods I'm not particularly fond of are sweet potato and lima beans and I will even eat them if that is all there is.

I've eaten snails, road kill rabbit and deer, turtles, snake, pigeons and doves, squirrels, beaver, cows, pigs, sheep, turkeys, ducks, geese, lobsters, crabs, shrimp, crawfish, fish without scales, etc. etc. etc.

In fact I wish I could buy horsemeat and use it in chili and spaghetti. I bet it would be quite tasty.

Art

>>>>>>>>>>>>

well art, how 'bout just consider that other people do things differently than you. For instance, I try my best to avoid eating my binge foods because I know from years of experience, weight gain and other health problems, such as knee problems, that I can't stop eating those binge foods. My avoiding them is not exactly a fear, it's akin to avoid stepping into a pothole when I know exactly what's going to happen if I do.

Insanity is doing things over and over again, expecting different results. So, if I eat those foods, I know it's my choice to go down that path again.

Everybody is different, and sometimes, it's hard for me to understand that or to accept it.

LuckyDog
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I think lots of "ethnic" cuisines are carb loaded because historically, that's what humans needed to consume to fuel their physical activity - you know, before machines did the work for us.

My trigger foods are chocolate, nuts, cookies, cake, pie, ice cream and similar.... perhaps maki rolls too (thankfully, sushi rolls, like cocaine are expensive and thus my addiction is self-limiting).

Bags of chips and tubs of pudding could go bad in my household because they don't tempt me...it's weird how we are each different.

A couple years ago, I had a layover at Charles DeGaulle (sp?) airport in the middle of the night. I fell asleep at the gate waiting for my flight to Rome. I suddenly woke up and saw those display cases in the airport - exquisite chocolates, cappuccinos and espressos, macarons, all bright and gleaming, with smartly dressed people rushing past me. For a moment, I thought I was in heaven lol.

RS
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<hey is that with that guy you've been dating?>

He'll be going to a couple of these events with me....I've been fortunate to have had a lot of fun and good times all year, but somewhere along the way, I found myself gravitating toward him more than the other, so thats a good thing.

Thanks for asking. Makes me happy.

RS
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"Everybody is different, and sometimes, it's hard for me to understand that or to accept it." - LuckyDog


It's the whole point of life. We are here to become separate, unique, individuals. Separation can't be learned in Heaven because of those overwhelming holographic feelings of oneness and connectedness.

Art
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