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https://www.npr.org/2019/04/19/715016284/brooklyn-judge-upho...
A Brooklyn judge has sided with New York health officials to uphold a mandatory measles vaccinations order, dismissing a lawsuit from a group of parents who claimed the city had overstepped its authority.

Judge Lawrence Knipel on Thursday refused parents' request to lift the vaccination order that was imposed last week to stem a severe measles outbreak. "A fireman need not obtain the informed consent of the owner before extinguishing a house fire," Knipel wrote in his ruling as quoted by Gothamist. "Vaccination is known to extinguish the fire of contagion."
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I have trouble understanding these anti-vaxxers. I nearly died of measles in 1959.
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<<<< The principle that sustains compulsory vaccination is broad enough to cover cutting the Fallopian tubes.[13]>>
>>>>


<<On May 2, 1927, in an 8–1 decision, the Court accepted that Buck, her mother and her daughter were "feeble-minded" and "promiscuous,"[12] and that it was in the state's interest to have her sterilized. The ruling legitimized Virginia's sterilization procedures until they were repealed in 1974.


Justice Holmes in the year of his appointment to the United States Supreme Court
The ruling was written by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. In support of his argument that the interest of "public welfare" outweighed the interest of individuals in their bodily integrity, he argued:

We have seen more than once that the public welfare may call upon the best citizens for their lives. It would be strange if it could not call upon those who already sap the strength of the State for these lesser sacrifices, often not felt to be such by those concerned, to prevent our being swamped with incompetence. It is better for all the world, if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind. The principle that sustains compulsory vaccination is broad enough to cover cutting the Fallopian tubes.[13]>>






Yet ANOTHER principle of Progressivism!


Seattle Pioneer
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Seattle Pioneer writes:
Justice Holmes in the year of his appointment to the United States Supreme Court
The ruling was written by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. In support of his argument that the interest of "public welfare" outweighed the interest of individuals in their bodily integrity, he argued:

We have seen more than once that the public welfare may call upon the best citizens for their lives. It would be strange if it could not call upon those who already sap the strength of the State for these lesser sacrifices, often not felt to be such by those concerned, to prevent our being swamped with incompetence. It is better for all the world, if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind. The principle that sustains compulsory vaccination is broad enough to cover cutting the Fallopian tubes.[13]>>




Yet ANOTHER principle of Progressivism!





“Only the shallow would attempt to put Mr. Justice Holmes in the shallow pigeonholes of classification.”
Justice Felix Frankfurter



AW
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<<“Only the shallow would attempt to put Mr. Justice Holmes in the shallow pigeonholes of classification.”
Justice Felix Frankfurter


AW>>



Just quoting not only his actual words, but his written words in his first USSC opinion.


Seattle Pioneer
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I have trouble understanding these anti-vaxxers. I nearly died of measles in 1959.

I fear someone's going to die in this set-to. I heard a radio sound bite of a woman contending that g-d made everyone "perfect" and, therefore, there is no need for vaccinating her children.
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