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I have been on TMF for a while now but never on this board. Then just a few minutes ago it hit me, TMF has a board for just about everything. I get they have one for Diabeties. So I looked and sure enough, there it was.

Anyway, I was just diagnosed back on April 6. Saw a dietitian the day before yesterday. I was a little surpised at some the foods I am still allowed to eat, but boy those portions size are gonna kill me. Though, I guess they are actually supposed to help keep me alive.
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I was a little surpised at some the foods I am still allowed to eat, but boy those portions size are gonna kill me.

Welcome to the board and I am sorry you became one of the millions with Diabetes. Eight years ago I had the same reaction. You learn to manage your diet and it ends up saving your life.

Fuskie
Who notes that your nutritionist's job is to scare you into a radical change in lifestyle and the reality is rarely as bad as the anticipation...
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I was just diagnosed back on April 6.

A little over 2 years for me. The mental part does get better, especially after you see lifestyle changes result in better test results.

On the subject of those test results, don't let those get you down either. It took you x years to get here. It's not going to turn around in x minutes. I'm doing great with the A1C (has actually gone down), kidneys, feet, eyes, BP (with medication) all good, total cholesterol, and LDL good even after they lowered the recommendation again, but still working on HDL and triglycerides.

And my turkeyburger on portobello is really quite tasty.

Phil
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Anyway, I was just diagnosed back on April 6. Saw a dietitian the day before yesterday. I was a little surpised at some the foods I am still allowed to eat, but boy those portions size are gonna kill me. Though, I guess they are actually supposed to help keep me alive.

The key to good blood sugar control is a combination of medicine, diet, and exercise.

Just don't do what I did. I got so discouraged by the limitations, I stopped caring for myself for a few years. Do the best you can but don't feel like your days of enjoying food are over. They aren't.



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I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes ~30 years ago. I will be 59 this coming November. All through the years I had doctors monitoring my health with a myriad of tests via regular visits. All of my test results would come back "perfect" with the occasional little blip now and then the we would keep an "eye" on. Subsequent testing would come back "perfect". Fast forward.

In 1999 I awoke one morning and found I had no feeling in my feet. Doc sez, "Sh*t happens with diabetes and we don't how to fix it." Next came a loss of feeling in my hands. Ironically my regular A1C tests and others said "perfect." And then psoriasis and eczema set in. Finally glaucoma and cataracts.

Today, approaching the tender age 59, I am a homebound disabled person who scoots around on a motorized wheelchair with limited eye sight who doesn't really enjoy sitting in the rear of a mini van outfitted for a handicapped person while my DW of 39 years takes me to my various doctor's appts. I've religiously taken my meds over the many years and followed the doctors advice but still, "Sh*t happens with diabetes and we (the doctors) don't know how to fix it."

God, I feel so sorry for the many, many kids who today are being diagnosed with this friggin' disease! So young. :(

Best regards,
Duane

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Duane, i'm sorry for what has happened to you and yes you are right, it is a shame for all those young kids who didn't even get to 29 before getting type 1. i did just want to add, for the original poster, what was "perfect" 30 years ago, even 20 years ago was probably more along the lines of "as good as you could expect". monitoring was probably infrequent and rudimentary in that time frame and certainly human insulins were unheard of. the pharmacodynamic profiles of the pig and bovine insulins of the time were vastly inferior to the modified human insulins of today and certainly not up to standard of the pumps by any measure. so by what is possible with today's technologies, "perfect" in those days was probably pretty sub-optimal, thus allowing for a higher level of cumulative damage to occur.

in any case, best wishes.
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