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Is (sic) spelled correctly?
~D
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Is (sic) spelled correctly?

Yes, it's Latin, and could be translated as "in this way" or "thus." It is usually used when someone is quoted directly, but used an incorrect spelling. For example, a journalist might write of an "unpresidented (sic) act," inserting the "sic" in parentheses, so that the reader knows that the misspelling is not the journalist's own, but is spelled this way in Trump's original text.

culcha
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So it might have been sic (sick) or sick (sic)?
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"Sic" does mean "thus." And I learned that in such an atypical way, when I was a little kid!

My mother taught it to me when she taught me the phrase "sic sempere tyrannis." It's the motto of Virginia, where my mother had been born and lived--in Newport News--till she left to go to college. (She had one later stint there a little while after she married my dad, which is where I was conceived and born--in Richmond.) I must have een 7 or 8 years old, and she decided to teach me the phrase in Latin and English--"thus always to tyrants." It's on the state seal, flag, everything. And she showed me the stance of the victor with his foot on the chest of the vanquished tyrant lying on the ground, and one arm raised in victory. And she had me imitate it and say the Latin phrase!

Wow--what a memory this unearths, after decades!

=sheila
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"Sic" does mean "thus." And I learned that in such an atypical way, when I was a little kid!

My mother taught it to me when she taught me the phrase "sic sempere tyrannis." It's the motto of Virginia, where my mother had been born and lived--in Newport News--till she left to go to college. (She had one later stint there a little while after she married my dad, which is where I was conceived and born--in Richmond.) I must have een 7 or 8 years old, and she decided to teach me the phrase in Latin and English--"thus always to tyrants." It's on the state seal, flag, everything. And she showed me the stance of the victor with his foot on the chest of the vanquished tyrant lying on the ground, and one arm raised in victory. And she had me imitate it and say the Latin phrase!

Wow--what a memory this unearths, after decades!


There's also sic transit gloria mundi. Which means "school's cancelled because the buses can't run"... er, no, wait... here it is... "thus passes worldly glory".
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