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I'm having a lot of brush, vines, removed from the yard. Not sure the exact variety of vine however some are full of thorns and many without thorns have crept up the trees in excess of 15 foot or so. They have been pulled down, and cut low to the ground as a first step. There are too many to dig each one up by hand. There are several large trees, oak & maple 25-40 feet tall (estimate well over the 2nd story of the house in height), and a smaller 10 foot high dogwood that I'd like to keep healthy.

Does anyone have a good way to kill the vines/brush/wees off without damaging the trees? This area will eventually be grass and perhaps some garden in the future but I assume I'll that will happen next year after the killing process takes place.
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Cut cut cut cut cut....then paint/brush the stubble with Brush killer...I think it’s an Ortho product. Don’t get spray on base of tree, that’s why brushing is recommending. I detest vines and I’ve been fighting them all my adult life taking care of my yard. Ivy, honeysuckle, grapevine, etc....all are hard to kill and if not pulled down will choke a tree or a bush.

And don’t ever plant bamboo, if you do, you will be paying for it for the rest of your life. :)

Dog
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Does anyone have a good way to kill the vines/brush/wees off without damaging the trees?

Just cut the vines at ground level as they start to re-sprout. Eventually they will run out of stored carbohydrates.

DB2
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And don’t ever plant bamboo, if you do, you will be paying for it for the rest of your life.

Many years ago I lived in San Diego. My roommate had developed an intense dislike of our landlord. Shortly before our lease was up he went down to the San Diego River and dug up some bamboo growing wild. He then planted it in the corner of the yard....

DB2
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And don’t ever plant bamboo, if you do, you will be paying for it for the rest of your life. :)

Funny you brought that up, my SO wants bamboo, I've heard it's problematic to say the least.
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Hi canonian,

I use a 20% Remedy/diesel mix for brush.

If I cut an area, I spray the stumps to prevent regrowth. I come back a year or two later to grub the stumps or I chainsaw them flush to the ground.

I do a basal spray (nozzle set to stream, not spray) of the bottom 12 to 18 inches of stems that are 1 1/2 inch or smaller. Works well on various vines, cat claw, mesquite, blue thorn, black thorn, all cacti, blue-berry juniper, salt cedar, etc.

If it is within 50 feet of a live oak or other tree/shrub like china berry, mulberry, yaupon, etc that I want to keep, I will use a plastic foam brush to paint each stem.

I used my hands to "dig" around a few that were tight against a large oak. After I went as deep as I could with my gloved fingers, I nipped it off as deep in the hole as I could with a lopper and then pushed a knife straight down into the stem to split it. I placed a survey flag on those. I pulled the flags 2 years later with no regrowth. But that was a "lot of work."

Short of carefully using a herbicide, manual cutting (and cutting) is the only method that will work.

Does that help you?

Gene
All holdings and some statistics on my Fool profile page
http://my.fool.com/profile/gdett2/info.aspx
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If you are careful about what kind of bamboo you get, it can be done. I have a patch of clumping bamboo in the corner of my yard and it hasn't changed size in the decades I've lived here. The neighbors have running bamboo and that's the kind you don't want.
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I've done all the 'methods' here and they work with some success.

I have really problematic thorny bushes (I liken them to wild roses, but they don't flower). Currently I cut off the stem leaving it about a foot in length. Then I force the stem into a small bottle (I have test tubes) containing straight brush killer. After a week or so, I can reuse the set-up on another bush. Yet to be determined is how effective this is against a multiple stemmed bush. I think it will kill the whole bush; we'll see.
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Funny you brought that up, my SO wants bamboo, I've heard it's problematic to say the least.

There are two types of bamboo, I.e., running and clumping. Here’s a American Bamboo Society website that provides answers to any question.
https://bamboo.org/GeneralInfoPages/RunnersAndClumpers.html
For example: Controlling bamboo.
Barriers:
To prevent a running bamboo from spreading, a “rhizome barrier” is essential. A barrier two or three feet deep is effective. It should be slanted outward at the top so that when the rhizomes hit the barrier they will bend upwards. A barrier does not stop a running rhizome; it only deflects it. The barrier should project an inch or two above ground level. Check the barrier once a year, and cut off rhizomes that arch over the top.
Barriers can be concrete, or metal, or plastic. The usual recommendation is high-density polypropylene, 40 mil or heavier, glued or taped at junctions, or clamped with stainless-steel clamps. This material comes in rolls, or as hinged sections, and is available from some landscape suppliers and bamboo nurseries, frequently termed root barrier. More elaborate barriers with corner posts that hold the material at the proper angle are also available.

————————————————

Last year, I noticed new bamboo growth on my neighbor’s side appearing above our common 6-foot high slump concrete block wall and new shoots appearing on my side. She had transplanted an overgrown potted bamboo plant gift next to her wall unaware that it was a runner with roots and growth spreading along the wall and under the block wall footing to my side. ?When notified (we are good friends), she immediately had her yard maintenance service dig out and remove all bamboo growth and roots which to date has not reappeared.

Bottom-line: before buying and planting, do your research on bamboo varieties. Some clumping bamboos like the ones at Disneyland’s Jungle Cruise attraction were planted purposefully for their very tall heights and visual effects that most likely would not be suitable for the typical residential yard.
=============================

canonian, regarding your problematic vines and brush, before any treatment, I would specifically identify these plants and then seek and find appropriate remedies. Consult with local nurseries for identification and treatment, or if the problem covers a large area, consult with a horticulturist. It appears that gdett2 did his own due diligence and implemented what works best.

canonian, I do not know where you live, but in Hawaii where I grew up, exotic invasive vines and brush have caused highly destructive problems. Here’s a listing of Hawaii's Most Invasive Horticultural Plants.
http://www.hear.org/hortweeds/
As an example:
IVY GOURD (COCCINIA GRANDIS)
https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/hisc/info/invasive-species-profiles/...
Description
This aggressive perennial vine of the cucumber family has star shaped flowers with 5 petals and smooth bright red fruit that are 1-3” long. The leaves are alternate and variably shaped (sometimes deeply lobed.) Stem and leaves of the vine are mostly smooth (without hair).
Impacts
Vines grow over and smother vegetation, cover fences and power lines. It threatens natural and managed areas. It is extremely difficult to control because plants regrow from deep roots, even after treating with herbicide. Although ivy gourd requires cross-pollination between male and ,female plants, it is able to spread quickly and can grow up to four inches per day.

Each island has an Invasive Species Committee. For example, the O’ahu Invasive Species Committee, regarding one problematic vine, Cape or German ivy (Delairea odorata) on O’ahu, advises:
https://www.oahuisc.org/cape-ivy/
Do NOT pull or cut down the plant.  OISC will properly remove and dispose of the plant to prevent spreading seeds and re-sprouting.
——————————

I’ll end with Kudzu; the vine that ate the South.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kudzu_in_the_United_States

Regards,
Ray
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'Cut and paint' works, but the more stem/trunk surface area to paint the better. So large diameter stems or trunks of 5" or more are good. Cut near ground level and paint several times a few minutes apart, again the more treatment the better. It soaks in quickly, reapply. Any brush-killing type herbicide should work, including RoundUp. I'm currently involved with a 4-acre forest restoration project, with 100-year old wisteria choking everything in site. 4 years in, it's starting to take shape. As the wisteria and other vines have retreated, 350 trees have been planted so far. If you post a picture of vine(s), I can tell you what they are if you live in the eastern half of US. I'm a professional horticulturist, retired.

And yes, never plant running bamboo. Clumping types are ok, but they are much more winter tender than running types. Fargesia is the most common genus of clumping bamboo...there aren't many. There are many genera of running types.

conifer
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Does anyone have a good way to kill the vines/brush/wees off without damaging the trees? This area will eventually be grass and perhaps some garden in the future but I assume I'll that will happen next year after the killing process takes place.

For the vines, cut them off 5 or 4-inches above ground level and paint them with Triclopyr. It can be found in products like Bonide Vine & Stump Killer (See https://www.amazon.com/Bonide-Stump-Killer-Applicator-Concen... ) and other products. I get mine in a commercial product by the gallon (see https://www.domyown.com/alligare-triclopyr-p-20562.html?mscl... ) which is like 61% active and, when diluted as per label directions, will kill most weeds, trees, etc. as it is used by the highway dept., utility companies, etc. to clear the right of way. It works well on old poison ivy vines.
;-)

C.J.V. - had the mother of all poison ivy vines in one of my trees i hada kill, me
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Thanks for all the replies.

It is going well.

Machete round got rid of all the tree climbers and work around trees.
Round 2 with the new weed whacker and a blade attachment made quick work of low stuff and thicker vines, small trees, shrubs that needs to go.
Round 3 was removing one medium sized bush stump, taking down one 6"-8" tree that was leaning toward the house severely, had to do it the good old fashioned way with a splitting maul since the chainsaw had not been run in year. Good exercise! :)
Everything hauled away for the most part.
Saving the tree for fire woood once I get the chainsaw going.
Sprayed/painted my first round of vine killer and waiting. Lots of brown and some green mixed in that I'll get on weed whacking round 2.
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As a side note, I pulled out several yucca plants about 8 years ago when I redid the front of the house. Never saw them again.....Last week I found a Yucca sprouting up under a rose bush. Unreal.

R4M
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Yucca’s are extremely hard to get rid of, I dig, I spray and they still come back....if they are growing in otherwise hard to grow areas, I leave them, when they bloom, the flower is quite gorgeous.

Lucky Dog
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My nickname for bamboo is damboo!

In the mid-1960s, my parents’ neighbor brought back a few bamboo shoots from Japan to plant along the small creek behind his home. Bamboo knows no bounds. Fast forward 50 years and that bamboo had taken over my parents’ entire backyard and invaded multiple other neighbors’ yards too.

If any public company ever develops a chemical that kills bamboo, I am buying that stock! Forget using a shovel too. The ONLY way to get rid of it is to dig it up - with a backhoe.

So unless you despise your neighbors and enjoy setting cash on fire having to pay a backhoe operator to dig up your yard, never, ever plant bamboo anywhere other than a container which has zero contact with the ground.
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Note: there are many different types of Bamboo. Some are clumping and others are considered "runners". Some runners have no bounds, as your parents have discovered. I luv the plants, however, there are some things I'll not even bring onto our "acre". This is one that Mrs PL and I concur on...

ww.consideredclumping.pl/chosenotto/
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Partly depends on where you live, obvi. I have, in southern NH, two kinds of vines: the wild "raspberries" (which I insist is about their effect on your skin, not fruit) covered in nasty mid-length thorns, and regular choking woody vines ("grapevines" with no grapes?) that wrap themselves around trunks, branches, anything they can find.

After 20 years of battle, the only effective treatment I've found is pull them out by hand by the roots.

The thorny vines can grow out of the moisture between layers of oak leaves. But once they are gone from an area they have not come back. I cleaned out a nice birch glade in between me and a neighbor and mulched. It took 2 years, but they haven't come back in the 17 years since.

The grapey-vines do keep coming back and spread to weird places. But, you can just cut them with loppers a couple of feet off the ground and then unwind them from the low tree branches or trunks a week or two later, and rip them out of the ground with a twisting tool, shovel, or brute force. Good leg workout, light squats. ;-)

Then there's the poison ivy, which seems to reappear by magic, but that's another story.
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Then there's the poison ivy, 

I read an article recently that, due to climate change, vines (especially poison ivy) are increasingly difficult to eradicate and poison ivy is producing more of the oil.

AC *great*
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