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I've always done crochet but now I want to knit and I'm finding that it's a very different animal and I keep getting confused so if you could only have one book on learning to knit, what book would it be?

Thanks,
Kathy
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Greetings!
This isn't quite what you wanted, but I recently retaught myself to knit using these two websites:

http://www.lionbrand.com/
(click on the "Learn to Knit" icon)
and
http://www.learntoknit.com/home.php3

Having two sets of instructions to compare helped. Have Fun!

Sandy

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My daughter and I both taught ourselves from a book called "Kids Knitting," here's a link to the amazon description: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1579652417/qid=1097353033/sr=8-1/ref=pd_ka_1/103-0238633-4311848?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

Although the focus is (obviously) projects for kids, it has excellent illustrations of the basic stitches -- plus it's a very pretty book...
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Vogue Knitting: http://tinyurl.com/3tz88

It's the bible.

- Pam
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I have to second Vogue Knitting. It answers practically every question you may have (and many that you may not have!) I've also heard that "Knitting Without Tears" by Elizabeth Zimmerman is good too -- I haven't read it, but I've learned a few neat tricks from others who have.

CK
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"Knitting Without Tears" by Elizabeth Zimmerman ROCKS! And it's written entirely in English, rather than Knitting Code.
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Thanks for all the book and website choices, I will check them all out tonight!

Kathy
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ok so I got the kiddie knitting book and I still can't figure it out...I'm pathetic...lol. So I just ordered the knitting without tears since I'm just about there but does anyone know if there's a good video of knitting? Something I can see and rewind till the tape melts?

Kathy
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I learned how to crochet out of a book, but I have never been able to learn knitting out of a book. When my DD needed to learn to knit for Girl Scouts, we took a class together at the local Michael's. It was $10 for the 2 hour class, and that was enough to learn basic stitches. If you're having difficulty learning from a book, perhaps one or two knitting classes where someone can show you might help you to at least pick up the basics. Then from there, you could most likely pick up the rest from the book once you know what you're trying to do and what to look for.
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does anyone know if there's a good video of knitting? Something I can see and rewind till the tape melts?

In the FAQ there's this link:

http://www.stitchguide.com/

but I'll tell you the truth, the best way to learn is to watch someone. I had a fifteen minute lesson at a yarn shop, and I've been on my own ever since.

Did you find Stitch 'N' B!tch? That has some very good illustrations. But, really, if you can find a good yarn shop, or someone who knits (I've found three people by listening in the company dining room, and could probably find others by hanging around the local yarn store and watching as someone else is coached) that would be the best thing, because no matter how good the pictures are, watching to see how someone holds her hands is the best way to learn.

It seems to me, looking back over many years, that I must have started out by making a V-neck sweater in a very boring shade of brown. I must have been nuts.

Or else my mother was, since it was she who started me on that project.

Nancy
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Nope; I don't know of any. But I did look at the two website instructions. It's probably easy to follow if you already know how to knit, but it does go from point A to point B in steps, and knitting isn't exactly steps. It's more fluid than that. My mom taught me the basics, or maybe my friends in high school did, or both. After you learn the basics, with a little help, you can figure out most things with written instructions and pictures. (And I checked your profile. You can read. ;o)

But written instructions are accompanied by pictures, always showing a woman's hand , and the working end of the yarn is always draped perfectly over her index finger. Mine never is. In fact, I think I keep the yarn running along the right needle, clenched in my sweaty little fist.

It helps if you give yourself permission to do really awful knitting. Tell yourself "I'm going to knit a little square badly. I promise to eff the next one up to a fair-thee-well. The square after that will suck the moon right out of the sky! And the one after that will be pitiful indeed." Get some big honkin' a** needles, and some fat fat fatty fat yarn or even clothesline, and make pot holders. Coasters. Dog and cat mats. Mouse mats, doormats (actually, you can make doormats with rope and big a** needles), ferret mats. Fishing nets. The good thing about fat yarn and big needles is you can see what you're doing, and compare notes with the available pictures. Then you can get down to the stuff that's floating around in your mind. Heck, just start with one stitch. If you figure out one knit stitch, then just make more all in a row.

You can do it, Crestline Kathy! Just eff it up royally and makes lots of asymmetrical, lumpy little squares. After you make enough of them, and sooner than you think, you'll be knitting with competence and flair.

greet.
thinking about cat mats for the Porch Kitties...


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<<I had a fifteen minute lesson at a yarn shop, and I've been on my own ever since.
>>

I sat for 2 hours one on one with a woman who's been knitting for 40 years and can't remember a thing she showed me. Crochet is a since but knitting? My mind just can't grasp it. I've already made 2 scarfs today via crochet, I wanted to make a knitted one though.

I work 7 days a week so classes will be tough to do but I'll keep trying.

Kathy
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I work 7 days a week so classes will be tough to do but I'll keep trying.

If you can find a co-worker who knits then you could ask for some demonstrations. I've found a couple people who knit who I can ask for help. Is there a place where you could post a question?

People in yarn shops are often willing to demonstrate a stitch once you have the fundamentals down.

Nancy
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Greetings!
I did a little web searching and found http://www.fiberartshop.com/knclbg.htme (the video's seem a little fuzzy - but the actions are fairly clear)

http://www.stitchguide.com/stitches/knitting/stitch_pages/kn_knit.html (this one is better focused, but no voice over)

Hope these help

Sandy
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I sat for 2 hours one on one with a woman who's been knitting for 40 years and can't remember a thing she showed me.

2 hours would be about an hour and fifty minutes too long for me. I took a mini-basket weaving class once (I mean mini-baskets, made from waxed linen.), and the teacher was so facile, so fast, so talented that it was brain-numbing to watch her. Worse, in the midst of my frustration, she stood behind me where I sat, and actually guided my hands, the thread, and the pokey tool to show me how to do it. I could feel my initial frustration reach the point of overwhelmed tears. I didn't cry, but I was right there at the brink. At that point, all is lost. I asked her to stop, but she wanted to keep showing me how to do it. So I repeated myself and she backed off. I think she was frustrated too, because she was being paid to teach this little class, and really wanted to share her skills and knowledge. And itty-bitty basket kits for a hefty sum, too...

Small bites. A little bite, a little learning, repeat, repeat. At your own pace. Keep the frustrattion pot from boiling over. A little simmer is good. Can you do one knitting stitch? If you can do that, then what happens? Is it a memory thing or an awkwardness thing? Or something else?

greet.
Just itching to be helpful. Or a PITA, whichever comes first.
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I learned from a friend, who learned from a friend. I think it's the best way - particularly now when I scan through "Stitch and Bitch" and still get confused by some of the drawings.
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I agree. I think THE single best way is to learn from someone else. My Mom had to show me how to knit and purl because I couldn't figure it out from a book. To this day, I still get confused by book diagrams on the basics (the other stuff, I'm OK with). Besides, learning from someone else is more fun!

CK
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I agree. I think THE single best way is to learn from someone else.

Unless you're a righty learning from a lefty! :-) My friend Sarah tried and tried and we just couldn't do it. I finally found a website with diagrams I could understand.

Kaiti
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I've learned everything from the Stich and Bitc* book so far...and was completely new to knitting before...

And let me tell you...I'm a bit impatient with these things...and well sort of ummm...like to get everything crafty right the first time ;-)

but I really had to take my time, and stare and stare at the diagrams...putting my want-to-do-it-all-right-out-of-the-gateness on the shelf (it's hard!!...but I guess it's doable).
And, I find that it's nice having the book there for reference too, cause if you are learning and go away from a piece in the beginning for a little while, it's great to have that reference diagram...I've had to look at the book for binding off a few times at the end of my simple starter pieces cause I forget...it's like a good security blanket (wow, this is feeling like a 'beginnner knitter confession'of sorts ;-) )...

I think it's just one of those things, just consider your learning style in gerenal and how you tend to grasp new things...easier when ppl show you? do you like to read instructions or learn a few things from someone and then take off on your own??

For me, a lot of times I learn better from ppl and visuals/experimentation...I thought about taking a class but wanted to save $$ (and I don't know anyone locally who knits)..so I figured I'd consolidate and try to learn the beginner stuff out of the book(s) and slightly more complex stuff in a class or pay for a lesson when I am really stuck.

SnB is a good book but there are others that I've seen in craft sections too that have similar getting started diagrams...(SnB just provides a little humor as well!)...also online too...searching on key words like 'knit and purl' will get you a lot of diagrams for freeeeee!

But I've found of all things one needs a bit of patience and time...
And so, from one beginner knitter to another I give you the words of George Harrison :)

It's gonna take time
A whole lot of precious time
It's gonna take patience and time, ummm
To do it, to do it, to do it, to do it, to do it,
To do it right


Cheers,
E
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