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I have Janus Worldwide and Fidelity Equity Growth in my 401(k) and i was thinking of going to some less aggressive funds that are offered in the plan like BlackRock Index Equity (-9.40%YTD,11.66%past 3yrs and 17.62% past five yrs) nice three and five years return or the BlackRock Mid Cap Growth(-11.38%YTD,33.56%3yrs 5yrs N/A) or the BlackRock Mid Cap Value(13.66%YTD,4.06%3yrs,5yrs N/A)or BlackRock Large Cap Value(9.57%YTD,7.68%3yrs,14.68%5yrs) I do have about 20-25 years till i retire i figured i can be a little less aggressive. Just looking for a little input in to the ideal of mime. I thank all who reply.

mhorem
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I have Janus Worldwide and Fidelity Equity Growth in my 401(k)


So do I! I am thinking about splitting mine into 5-7 funds; but first I'm hoping to recoop some losses.
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I am thinking about splitting mine into 5-7 funds; but first I'm hoping to recoop some losses.

This is not the proper way to think about an investment. "I will get out as soon as I have recovered my losses" tells me that you don't understand what you're doing.

Why is it so important that you stay in your current fund until the balance reaches "X"? Is it because you think your current fund is likely to do that quicker than any alternative you can think of? And if/when that does happen, what would you switch to? Something that's "better"? If the alternative is so great, why don't you switch now? If your current funds do charge ahead and "recover" your losses, as surely as you're reading this post your attitude will change. "Well, it's doing so well I guess I'll stay with it," you'll say.

Pick a fund; understand what it owns; understand the manager's outlook, and forget about it. Revisit your assumptions every couple of years, or if the manager and/or his approach changes.
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This is not the proper way to think about an investment. "I will get out as soon as I have recovered my losses" tells me that you don't understand what you're doing.

Actually, YOU don't understand what I am doing.

Penny
who has moved her retirement date up by 15 years, and wishes to recoop losses and then "maintain"

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> This is not the proper way to think about an investment. "I will get out as soon as I have recovered my losses"
> tells me that you don't understand what you're doing.

Actually, YOU don't understand what I am doing.

Penny
who has moved her retirement date up by 15 years, and wishes to recoop losses and then "maintain"


My apologies; I should not have assumed anything about your sophistication as an investor. I was out of line.

However, "I will sell as soon as my investment gets back up to $X" is something we hear all too often. The question is not too much different from "My investment has dropped by 30%. Should I get out?". Most of the time, you can tell that folks are investing without really understanding what might happen.

I am especially sensitive to the "I'll sell when it goes back up" line of thinking, as this cost my father over 1/3 of his retirement assets last year, in his first year of retirement. Rather than properly diversify his assets into funds that were more in line with his (new) risk tolerance, he rode a Janus fund down to the bottom, refusing to get outuntil the very bottom. So now he's properly positioned, but with
1/3 less capital. Please don't let this happen to you.
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Some very sound advice, thank you.

Mhorem
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