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Learning for fun is a leisure activity I currently enjoy and look forward to spending more time whenever I retire again.

Here are some ideas on making this an inexpensive activity:

- NPR (I do to donate to their pledge drives )
- Download online courses to my IPOD from Apple University
- MIT has put some free courses online
- Google books search
- The Osher Institutes which are affliated with local colleges and universities, offer low-cost non-credit courses for people over 50. Below link is an example--courses cost $15

http://lifelonglearning.asu.edu/


Anyone else have ideas?
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I know people who enjoy Elder Hostel. Lots of courses in exotic places with low fees. This combines travel and education.

If you like history don't forget your local library.

And on Google, not just books but used books are very attractive. Many can be purchased for little more than shipping costs, often $3.99.

For readers, BookShare is a great organization to know about.

http://www.bookshare.org/

This a voluneer organization for the blind and seeing impaired. Clients can download books from BookShare and them have their computers read them the book or display it on a Braille reader device. Volunteers scan the books in and then proofread them to correct scanning errors. In the proofing process you get a copy of the book for your computer and can read it at your leisure.
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No. of Recommendations: 5
Here are some ideas on making this an inexpensive activity:

- NPR (I do to donate to their pledge drives )
- Download online courses to my IPOD from Apple University
- MIT has put some free courses online
- Google books search
- The Osher Institutes which are affliated with local colleges and universities, offer low-cost non-credit courses for people over 50. Below link is an example--courses cost $15

http://lifelonglearning.asu.edu/


Anyone else have ideas?


iTunesU is great!!

Most major colleges have free online courses. Oxford, Cambridge, and Stanford are a few that have online courses for free.

Carnegie Mellon also has free online course. They have one of the top rated online robotics courses in the world.


Annenberg Media has a free sites that has online courses in everything from languages to American Literature to Migratory Effects:
http://www.learner.org/

The BBC has free language courses online:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/

The Extension service runs the Master Gardener Program:
http://www.ahs.org/master_gardeners/

I highly recommend this man's projects:
http://johnnylee.net/projects/wii/

Many associations will offer free education in exchange for work.

If you want a volunteer assignment that will teach you a boatload, and you'll have fun doing, try this:
http://webdev.usfirst.org/Default.aspx

I'll post more links later,
Kathleen
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If your local library dosn't have enough for you, but you live near a better library system, you can likely join the other library system for a small charge. In my area the libraries are by county and my wife uses the audible books extensively so she pays about $25 per year to join the library in the adjacent county to get access to the different audible books that they have. You may also be able to use a local college library by paying a fee to join it.

If you do end up paying tuition, don’t forget about the “lifetime learning credit” that will credit back 20% of qualified tuition expenses(and books?) up to a $2,000 credit per year. I’m not a 100% sure but some educational trips through colleges may at least partially qualify for this.

In some states senior citizens can attend college courses at the state colleges and universities that have open seats for free or at a greatly reduced cost.

Greg
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Late to the conversation as usual but, I found this engaging:

http://academicearth.org/

Cheers,
ricebowlsoupe
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In our area, many of the local colleges offer tuition free courses for seniors. George Fox University in Newberg, Oregon is just one. Here is a link....

http://www.georgefox.edu/about/quick_facts/community_contrib...

I plan on getting an additional degree so that I can supplement my income with part-time work.....
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I'm interested in low-cost retirement activities also. In fact, I'd like to hear some more examples.

For me, the first ones that come to mind are: reading, learning a foreign language, learning a musical instrument, hiking & walking (& maybe camping), birding, exercising, taking day trips to explore the local area -- but what else are good low-cost retirement activities?

culcha
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but what else are good low-cost retirement activities?

Volunteering
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Hiking Civil War and Revolutionary War battlefields - State and
National parks.
Generally there are volunteers needed at the locations as well.
City parks - county parks.

College and minor league sports teams generally are low-cost.
Driving through the country - can be relatively low-cost - picnics.

Birdwatching.
Of various types.

Howie52
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Here are more ideas for leisure activities

Sell your stuff on eBay. (I'm now a Power Seller and I still have stuff to sell!)

Learn a new craft. You can learn anything on the internet, and on YouTube. Pottery making, scrap booking, rug hooking, candle making, sewing, quilting, calligraphy, glass working, and more

Build your own website or blog and write about your passions. (I have one about retirement and another about party planning)

Take up extreme couponing. I tried it, but it took up so much of my time I stopped, but on my first shopping trip after getting started I got $260 of groceries for $120. You can print coupons from online sites if you don't get a newspaper paper with coupons.

Document your family's history. Start with a family tree with information about your close family and research back from there. Tons of information online, and many towns have Historical Societies that can help you. Some public libraries have a history room that is a gold mine for genealogists.

Start a book club, sewing circle, quilting club...

Join a zumba class for exercise.

Start a family chain letter. Make a list of people and write a story about a memorable event, or what you're doing, send it to everyone and tag the next person. Ask everyone to add a name along with their letter. If you can do it via email, it will be free.

Organize your photos. Digitize your print photos and print your digital photos. Make new albums, like special editions on individuals or family events. Share photos with others in your family who may never have seen your photos of them.

I hope these are useful!

Fool on!
Cathy
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Darn, I forgot about Project Gutenberg (gutenberg dot org) where you can get free ebooks (epub, kindle, audio, etc).

You can also volunteer to help with the project.
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