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<<“Ms. Phipps and her husband agreed that an art school would be the best fit for Isabella, who wants a career in animation. Specialized schools can be expensive, even when they’re public: The cost of attendance at the school where she’s now a freshman, the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, was about $55,400 for out-of-state students.”>>



Another family breaking themselves on the wheel of college loans.

Just sign HERE.

I suppose both the child and the parents will be debted up to the eyeballs as a result.


Seattle Pioneer
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FWIW, if she's planning on med school then it almost doesn't make a difference where she does pre-med. The important thing is grad (medical) school. So she could attend a state university for much less, excel there, and apply for the grad school she wants. They really look at your last degree, not your first (e.g. I have a master's at UofA; no one cares where I got my bachelors). Heck, she could attend community college for the first two years (take care of English, social studies, etc), and then transfer to a state school to finish her bachelors. Saves a LOT of money.

1poorguy
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true. My SIL attended a good but not excellent college, where did super well, got a PhD at MIT and is now a tenured scientist at a top research university/med school.
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FWIW, if she's planning on med school then it almost doesn't make a difference where she does pre-med.

Thanks. Yes, this one is a state school. $25k/year seems to be about the going rate. She's doing AP classes in high school, which will take care of some of those basic college classes.

Right now she wants to be a psychiatrist, probably specializing in pediatric psychiatry. A worthy ambition, with a long way to go.
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She's doing AP classes in high school, which will take care of some of those basic college classes.

If you're lucky, the university/college will accept a lot of the credits. My daughter's university accepted 40 out of her 44 that she earned in high school.

PSU
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That's one expensive state school. Arizona (in-state) is about $4500/sem ($9K per year). Maybe consider relocating and establishing residency (usually 1 year)?? Your schools are per-sem more expensive than an entire year here.

And I thought we were bad. (I never paid more than $700/sem in-state in Arizona when I was in school.)
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1pg: Arizona (in-state) is about $4500/sem ($9K per year).

When I went to Texas Tech, tuition was $25 a semester. Books were much more modestly priced than now. The big expense was room & board. IIRC, something like $200 a month in a dorm. Loooong time ago

The discussion prompted me to look up the current situation. Tuition is now $6,432 a year, $3216 a semester.

https://www.collegesimply.com/colleges/texas/texas-tech-univ...

Current estimate is $23,633 a semester total.

CNC
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1poorguy writes,

That's one expensive state school. Arizona (in-state) is about $4500/sem ($9K per year). Maybe consider relocating and establishing residency (usually 1 year)?? Your schools are per-sem more expensive than an entire year here.

</snip>


Maybe AdrianC is including room & board in the $30k. Some of those dorms at state schools look like resorts now.

https://offcampushousing.lsu.edu/

I lived in an apartment complex not far from LSU when I worked in Baton Rouge. Even saw Shaquille O'Neill out by the pool a couple of times.

intercst
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If you're lucky, the university/college will accept a lot of the credits. My daughter's university accepted 40 out of her 44 that she earned in high school.

That's great. Our daughter should have 9 or 10 AP classes done by the time she graduates high school.
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That's one expensive state school.

Intercst was right, I was including room & board in the $30k. It's hardly a resort, though. The usual 2 kids to a small room with a shared bathroom down the hall.

This school is a "Public Ivy". Their base tuition is $16K, but our kid will get a guaranteed $5K academic scholarship on her current ACT score and GPA. She's only taken the ACT one time, she can definitely get that score up (they super-score - take the best score on each section - and she aced the English already). By upping the ACT 2 points she will get $8K off, which brings it into line with other Ohio state schools.

The University of Alabama said she could go there tuition free...I don't think so.

And I thought we were bad. (I never paid more than $700/sem in-state in Arizona when I was in school.)

I, erm, didn't pay a penny for mine...even got a grant for living expenses. You'd think competition would have been intense. It wasn't. Different times.
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You went to school in a nation that doesn't punish kids for wanting to go to school, yes? A sensible nation (well, except recently with that Brexit nonsense).

We seem to want to keep kids down unless they are from rich families or can play ball.
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<<That's great. Our daughter should have 9 or 10 AP classes done by the time she graduates high school.>>


Sounds like a criteria for selecting a college would be accepting those AP credits.



Seattle Pioneer
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things are a lot different these days

Back 50 years ago, it was hard to take more than 1 or 2 AP courses at most high schools.

I managed to get out of one semester of Chem Lab.....

Passed the German AP test, but my college only required language for physics majors.....two years...my roommate took 2 years of Russian.....

And Calc.....all you could do is get out of one semester of Calc.

that was it...no other opportunities despite 'advanced college track' program for the top 20% of the class......back then....

Wow - 9 or 10 AP courses. That either says colleges are a lot dumber than before....or some high schools are exceptional. Or some high school programs are so dumb for most that anything that was 'normal' and 'routine' before is now AP material?

We were kept busy with regular course work......for high school. First year of college was fairly easy - we had a lot of the physics and chem in high school already! But college went deeper into it quickly. Used the slide rule a lot. And logarithms too. Second year was a bear with entirely new stuff in every subject.....including Fortran IV programming on the new IBM 360 solid state computer - using punch cards for access....... (no PCs back then!)......


t.
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You went to school in a nation that doesn't punish kids for wanting to go to school, yes?

That was then. Doesn't seem much different to here, now.

Current tuition at my old school:
International students: £14,500/year
EU students: £9,250/year

Back in the 1980's the UK government tried to encourage higher education, especially STEM. We were effectively paid to attend a university or polytechnic. Anyone who could qualify academically, and stick with it, got 4 years of college. But qualifying academically meant staying on an extra two years at high school. A lot of families couldn't afford that, or saw no value in it. Most of my peers left high school at age 16 and went into (low) paid "job training" schemes of one sort or another.
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Wow - 9 or 10 AP courses. That either says colleges are a lot dumber than before....or some high schools are exceptional. Or some high school programs are so dumb for most that anything that was 'normal' and 'routine' before is now AP material?

Some high schools are exceptional. Around here, you won't find that many AP classes in smaller schools. My daughter's HS has 2500 students. There are also a number of honors classes that are between regular and AP classes. Just passing the AP class isn't good enough to get credit in college. You also have to pass the AP test.

PSU
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Some high schools are exceptional. Around here, you won't find that many AP classes in smaller schools. My daughter's HS has 2500 students.

Same here: >800 students in my kids' class. The big schools can provide a range of options within subjects. My daughter has been in a "gifted" program or advanced classes since 5th grade (she gets her academic smarts from her mother, obviously). This is not a rich school district. 50% of the kids at our elementary qualify for free or reduced cost lunches.
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Good luck with that ACT score!

I was trying to get a full scholarship for college, and I had everything except the ACT score. I ended up taking the test 4x! My score went up every time, and on the 4th time, it was finally high enough. However, by the time I got the results, the deadline to apply for the scholarship had already passed.

I went to my guidance counselor, and I told him about it. He called the college, and he asked if they picked the recipients yet. They told him that they were doing it on Saturday. It was Thursday at the time. I gathered all of my documents, wrote an essay, and asked the principal and a teacher to write me letters of recommendation. We faxed the documents to the college on Friday. On Saturday, they called and offered me the scholarship. Good deal!


TMFEdyboom223
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Good luck with that ACT score!

Thanks. Glad it all worked out for you, and congrats on the scholarship. My daughter is a junior so she should have plenty of time...but we know how that goes.

She already has a pretty great score, but higher = more scholarship money, and she's going to need it if she's going to do med school.

Friends of ours did the FAFSA and were told they can afford up to $60k/year towards their daughter's schooling. They can't, of course. Not if they ever want to retire. I expect we won't bother with FAFSA.
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It doesn't hurt (FAFSA). The "expected parent contribution" (or words to that effect), if it's less than tuition, could still garner junior some cash. Never know till you try.
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Our income was quite variable during our daughter's college years. Filled out the FAFSA for freshman year for a baseline, but she didn't qualify for any need-based aid that year. Filled it out one other year when income took a dip, and she did receive a little bit of need-based aid that year - a subsidized student loan. It wasn't worth filling out the other years.
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It doesn't hurt (FAFSA). The "expected parent contribution" (or words to that effect), if it's less than tuition, could still garner junior some cash. Never know till you try.

True.

So, a quick look:
https://thecollegefinanciallady.com/2019/09/03/efc-formula-g...

https://ifap.ed.gov/efcformulaguide/attachments/2021EFCFormu...

"The Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is a number that determines students’ eligibility for certain types of federal student aid."

Ignoring income,
Parents' Contribution from Assets (Taxable assets X 0.12)
+ Student's Contribution from Assets (Assets x 0.2) (money her grandfather gave her that she doesn't know about)
= Much more than she's going to spend on school in a year.

So unless I'm missing something we won't qualify for anything that way. Woe is us, right? :-)
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It doesn't hurt (FAFSA). The "expected parent contribution" (or words to that effect), if it's less than tuition, could still garner junior some cash. Never know till you try.

I didn't bother with either kid after my older daughter's freshman year. Waste of my time.

PSU
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I didn't bother either after the first time. We're salary, and it either remains stable or goes up every year. Plus our assets increase every year (I invest conservatively, no swinging for the fences, so it generally goes up year after year). Once we determined she wouldn't qualify, it was a foregone conclusion that wouldn't change thereafter. Adrian is talking about doing it the first time.
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Adrian is talking about doing it the first time.

Yep, and thanks for the suggestion. I'll spend some more time on it later, but at first glance it looks like a non-starter. Not a problem. We have an adequately funded 529, more than adequately funded with the market performance of late...must switch her to a more conservative asset allocation soon.
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Article about FAFSA

FAFSA Says How Much You Can Pay for College. It’s Often Wrong.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/15/your-money/fafsa-financia...

“Ms. Phipps and her husband agreed that an art school would be the best fit for Isabella, who wants a career in animation. Specialized schools can be expensive, even when they’re public: The cost of attendance at the school where she’s now a freshman, the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, was about $55,400 for out-of-state students.”

That’s a good part of the problem. Lower middle class families thinking they should finance college that expensive. Nuts.
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<<“Ms. Phipps and her husband agreed that an art school would be the best fit for Isabella, who wants a career in animation. Specialized schools can be expensive, even when they’re public: The cost of attendance at the school where she’s now a freshman, the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, was about $55,400 for out-of-state students.”>>



Another family breaking themselves on the wheel of college loans.

Just sign HERE.

I suppose both the child and the parents will be debted up to the eyeballs as a result.


Seattle Pioneer
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When my boys were young, I told them that mom and dad don't have much money. So, I told them they had to do their best in all they did to include academics, athletics, music, theater, ethically and morally and so on.

My oldest son did great. We worried that our youngest wouldn't do as well as the older one. However, he basically has done better than his brother in almost every category.

Both boys attended the US Coast Guard Academy. They are both Officers in the US Coast Guard now.

They are both in their 20's. They both have stock portfolios. And, the oldest, now 26, recently bought his first rental house.

College was free for both, all of their expenses were paid and they received a stipend during those 4 years.

Now, both get paid quite well and both have traveled the world.

Fool on,

mazske
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