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Bad timing for him www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11257875/
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It's just sad, to get all the way to the Olympics and then something that should've been dealt with months ago comes back to bite you in the butt. They should've done something about this sooner, the Olympics are pretty much the pinnacle for a lot of athletes.

The guy was publicily warned and all because the World Anti-Doping Agency decided that wasn't enough for them was he banned.

I also find it strange that he'd been taking the medication and that he only tested positive for it once. I don't know if they test everyone or just winners or if it's random, but the whole thing seems kinda fishy. I mean he'd been taking the medication for about 6 years and it was just added to the list of no-no's last year and of all the times he was drug tested it showed up once? Weird.

=) Megan
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They should've done something about this sooner, the Olympics are pretty much the pinnacle for a lot of athletes.

No matter when they did it, he would be out for this Olympics. Also, given than this was a CAS ruling, I would be willing to bet that rulings had been made some time ago (maybe not released, but made) and this was just final arbitration to afirm them.


I mean he'd been taking the medication for about 6 years and it was just added to the list of no-no's last year and of all the times he was drug tested it showed up once?

He admits to taking it, so there is nothing fishy about him testing positive. The test probably is not as advanced as a lot of others...so it gives a lot of false negatives. (Certainly better if it gives false negatives than false positives.) That and/or it was added to the banned list at the beginning of the year, but they did not start testing for it until late in the year...nothing fishy about that; it happens all the time as they realize something is a masking agent, but they don't know how to test it yet.

I think CAS handled this correctly. They stated that they do not believe he is a cheat, but he made a mistake. The rules are pretty clear and he has to pay the price for his mistake. I agree this is sad, but that does not mean anything was done improperly...

Acme
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I think CAS handled this correctly. They stated that they do not believe he is a cheat, but he made a mistake. The rules are pretty clear and he has to pay the price for his mistake. I agree this is sad, but that does not mean anything was done improperly...

I disagree. The amount of the chemical used in Propecia is insufficient to mask any drugs, which is what the test is intended to uncover. The theory is that if you are taking a drug that can mask a performance-enhancing drug, then you are just as guilty as if you were taking the performance enhancing drug even if not actually taking it.

This is a standard of indirect guilt that should offensive to a society that values innocence until guilt is proven. it is like saying that if you wear a baggy shirt you must be packing a gun, even if you can't see the gun. I am all for testing for doping offenders and banning them from all sports. But let's get the people who are actually committing the crimes, instead of punishing athletes who are trying to fight off premature balding.

Fuskie
Who notes this is the type of testing Bode Miller (what an a$$ for clubbing it up the night before his first race and then trying out new skis in competition) was speaking out against...
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(what an a$$ for clubbing it up the night before his first race and then trying out new skis in competition)
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He wouldn't be Bode then...

:-)Charlie
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