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Many shutters today are composed of two parts, upper and lower.

I think you are described how the typical analog SLR camera worked before digital cameras. The shutter moved from left to right (or right to left). The first part moved left to right opening the shutter, then when fully opened waited and then second part moved left to right to close. If the shutter speed was about 1/60th of a second the entire frame was being exposed at once. For shorter times (1/125, 1/250, etc) the closing side started closing before the opening side arrived, thus an open slit moved across the film. So even a 1/1000th shot took 1/60th of a second to complete.

In digital cameras you can have a rolling shutter or global shutter. Rolling shutter works the same way as analog SLRs. The pixels are scanned from left to right, top to bottom (or some other rotated pattern like this) The exposure time is how long each pixel counts photons, but the overall scanning time can be much longer.
In a global shutter camera all pixels count their accumulated photons starting at the same time and end at the same time. These are more expensive.

Mike
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"Thoughts?"

It's a terrific effect, if it can be duplicated when wanted.

OR it's a demon bird heralding the coming apocalypse?

Ken
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Many shutters today are composed of two parts, upper and lower. The very high shutter speeds like 1/8000 sec aren't due to a single shutter crossing the entire sensor in 1/8000 sec, but the combination of the upper and lower shutter crossing such that each part of the sensor is exposed for 1/8000 sec.

During that time it took for the shutter to move from one end of the sensor to the other the bird's wings moved into a different position. The blurred wings and background let us know a lower shutter speed was used, my guess is under 1/125 sec.

This also gives us an idea of how fast the bird's wings are flapping, with enlarging the background shows a little motion blur, but the wings are fairly clear.
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Very nice, so many of us, well at least me, take so much for grated, it's great folks like you do delve deeper into things like this.. Thank you! And my son thanks you!
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I first saw the photo from SmarterEveryDay's twitter feed within the last month but can't find it on the feed now. I think he took the shot - at least it seemed that way. SED did a video on rolling shutter, the affect of a camera sensor (mirrorless cameras only) on the image of fast moving objects. He did a video that explains it too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNVtMmLlnoE

To get the affect in the photo the camera must have been held sideways as rolling shutter goes from top to bottom, not side to side.

AFAIK.

Simon
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Excellent video & information... As I said earlier, there is so much we take for granted...

Thank you!
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Many shutters today are composed of two parts, upper and lower.

I think you are described how the typical analog SLR camera worked before digital cameras. The shutter moved from left to right (or right to left). The first part moved left to right opening the shutter, then when fully opened waited and then second part moved left to right to close. If the shutter speed was about 1/60th of a second the entire frame was being exposed at once. For shorter times (1/125, 1/250, etc) the closing side started closing before the opening side arrived, thus an open slit moved across the film. So even a 1/1000th shot took 1/60th of a second to complete.

In digital cameras you can have a rolling shutter or global shutter. Rolling shutter works the same way as analog SLRs. The pixels are scanned from left to right, top to bottom (or some other rotated pattern like this) The exposure time is how long each pixel counts photons, but the overall scanning time can be much longer.
In a global shutter camera all pixels count their accumulated photons starting at the same time and end at the same time. These are more expensive.

Mike
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