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Dear Fools

I have been readings as much as possible on the marketing strategy on the Breathe Right strips. It seems like they have pulled back from their "sports performance" enhancement messages and focused almost exclusively on the "Sleep better / reduce snoring" strategy.

In really considering this, I think focusing on sleep is a great strategy - Everyone sleeps once a day, and a good percentage snore or get congested every so often. Personally, I use the strips whenever I get stuffed up: ~20-30 nights a year.

However, I don't like leaving money on the table - couldn't they almost create a separate brand name to market the sports angle more. It seems like there is some potential here, but I agree that the breathe better while you have a cold, reduce snoring is a much bigger market.

Any other opinions on this?

Macklad
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However, I don't like leaving money on the table - couldn't they almost create a separate brand name to market the sports angle more. It seems like there is some potential here, but I agree that the breathe better while you have a cold, reduce snoring is a much bigger market.

I hear you, and to an extent agree with you. I don't like leaving money on the table either - and figuring out new uses for a product can add quite a lot to a company's bottom line (baking soda being used as a refridgerator/freezer deodorizer anyone?).

To the extent I might disagree with you... CNS only has a limited amount of money with which to market/advertise their product(s). The question they should be asking themselves is "Where do we get the most bang for our buck?" If the answer is 'sleep better/reduce snoring' as opposed to 'sports applications' then marking the 'sleep' angle exclusively may well be the right thing to do, even if they are leaving money on the table by not marketing the 'sports' angle. In short, the company might be leaving more money on the table by marketing the sports angle, as those resources could have been put into marketing the sleep angle (with a better return).

Once market dominance and relative saturation in the primary market (as a sleep/snoring aid) are achieved, then it will likely make a great deal of sense to begin pushing into secondary/alternate use markets. Arm & Hammer began marketing as a refridgerator/freezer deodorizer only after its baking soda was in the dominant position with regard to the more 'traditional' and widely-used applications. I think CNS might be very well served to follow in these footsteps.

Regards,

Eldrehad


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Eldrehad

I agree about the limited amount of cash to invest. Perhaps developing international markets is their best investment right now.

Macklad
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Macklad,

I own CNS as well. Marketing for the better sleep at night is more preferred in my opinion given the size of the market. Sports marketing isn't cheap if you decide on a commercial or promotions through the athletes. They are getting free marketing in football every time they show a player on the sidelines who happens to be wearing a strip. I don't watch much basketball or baseball so I don't know how much they are used in these sports if at all.

Perhaps a grass roots type of effort would be more appropriate in sports. Give out samples to the local high schools and colleges. Perhaps this is already done to some extent by the company.

From my own experience, I just used the products over the holidays when I had a cold. The nose strips helped with my breathing and the vapor shot lit my brain on fire, but it did work. My older daughter likes the vapor strips when she has a cold.

My mother who has a chronic sinus condition does not have any success with the products.


I haven't tried to use a nose strip when playing hockey. If I remember I'll put one on tommorrow.

Carl
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