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I'm making a wedding quilt (it's the one on the cover of this book http://www.amazon.com/Quick-Star-Quilts-Beyond-Classroom-Tes...) and am looking for suggestions on how to mark the background which is a light cream tone-on-tone. The colors in the star are sort of fall colors, but the background is that light cream, so I am wondering how to mark it so that I can machine quilt it.

I typically use a white iron-eraseable chalk, but that doesn't show up on the light background. I am reluctant to use the blue brush-off chalk as I am not at all sure that it will really brush off.

Anyone have any suggestions?
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I've heard good things about Frixion pens, but I haven't tried them. They are supposed to wash out very easily. But then, I wash a quilt after I finish it, and not everyone is in that camp.

I would test whatever method you select on some scraps first.


Cosmos
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I've used a blue pen that disappears with a little water. Have no idea what the brand is, where I got it or anything but it does work. I do think you have to make sure to get it all out before any ironing because heat may actually make it permanent.

Yeah, not much help am I?

RM
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Can you test the blue brush off stuff on a scrap piece to see how it will react?

I'm going to take a stab that you don't typically wash a quilt after it's completed?

LWW
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I usually use a blue washout marker or a mechanical pencil, H lead .5mm. Actually, depending on the quilting patter, you may not need to mark it at all. Practice on the same fabric and batting you used in the quilt, and you may be surprised at your results. There are tons of video tutorials.


Isewquilts
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I just checked out "1,000 Clever Sewing Shortcuts & Tips" from the library. I haven't tried any of these, but one or more might help you.

- If you need to transfer long, straight lines from your pattern to your project pieces, use masking tape. First, fold the pattern along the marking line and position the pattern on the project piece. Then align the tape with the fabric, next to the pattern fold. Mark the tape to indicate which edge is the reference so you don't forget after the pattern has been removed. When you sew, be careful not to stitch the masking tape!

Personally, I'd use painters tape instead of masking tape.

- Use Tide to Go stain remover pen to remove marks made by fabric marking pens. Do before pressing, because the markings can become permanent. If the marks reappear when you add steam, go over them again with the TTG pen.

- I was having trouble removing tailor's chalk from a sand-washed fabric until I rubbed it with a leftover piece of heavy flannel. The chalk was gone after a few strokes.

Hope one of these helps.
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If you need to transfer long, straight lines from your pattern to your project pieces, use masking tape. First, fold the pattern along the marking line and position the pattern on the project piece. Then align the tape with the fabric, next to the pattern fold. Mark the tape to indicate which edge is the reference so you don't forget after the pattern has been removed. When you sew, be careful not to stitch the masking tape!

Knitters use something called Highlighter tape.

http://www.yarn.com/product/webs-knitting-crochet-accessorie...

We use it to mark which line of a pattern we're knitting, and it's picked up and removed constantly. It also sticks to clothing. (I just experimented). It comes in a variety of colors, too, and it's see through. Would something like that work?

Nancy
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