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What is the best potato to use for making mashed potatoes? Last time I tried russets which didn't mash too well.

..IF
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Being from Idaho and having served and eatten Idaho Russett potatoes for all my life, I've had no problems with mashing them. Peel and boil until done then mash with a little milk and butter. Nothing better as a side dish. You can have your rice and dressing, but a potato, either mashed, baked or fried, makes a great side dish. You must have had a potato from another state and not from Idaho!!
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While I am closer to a novice then an expert regarding mashed potatoes... I just mashed some Russetts without a problem yesterday; exactly as nampa45 suggested: with milk and butter.

I learned the key is boiling them until they're completely done. If you don't you'll have lumps. Some folks like 'em, I don't.

Any other good mashers?


B*Mann
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Most potatoes will mash okay if not under/over cooked but less starchy (new potatoes) are easier to work with than baking type potatoes. There are lots of various opinions on methods/additions etc, I like to add a little nutmeg.
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I use the little round red ones.....I forget what they're called <sheepish grin>
Sonja
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I've had good luck with russets, but I have to make sure that the potatoes are completely done before mashing.

Also, technique helps -- a food mill makes nice mashers. I personally use a potato ricer, then add sauteed onions (cooked in some butter unti they're golden), salt, pepper, and nutmeg. No cream for me, thank you.

CK
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~the little round red ones.....I forget what they're called~

Little Red Potatoes (grin). According to my late, great, grandpa. A true potato lover for all time.

He boiled them, sliced as he ate, with a dab of butter and some pickled herring.

YUM.

J.
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Little Red Potatoes (grin).

<rofl>

He boiled them, sliced as he ate, with a dab of butter and some pickled herring.

Hm...Interesting choice:-)
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You must have had a potato from another state and not from Idaho!!

That must be it. Normally I use just about any kind of potato. The last time I used russets. The mashed potatoes turned out yellowish instead of white and didn't have a smooth consistent texture. It kind of had a cottage cheeze type texture.

I always mash my potatoes by hand.

..IF
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I like Red potatoes for mashing. I keep the skin on and it adds a little color to the mashed potato. I also add chicken broth to the potato instead of skim milk. Drops the points of mashed potato and it tastes yummy!

Linda
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I've used all kinds, but primarily Idahos for mashing and red potatoes for potato salad. Because I hate to peel potatoes and have yet to teach my cats (due to unopposing thumbs, I suppose), I just throw them in a pot whole. Boil with some salt. After a few minutes, I "knife" a potato and the skin slips off under running cold water. Then I put it back in the pot to finish cooking.

I mash them several ways: sometimes by adding chicken broth, which is VERY low calorie, and sometimes by adding sour cream, which is very creamy. After I smush them with a masher, I whip 'em with an electric beater.

Tossing in some roasted garlic is very yummy, too.

elizabeth
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Tossing in some roasted garlic is very yummy, too.

boiling garlic cloves with the potatoes is great also.

I've also used plain yogurt in my mashed potatoes also.

However I usually steam the garlic cloves with my greenbeans.

Linda
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Linda, do you steam the garlic cloves whole, sliced, or diced with the green beans? Thanks.
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I always use Idaho Russet potatoes and don't have any problems. Be sure to thoroughly cook. I use a hand mixer to mash and also use a dash of fresh ground pepper and chicken broth instead of the milk and butter.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Cathy
:)
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Some like Katahdin but I prefer Kennebec for white skinned taters. I like Red Pontiac better than both of those. For new potatoes to mash or any use Red Norland are the only way to go for white fleshed spuds. Again I'd rather go with Red Gold or Rose Gold yellows which are hard to find in markets. Green Mountain makes for a pretty decent russet.

Devin
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What is the best potato to use for making mashed potatoes? Last time I tried russets which didn't mash too well.

Hmmm. I've found russets absolutely the best for mashing. What problem did you have, and how did you go about doing it?

TMF ExRO
Phil Marti
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I also add chicken broth to the potato instead of skim milk.

Those of us desperate for butterfat in our diets would never think of using white water, a/k/a skim milk, in mashed potatoes.

TMF ExRO
Phil Marti
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IndyFool,

I don't think I can add much to previous replies. I've never had trouble mashing russets or all-purpose or new potatoes, so maybe the problem was that yours weren't cooked enough (as several people have said).

Joy of Cooking recommends russets for mashed potatoes. "When cooked, their flesh is dry and fluffy, exactly right for baking, frying, and mashing (even though they are boiled)." Russets will not hold their shape in stews or potato salad, but otherwise Joy likes them for almost any potato use.

They make the distinction between "boilers" (high moisture and low starch) and "bakers" (low moisture, high-starch, described as mealy). Russets are bakers, all new potatoes are boilers. All-purpose potatoes are halfway between boilers and bakers.

There are a couple of caveats they mention. "Russet potatoes that are either baked or boiled for mashing should be eaten or mashed right away, because they will lose their fluffy texture if left to stand."

Also, "keep potatoes out of aluminum and iron pots, where they will turn grey." I haven't had this problem; my usual pots are either stainless steel or aluminum with a nonstick coating.

- PJ
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Yukon Gold. Accept no substitutes. Try to get organic ones if you can.
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redsavina: Yukon Gold.

Took the words right out of my mouth. If you try them, you'll never go back. The preparations already described in this thread, the garlic, the cream vs. milk, the milk vs. chicken broth etc., are all just fine and I wouldn't advocate that anyone change. But as for the potato substrate, it's a revelation how much better they are than standard potato varieties.

I'm not advocating YG for everything -- they don't bake up very well compared to Idahos. And I think I will still use the small red Bliss potatoes for what I call organic Vichyssoise, where I don't peel the taters. But aside from that, you've gotta try them. They aren't even much more costly than regular potatoes these days.
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Hmmm. I've found russets absolutely the best for mashing. What problem did you have, and how did you go about doing it?

Somehow I must have either bought bad potatoes or overcooked them last time. I am glad to report that the mashed potatoes turned out great this time. I cooked up 10 lbs for Thanksgiving lunch at work.

..IF

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Somehow I must have either bought bad potatoes or overcooked them last time. I am glad to report that the mashed potatoes turned out great this time. I cooked up 10 lbs for Thanksgiving lunch at work.

Actually you can get potatoes grown in soil lacking in potassium and end up with poor results. The potatoes will tend to be soggy after cooking and often the cooks think they have over done them where actually that isn't the case at all. You can't tell before hand.

Yukon Golds are OK too. I don't grow them anymore having found the afore mentioned red/yellows to be superior varieties which yield better and have better texture as well as flavor. My customers rave over them so keep your eyes open for them. Look in specialty and farm markets for them. You may get lucky.

Devin
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>>I always mash my potatoes by hand.

..IF
<<

Yef???

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I don't grow them anymore having found the afore mentioned red/yellows to be superior varieties which yield better and have better texture as well as flavor. My customers rave over them so keep your eyes open for them. Look in specialty and farm markets for them. You may get lucky.

We grew red potatoes when I was a kid. Freshly dug potatoes always tasted great.

..IF
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Any other good mashers?

I love "smashed" potatoes. I usually cut into chunks then boil to speen up the process. Also, adding cheese is a wonderful touch.
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Mashed potatoes are my downfall. I just don't have the knack. Several years ago, my parents where taking care of my kids the day after Thanksgiving. My mother was searching in the fridge for something to feed them and found what she thought was tapioca. You guessed -- it was left-over mashed potatoes.

I'm ashamed to admit it, but I'm buying the freezer kind of mashed potatoes to avoid stress and confusion with tapioca.

BUT you must know that the very best potatoes are red potatoes from the Red River Valley in North Dakota. Honest.

Gail
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That must be it. Normally I use just about any kind of potato. The last time I used russets. The mashed potatoes turned out yellowish instead of white and didn't have a smooth consistent texture. It kind of had a cottage cheeze type texture.
I always mash my potatoes by hand.


If you cooked the potatoes whole before mashing them, you may have had one that was bad on the inside and you did not know it. This is another reason that I cut them up before cooking.
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"adding cheese is a wonderful touch."

Oh, YES! And don't forget the chopped green onion tops or chives, and sour cream. Why not some bacon bits, too? Presto, imitation baked potatoes.

Ray
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I agree with redsavina, JABoa and farminfool. Yukon Golds have the best flavor if you can get them.
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