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I don't eat low carb. So this isn't exactly low carb. What continues to surprise me is the simplicity of meals that I eat these days.

Brunch: Banana pancake/omelette (one banana and two eggs mixed together with baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg) cooked in butter. Add frozen blueberries for the filling. Served with butter and maple syrup.

Supper: Grilled salmon with grilled asparagus.

There were snacks, of course. We do our cooking for the week on Sundays, so I also had a variety of veggies and a little grilled chicken as afternoon snacks, and nuts, raisins, crystallized ginger, and unsweetened chocolate for my evening snack.

Like I said, not low carb. But so simple in comparison to how I used to eat. That part is really interesting to me.

ThyPeace, has decided to become certified as an Executive Coach and nutrition coach. Because it's time to connect with and help other people get to their goals.
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Yesterday...
BR--jarlsberg melted on thin-slice rye toast & coffee
LU--red cabbage slaw & green tea
DN--BBQ chicken legs & green bean salad, strawberries

Today...
BR--rye toast w/cream cheese, lox, onion & capers and coffee
LU--Greek salad, kombucha
DN--asparaus soup & leftover chicken legs, strawberries

Tomorrow...
BR--almond-flour pancakes w/strawberry sauce and coffee
LU--cole slaw & a leftover chicken leg
DN--asparagus soup, pan-fried salmon, cauliflower rice

If I eat enough fat, I don't feel the urge to snack between meals. But we eat dinner early, and I do crave chompables in the evening. Usually nuts.
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What continues to surprise me is the simplicity of meals that I eat these days

Sounds like you've discovered the concept of Sensory Specific Satiety Since childhood, I've pretty much always eaten/cooked "simple" or "clean". To the extent that my husband often comments that those 5 ingredient cookbooks you see around have 3 to many ingredients for me.

I credit my mum with instilling a tradition of monotonous cooking in me. Always felt a bit guilty about my seeming laziness until a series of nutrition lectures I took about 10 or so years back. The lecturer mentioned this (SSS) and quoted various researchers in the field ((Barbara Rolls for but one name to Google, if interested) Was quite empowering to realise that I .... and my mum before me.... was embracing cutting edge science.
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So the hubster spied the leftover chicken legs and wanted one with Greek salad lunch, so instead of chicken legs again for dinner, I made a tofu stir fry w/broccoli, shiitake mushrooms, onion, garlic, ginger, oyster sauce, fermented bean paste, Japanese hot pepper blend (has seaweed and sesame seeds in it), sesame oil, a little broth. Yum--umami goodness!
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Sounds like you've discovered the concept of Sensory Specific Satiety

Could be, though I think of it differently than that old "eat the same thing and you'll get bored with it sooner" meme. Instead, I have found foods that seem to genuinely satisfy me more completely than the ones I used to eat.

Though it didn't show up in my Sunday meals, one interesting example for me been to replace fruits, which I used to eat at nearly every meal, with legumes. That one replacement alone probably accounts for 20% of the weight I have lost. Breakfast lentils, in particular, mean that I stay full and satisfied for hours longer than I used to. The beans/chickpeas I usually have at lunch are not quite as satisfying, but close.

For many years, I was hungry almost all of the time. As I have removed sugars (in various forms) from my diet, that hunger has steadily eased. The legumes were the last of a long series of steps in that direction, and one that I wish I had found earlier.

ThyPeace, over the weekend, I was STILL full after the legumes last week, and ate lightly the whole weekend and into yesterday. I find that this happens fairly frequently.
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I credit my mum with instilling a tradition of monotonous cooking in me.

"Monotonous" and "simple" are not automatically synonyms. "Simple" can be enormously flavorful and varied and healthy and satisfying.

=sheila
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I'm sure it can..... but the whole concept behind Sensory Specific Satiety is that it's not enormously flavourful and varied and doesn't need to be in order to be healthy and satisfying. In fact, the flavourful variety is what can tempt one to eat more. The food industry is well aware of this phenom and puts it to great use in order to make food hyper palatable.

In fact, David Katz produced a diet book a few years back with this in mind called The Flavor Full diet. It's a bit Rodaley and full of anecdotes but it was basically an elimination diet, focusing on eliminating flavours not food groups etc. Having the dieters get used to eating just one flavor type at a time before adding variety back. Very convoluted but the idea being to retrain satiety centers and rehab taste buds that had become accustomed to the the plethora of flavours and mouth feel that's the norm with*engineered* food. He claimed success..... but then he would, wouldn't he.
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In fact, the flavourful variety is what can tempt one to eat more. The food industry is well aware of this phenom and puts it to great use in order to make food hyper palatable.

I thought you knew it has nothing to do with true flavor, but with specific addictive sweeteners, etc, that stimulate the cravings and cause a loss of touch with sensations of satiety.

It's not eliminating flavorful foods and cooking that promotes satiety, but eliminating the processed sh*t. And I can also well see that someone saddled with boring cooking will compensate by overeating on tasty stuff elsewhere, processed or not.

=sheila
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it's not enormously flavourful and varied...

I dunno, VeeEnn. Every Oreo is identical, with no variations in flavor throughout the whole package. I can still eat ALL OF THEM.

ThyPeace, stays far away from that stuff.
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Every Oreo is identical, with no variations in flavor throughout the whole package

Indeed. But take a look at the ingredients of each one. The plethora of flavours doesn't mean that you have multiple different flavours in a box but rather within a single cookie..... oftentimes flavours that you can't readily identify if your taste buds have been conditioned that way.

You've got salt, sweet, fat etc. (pretty much everything but umami in a single cookie) Per the Sensory Specific Satiety principle, it'll take you longer to feel satiety with this concoction than with fewer ingredients.

Or maybe they taste nice. I wouldn't know...... I can't imagine eating anything with that rap sheet. It looks like the perfect recipe to encourage the "just one more" reflex.
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And I can also well see that someone saddled with boring cooking will compensate by overeating on tasty stuff elsewhere

"Monotonous" and "boring" aren't automatically synonyms.
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"Monotonous" and "boring" aren't automatically synonyms.

I think that is a unique point of view.

Well....monotonous can also be tedious. But....endlessly tedious is....boring.
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