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No. of Recommendations: 5
New person here. Just starting out.

Been going through tons of materials trying to find a good fit for my personality and goals.

Found out quickly that Motley Fool recommendations are far too bland and over valued. I have been emailing repeatedly to have a refund within the 30 days.

So far, no responses from actual humans. They instead say a canned response about how Covid is somehow making their responses slower than usual and that it can take "more than 48 hours". Well... that is certain BS. I mean we live in a digital age with remote work options all over the place. There is zero reason to accept this crap. It just means Motley Fool has not staffed up per the demand when it comes to actual customer service and billing concerns.

I am now quickly growing in love with how much I hate the Motley Fool as a company. Their marketing is insidious... always hinting that you as a regular person are going to miss out on the next big thing because.... our CEO has the BILLIONAIRS ear....

And then recommend to buy stocks that are already high and sell when they are already at the bottom of the ocean! I mean, we can do better by watching the news or going with competition.

I pray you all get what you want out of investing.... but this... this is just a big ol pile of dookie on a stick.

Sincerely,

A clearly functioning angry former customer.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
My friend, I'm also JUST starting my investing journey and as luck would have it, this seems to be an absolutely horrible time to start.
The market has been absolutely horrendous this week. I was up 15% over the last month, and in only two days, I'm now down 11% on my initial investments. Motley's picks are solid, we're just entering at potentially the worst possible time. The stocks themselves are not the problem; it's the rich aasholes and panic sellers that are responsible for what's currently happening.

I'm at a loss, honestly, and I completely understand where you're coming from. If it makes you feel any better, I've spent more than $5k on TMF picks this year and so far, I would be far better off having done nothing at all. Disappointed to say the least.
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No. of Recommendations: 4
I am up 17% on EPD plus have received some nice dividend checks with that stock. A Fools recommended buy. Do you research and don't be so quick to pull the trigger in selling. I have ridden out some dogs - IMGN I bought at 5 and it went down to 3, now up to 9.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Same Here. Lost 23% in 5 days on my Motley fool suggestions. Luckily I didn't put that much into their picks yet and only lost $7,500. In 30 years of investing I have never done this poorly, this quickly. When you recommend stocks with a 300 - 600 p/e it's bound to happen. I was stupid for listening to them but won't make that mistake again. I am happy I didn't buy into that Lemonade stock suggestion or it would be worse. I have no confidence in the suggested picks at this point. I came here for some stocks with upside but all they got is momentum stocks which have lost their momentum. I guess I'll wade into the refund method to try to get back at least my enrollment fee.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
What bad timing! I’m sorry to hear your not happy with your Motley Fool investment. I bought MF many years ago, invested in some of their stocks then didn’t renew. Years later I recognized that my winners were their recommendations.

I bought back in a few years ago and have watched my portfolio grow. It’s been a painful time recently but I have learned that this is a buying opportunity (if you have cash) and am buying stocks that look to be on sale.

MF used to be a costly investment, but I’ve grown so much with them that now their cost is absorbed by my winners.
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No. of Recommendations: 5
Dude, buy and HOLD. 3-5 years. If you’re a newbie, quit trying to be a day-trader. Buy....and HOLD
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Hi, I understand that holding is a crucial measure. However, when you just get into the market - and rapidly lose value - you keep asking yourself whether that was a wise time? Since it feels as if I could possess x2 stocks by now, had I waited.

At today's market - this market keeps rapidly going down - as I lose value by the minute, I'm down 15% already, and no idea whether to stay, or to get out till the Stock "selloff avalanch" ends. (Already down more than 50% at the recommendation of LMND)

Are you advising this out of experience with the motley?
And is there any place I can read about selloff points like these?
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No. of Recommendations: 1
"Hi, I understand that holding is a crucial measure. However, when you just get into the market - and rapidly lose value - you keep asking yourself whether that was a wise time? Since it feels as if I could possess x2 stocks by now, had I waited.

At today's market - this market keeps rapidly going down - as I lose value by the minute, I'm down 15% already, and no idea whether to stay, or to get out till the Stock "selloff avalanch" ends. (Already down more than 50% at the recommendation of LMND)

Are you advising this out of experience with the motley?
And is there any place I can read about selloff points like these?"

What are your alternatives to holding?

1) Sell and take the loss. However, now you will need to make back the 15%-50% loss in addition to another 10-15% for your return. I don't think you're going to find any reopening stock that's going to give you that.

2) Try to time the market with swing trades within TMF stocks. Most people lose at this.

If you truly think the market is going to plunge further, why don't you short the stocks and make all your money back?
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No. of Recommendations: 1
The point is not to look for "selloff points" but to look for companies whose stock you're willing to hold through volatility (aka noise).

The likelihood of you picking the perfect time to buy back in is just too slim to justify the hassle of constantly moving in and out of positions. Maybe if your aim is to be a day trader, but certainly not if your aim is to be an investor in quality businesses.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Hi New Person (Clearly Functioning Angry Former Customer),

Even the best, generational wealth building companies have experienced huge draw downs on their way to becoming big winners. All the FANAMA stocks have suffered such paths to winning big. It takes time: many, many, many years for compounding to take effect.

Look at Warren Buffet, whose wealth, the majority of which has been generated after age 65, even though he started investing at age 11, or something crazy young like that.

In the short-term, Mr. Market is a voting machine but in the long-term, Mr. Market is a weighing machine and stock prices follow revenue growth higher over time. If you want exceptional results, you have to be willing to hold for an exceptional period of time and tune out the noise.

Individual stock picking is very hard, and if you bat .600 you are killing the game! In fact, only 4% of stocks have driven Mr. Market up over time, but TMF has proven they've been able to identify the winners sooner, and are willing to hold them longer, than most other investors, and that's how we WIN against the market.

Be a student of history. Learn and trust that equities are the greatest way to generate wealth and be confident in your own due diligence. I do want to say that just because TMF makes a recommendation doesn't mean you have to buy every singe rec.

A little of my history: I purchased a Stock Advisor membership in December 2019, and saw a steep drawn down, almost -40% in March 2020, but I never gave up and by the end of 2020 I posted +75% gains for the year (which is also exceptional and very unlikely to repeat, this I know). Great returns can be had, but you have to trust the process and zoom out on your timeline of expectations. Time in the market > timing the market.

I do hope you stick around, New Person, and learn these Fools are incredible folks with a very optimistic view on the future with values and perspectives I align with and want to invest with. If you choose to leave this community, I wish you the best of luck, as I'm sure all Fools do.

Foolishly,

IndyAnthony
https://boards.fool.com/profile/IndyAnthony/info.aspx
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No. of Recommendations: 1
"If you truly think the market is going to plunge further, why don't you short the stocks and make all your money back?"

This argument always strikes me as disingenuous because it ignores the obvious risk/reward flip for shorting stocks. Long: 100% risk, infinite max potential. Short: infinite risk, 100% max potential. I know I'm not about to take infinite risk for a potential 100% max gain, and neither are most people.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
But why would I buy them when high if I know they're about to crash? today I need to recover 100% in order to break even (SKLZ stock) while it dropped more than 50% than when I bought it.
Means if it doubles its value - I lose big time.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
One of the first stocks I bought on my own (i.e., without recommendation) was Square, making me the proud owner of two shares at $56 a pop! Regret is a charming thing (as in, "if only I bought a bunch more, wow!"). It could have gone either way, given how much (or rather, how little) experience I had then. I got lucky with Square. So, like other investors who went with the MF recommendation to add a little LMND to their portfolio, it has been a nail-biting experience to watch it go down down down. In fact, all of the stock I added based on MF recommendations has been going down. BUT (and we're talking big "BUT" here), I'm having to really discipline myself out of the day-trader mentality and trust the long term, which is absolutely something I have no experience with. Sales pitch and flashing neon signs aside, MF couldn't have the host of long-time followers if they didn't have a solid track record. Their strategy definitely does not fit the exciting day-trader habit, and waiting 3-5 years to see if a recommendation was actually a good one is REALLY difficult. Tortoise and hare--who was it that won again? We'll check back in 2026...
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No. of Recommendations: 4
Hi MaFrawg & all,

Back a few years, we experienced a down-draft on our portfolio from a high at the end of June 2007 to a bottom on Mar 9, 2009. This started 2 years after we retired and 2 years before we could touch our retirement accounts and close to 5 years to start SSA.

I didn't have a good plan to use cash then and I "dumped" all the portfolio cash we had in our IRA's on Dec 29, 2008. At that point, it was close to 30% of our portfolio.

One of the companies I invested in was Ford (F) at $2.45/share.

Well, the markets continued to drop through March 9. Ford was trading around $1.20/share.

Maybe it wasn't such a good investment, right?

Well, on January 6, 2011, I sold 1/3 of our shares at $18.05/share.

Questions: Was it a mistake to invest in Ford? Did that 50+% drop in value really hurt us? Would it have been better to wait a few months to invest?


I will answer the last question: While looking back at history, it is EASY to see the exact date a price point to buy Ford.

However, looking forward, we only know what has happened. While we can guess about the future. Most "forecasts" by the "experts" are don't really pan out. Many are off by months and most are badly over-stated.

What it all boils down to is: don't sweat the short-term ruminations of the market.

Does that help you?

Gene
All holdings and some statistics on my Fool profile page
http://my.fool.com/profile/gdett2/info.aspx
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