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A sparrow (I think) http://www.fotolog.net/edit_photo.html?photo_id=99849

A fledgeling house finch (I think) http://www.fotolog.net/edit_photo.html?photo_id=99846

Another sparrow (?) in a drain vent of a building's wall http://www.fotolog.net/edit_photo.html?photo_id=97360

If anyone would care to correct or inform me which birds are what, I'd be very happy. I've spent hours on CalPhoto ( http://elib.cs.berkeley.edu/photos/ ) trying to nail these birds down to no avail.

- T.
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A sparrow (I think)
http://www.fotolog.net/edit_photo.html?photo_id=99849


these links don't work (for me)
notice the "edit"


-jp
.....likes your pix
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these links don't work (for me)
notice the "edit"


CRUD! Sorry about that.




A sparrow (I think) http://www.fotolog.net/teragram/?photo_id=99849

A fledgeling house finch (I think) http://www.fotolog.net/teragram/?photo_id=99846

Another sparrow (I think) http://www.fotolog.net/teragram/?photo_id=97360
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Your pictures came through fine for me. Thanks.

Your last sparrow looks like a House Sparrow. Their black mask makes them look like bandits. It think its an attractive bird. We've discussed House Sparrows before on this board and how German immigrants imported them because sparrows made them feel at home. Some think they may be a religious symbol. They also tend to make their nests in the eaves of tradional German homes, but nobody would ever say if there are superstitions or traditions along the lines of "No happiness in a house where the sparrows wouldn't nest."

On your house finch, depends on how large he is. The beak color makes me think starling (but I am definitely not an expert).

I would be nice to hear from the experts on these guys.
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On your house finch, depends on how large he is. The beak color makes me think starling (but I am definitely not an expert).

The reason I thought house finch is because of a bird nearby which was apparently calling to the fledgeling and to whom the fledgeling did fly when I got too close. Also, you can see hints of that particular red around his beak and eye.

I just compared the fledgeling to the pic I took of the adult house finch http://www.fotolog.net/teragram/?photo_id=62021

and... well I can't tell about the beak. The two birds' heads are at different angles. The shape seems about right though.

I too would love to hear from "the experts".

- T.
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"I too would love to hear from "the experts".

I'll take a stab at this as these birds are year-round residents in my yard, one even nested there a few weeks ago. (See my earlier thread chronicling the baby's day to day progress.) The bird's stance, the way it hangs its wing when resting, the eye and beak color as well as the slight coloration under the chin makes me think this is a California Towhee, aka Pacific Brown Towhee. See full description of it here:

http://birds.cornell.edu/BOW/CALTOW/

The illustration exaggerates their faint orange bib and the slight orange/rust colored glow the adults present on their undertail coverts; in real life those colors are much more muted and the birds appear to be plain female finches but with a longer tail. What identifies these birds more than anything else is the way they scratch for food: they hop and kick with both feet together. They usually fly close to the ground, pumping their tail.

~aj
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I'll take a stab at this as these birds are year-round residents in my yard, one even nested there a few weeks ago. (See my earlier thread chronicling the baby's day to day progress.) The bird's stance, the way it hangs its wing when resting, the eye and beak color as well as the slight coloration under the chin makes me think this is a California Towhee, aka Pacific Brown Towhee. See full description of it here:


looked like a Towhee to me also.....

but they're so much bigger than finches, don't think one could mistake one for
the other.


-j
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I think your fist picture looks like a song sparrow. Take a look.

http://tinyurl.com/b52b

I don't know about the second one, but the third one could be either a black-throated sparrow, or a house sparrow. First url below is for the black throated sparrrow and second one is for a house sparrow.

http://tinyurl.com/b52r

http://tinyurl.com/b53o

Without a better look at the sparrow I would guess a black throated sparrow....but I am no expert.

As to the second one I remember you seeing an adult House Finch in the area recently...was there an adult one near the baby if so you may be right.

;)

StarWarrior-Rie


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The reason I thought house finch is because of a bird nearby which was apparently calling to the fledgeling and to whom the fledgeling did fly when I got too close.

Then your guess is probably correct.

;)

StarWarrior-Rie
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Your photos are not coming up for me, or I would be willing to try.
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OK, I've just checked the repaired links.

Pic # 1 is Song Sparrow.

Pic # 2 is likely immature House Finch although I would like to see more of the bird from another angle.

Pic # 3 is adult male English Sparrow. This is an "old World" sparrow not closely related to our native sparrows.

If you can learn all three of these birds, it will aid you considerably in identifying more difficult finches and sparrows. I am impressed by the quality of your photographs -- nice job!
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Pic # 3 is adult male English Sparrow. This is an "old World" sparrow not closely related to our native sparrows.

Papers and articles I have read on Sparrows say that the Common House Sparrow is the English Sparrow.

;)

StarWarrior-Rie
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If you can learn all three of these birds, it will aid you considerably in identifying more difficult finches and sparrows.

I'm trying. I don't have any books on the topic and the resources on the web are... frustrating, to say the least. I keep hoping to find some soft of logic engine. If I had time (and knew what I was talking about) maybe I'd even develop one. I think such a tool would be useful.



I am impressed by the quality of your photographs -- nice job!

Thank you very much.

- T.
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"I don't have any books on the topic and the resources on the web are... frustrating, to say the least."

Check your local library; I bet you'll find a number of reference books. Our public library has so many bird books, when one is due for return, I just pick up another in its place. One visit every three weeks, and I'm supplied year round.

~aj

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