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There are a bunch of sites about "move to, and retire in" places like Mexico, and I realize Canada isn't the cheapest place on earth, but..

Does anyone have experience with, or solid sources about moving from the US to Canada, for someone who can prove to Canadian officials they have the means to support their basic needs through a combination of jobs and investment income? Personal experience and firsthand knowledge, as well as reputable and concise (not book length..) sources on how to start researching whether a move to Canada in the decade before full retirement is for you, would be appreciated (debates about whether the healthcare and taxes etc equation really is in your favor if you move from US to Canada, let's please save for another place or a separate thread!) Thanks,
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Does anyone have experience with, or solid sources about moving from the US to Canada, for someone who can prove to Canadian officials they have the means to support their basic needs through a combination of jobs and investment income? Personal experience and firsthand knowledge, as well as reputable and concise (not book length..) sources on how to start researching whether a move to Canada in the decade before full retirement is for you, would be appreciated (debates about whether the healthcare and taxes etc equation really is in your favor if you move from US to Canada, let's please save for another place or a separate thread!) Thanks,

I'm not going into any of the reasons why, but you do know many Canadians move south when they retire, don't you? That would make me question the advisability of moving there for retirement.
Kathleen
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I had a friend who moved to Canada a few years ago, and it wasn't easy. They make it quite difficult to emigrate there. I would think as a retiree it would be almost impossible.

There's a whole series of items that can give you "points" towards qualification - speaking French/English, educational background, working in a particularly valued job, etc. And you need to show resources to support yourself. I think it's quite hard for retirees with no family there to emigrate to Canada. They don't want people not working & drawing from health care system.

I've known quite a few Canadians who have spent their working lives in the US return to Canada to retire, but have seen few Americans retire there.

http://www.visabureau.com/canada/emigration-to-canada.aspx
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In the '80s there were stories of declining birth rates in Canada, and they were still welcoming new comers with open arms. But not refugees (so much). They do want people able to support themselves.

When Hong Kong's lease expired in what '96?, Canada opened its arms to businessmen who wanted not to take a chance on Communism.

So you are not surprised to encounter some bureauracy in trying to immigrate, but for those with means of support, they will probably accept you. But the more British style of doing things suggests you should not expect a warm welcome. It will take a while to feel at home. It helps if you have relatives there.
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Yeah, apparently one reason not many people from the US retire in Canada is because Canada makes it so hard. There's some threads I found on early-retirement.org and there's one route where (these numbers may be outdated) you give them a 5 year 400,000 loan (interest free of course) that's not the only route but it's one route..

In my case it would not be retirement as I said but being at a place where there's enough money to retire just barely, but choosing to work part time..here in the US good luck to you trying to that and afford health insurance. There you might be able to live off of 4% of what's left over after the 5 year loan, if you're the frugal type. Meanwhile Canada gets my taxes while I'm there so why should they care if the income I'm paying taxes on is fulltime work, PT plus investment income or fully investment income..By being younger, pre-retirement (say 50) Canada's actuaries should hopefully see it as easy to say "yes" since it would be more years of my paying taxes before the likelihood of major illness etc, compared to someone trying to move there at age 60 or 65..

Aside..IMO it's not just being able to afford health insurance..that's the lesser downside of staying in the US..the bigger downside is that even if you have insurance, if you get something big like cancer, they'll go back and fine some tiny clause and twist is in an effort to not pay or not pay you fully...lots of examples of this, sadly. Sadly, the made-up horror stories about Canada's system (people there are still shocked to hear you get to pick your own doctor, etc, unlike many of us here)..so no matter who wins in Nov, in 2012 we'll (probably) still lack what every other industrialized country has, a public nonprofit 'medicare for all' which is what europe, japan, australia, etc, not just "those silly canadians" but everyone else has. Ok, fire away, I'm putting on my flame proof suite...I guess one positive thing about all the dishonest horror stories about Canada (or Netherlands or anyone else) is when Americans people believe it, I'll have fewer people competing with me in applying to Canada...not that I want to do that, I'll give us till 2015 maybe before giving up. Thanks for input and respect other people's personal choices. Wish one and all good luck in the FIRE adventure!
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P.S. this isn't exactly a communist rag, as one source, now is it:

http://www.businessweek.com/archives/1994/b336351.arc.htm

if you read it all the way through and still think they're crazy, and I'm crazy, well so be it. We do actually have another shot since now again US businesses are hurting badly from costs (that was a reason for this 90s article) since 2000-2008 health care costs have soared..
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Sadly, the made-up horror stories about Canada's system (people there are still shocked to hear you get to pick your own doctor, etc, unlike many of us here)..so no matter who wins in Nov, in 2012 we'll (probably) still lack what every other industrialized country has, a public nonprofit 'medicare for all' which is what europe, japan, australia, etc, not just "those silly canadians" but everyone else has.

Just one question, if Canadian healthcare is so fantastic, why do so many Canadians come to the US for heathcare?
Oh, and please do not tell me how this is all a silly figment of a writer's imagination. I've been in the hospitals where they are showing up.
Kathleen
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<<Just one question, if Canadian healthcare is so fantastic, why do so many Canadians come to the US for heathcare?
Oh, and please do not tell me how this is all a silly figment of a writer's imagination. I've been in the hospitals where they are showing up.
Kathleen

>>


I think one reason is all the politicians who jump to the head of the cue along with their family members, political supporters and friends.



Seattle Pioneer
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Just one question, if Canadian healthcare is so fantastic, why do so many Canadians come to the US for heathcare?
Oh, and please do not tell me how this is all a silly figment of a writer's imagination. I've been in the hospitals where they are showing up.


My SIL is a nurse anesthetist outside of Lansing. She works for a group of opthalmologists. One day we were having this discussion and she estimated that about 1/3 of her case load is Canadian.
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Just one question, if Canadian healthcare is so fantastic, why do so many Canadians come to the US for heathcare?
Oh, and please do not tell me how this is all a silly figment of a writer's imagination. I've been in the hospitals where they are showing up.
Kathleen


From what I understand, the Canadian healthcare system (and those like it) are great when it comes to routine, preventive maintenance. However, care for more pressing matters is not as quick or sufficient. There was an interesting article last week in the NY Times (?) comparing the healthcare systems in the UK and the US. In the UK hospital, people were literally lying the hallways for hours (no rooms) with no one to attend to them or feed them. Not my idea of fantastic...

-Steph
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In the UK hospital, people were literally lying the hallways for hours (no rooms) with no one to attend to them or feed them. Not my idea of fantastic...

Oh, we get that with the US healthcare system, too. Here's a recent example: http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/obituaries/st...

Michael L. "Mike" Herrera, who helped found his family's popular chain of restaurants, died Saturday after waiting nearly 19 hours to be seen at Parkland Memorial Hospital. He was 58.
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Mr. Herrera praised the doctors who tried to save his brother's life.

"I want to commend those doctors for working on him so long and so hard trying to bring him back," Mr. Herrera said.

He also said he understands the reality of the wait.

"Anybody who goes to Parkland knows they are going to be there eight, 10, 14 hours if you go to the emergency," Mr. Herrera said. "If you're not dying or not a gunshot wound or a heart attack victim, you're going to be at the back of the line.

"Every time somebody comes in, you're going to the back of the line again," Mr. Herrera said.

Mike Herrera had health problems, including being overweight, his brother said. He did not have private health insurance.

Of the long wait, Jimmy Herrera also said: "In a sense, it's the price you pay for not having private insurance."


AJ
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<<From what I understand, the Canadian healthcare system (and those like it) are great when it comes to routine, preventive maintenance. However, care for more pressing matters is not as quick or sufficient. >>


So it's a great system as long as you don't get sick?



Seattle Pioneer
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So it's a great system as long as you don't get sick?


+++
+++


A common characteristic of socialized medicine.


sunray
a man who lived 3 yrs in the UK


;-)
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I don't have that information but I'm also interested in the topic. My wife and I have talked about that quite a bit. Hope you get some useful (to all of us) information!
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