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No. of Recommendations: 1
My experience with the AARP United Healthcare people has been excellent. For reasons unknown to me, changes of this type have always been via phone only. The plans that are offered, as I understand it, can differ by state. The plan type minimums are set by the feds. Rates are set by each state and I do assume there is no requirement that say Georgia accept a Plan N or the United choose to sell Plan N in Georgia.

As I said in my previous post - the ability to swap supplement plans and/or companies is controlled by your state's laws or insurance commission. Memory says about 10 states do not guarantee the right to change. But even if the companies are not required to let you change, the company may give you that option.

I recall reading a few years back that one of the major property insurers - maybe State Farm - got into a fight with the Florida Insurance commission. There had been a storm and lots of property claims. The insurance company wanted a rate increase bigger than the commission would accept. So the insurance company threatened to stop writing or maybe refuse renew policies. In response the Florida insurance commission said, fine do that and you will not be able to sell any insurance here. A compromise ensued.
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The Medicare Supplement minimum offerings are dictated by the Federal Government. To be sure there are small (or very small) differences in the form of additional coverages. Maybe eye glass repairs up to some dollar amount.

I have observed what matters most is the customer service. We have dealt with the AARP endorsed side of United Healthcare in TN & GA and found them to be excellent. I believe United Healthcare is the largest Supplement Insurance provider.

One thing to check ASAP -- does your state guarantee the option of changing Supplement Policies. The only Federal guarantee is you can get insurance at the time your start Medicare coverage. If you decide not to get a supplement or if you want to change providers (or even plans) your state's insurance commission may or may not give you that right. It should not be any surprise that is you have say a history of cancer or heart disease there is not a single supplemental insurance provider who wants to sell you insurance if they have a choice.
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intercst's web page:

https://retireearlyhomepage.com/

Please keep us informed of your quest.
I'll be following you, soon.

😷
ralph
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No. of Recommendations: 2
GWPotter:

We have been on Medicare for more than 15 years, with no complaints. To cover the deductibles and 20% not covered, we went with the AARP-suggested United Healthcare and have stayed with them ever since. No changes.

Not cheap. Costs me $470/month this year for the two of us this year ($235 each). However, we haven't paid a nickel since starting -- for doctor's visits, surgeries (several), consultations, etc. NO DENTAL coverage, sadly, and we have avoided Part D -- pharmacy -- because the doctors have kept us on generics (thankfully). Costs for Part D would have been higher, and Hannaford's drugs usually run $9.99 for 90 days.

To each his own. Look carefully and see what looks best. Good luck.

Vermonter
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Vermonter it sounds to me like you have Plan C (or something close). I had Plan C and just happen to compare to Plan N a few years back. The only difference is a Co-Pay and a deductible. Started at $10 per visit. Now it is $15 for PCP and $25 for specialist. Still that change reduced my premiums by 40% -- I figured I would need to have something like 15 or 20 office visits to have zero savings with Plan N.
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Is Plan N still there and available for swap with C? I'm sort of leery about changing plans, of course. Diddling with those folks can cause issues for months.

Vermonter
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My experience with the AARP United Healthcare people has been excellent. For reasons unknown to me, changes of this type have always been via phone only. The plans that are offered, as I understand it, can differ by state. The plan type minimums are set by the feds. Rates are set by each state and I do assume there is no requirement that say Georgia accept a Plan N or the United choose to sell Plan N in Georgia.

As I said in my previous post - the ability to swap supplement plans and/or companies is controlled by your state's laws or insurance commission. Memory says about 10 states do not guarantee the right to change. But even if the companies are not required to let you change, the company may give you that option.

I recall reading a few years back that one of the major property insurers - maybe State Farm - got into a fight with the Florida Insurance commission. There had been a storm and lots of property claims. The insurance company wanted a rate increase bigger than the commission would accept. So the insurance company threatened to stop writing or maybe refuse renew policies. In response the Florida insurance commission said, fine do that and you will not be able to sell any insurance here. A compromise ensued.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
I recommend two things you should do to get started...

1. Attend a presentation by your states SHIP (or SHIBA) office so you understand your options. This is a volunteer organization funded by a grant from Medicare

2. Get (if you don't yet have it) the annual "Medicare and You" booklet. Read it. It's an easy read but is comprehensive and covers the topic well.

BruceM
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