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Hi, and welcome to the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) post for the My Portfolio feature. If you are having trouble using My Portfolio, please read the questions and answers below. There's a good chance you'll find the answer there (OK, maybe not a good chance, but a chance anyway).

If you don't find the answers you're looking for, or to report a malfunction or other problem, just click on the Post New link above, type a brief description of your question in the Subject box, and type the full question in the large text box below it. (Do not click on the Post Reply link, or post in all caps, as this annoys the semi-friendly My Portfolio Experts who are at this very moment waiting to help.) After you type your question, click the Preview Message button, and if everything looks OK, click on “Yes, Submit Message” to post your question. You can post your notes of gushing praise using this same method, too!



Recent concerns:

Why can't I enter new purchases?
While you're viewing your portfolio, click on Modify/Add Stock (in the purple bar). You'll see a row of empty text boxes above the “I'm Done Editing” button. To add a new purchase, enter the ticker, trade date, quantity, price per share, and commission in the text boxes. Do not press the “Enter” key on your keyboard while filling in the boxes. When the information in the text boxes is complete, click on the “Go” button (on the same line as the text boxes). Do not click on “I'm Done Editing” yet. Wait until the new purchase appears on the screen above a new row of blank boxes. You may now enter another purchase in the same fashion, or click on the “I'm Done Editing” button if you're finished.

Why is the price wrong on my Money Market fund?
The quote services have decided to report the yield of Money Market funds as if it were the fund's price, rather than always report a price of $1. Since My Portfolio doesn't know which funds are Money Market funds, it assumes the price is correct as reported.

Why can't I get a quote on my Canadian stock?
We presently handle only US stocks at www.fool.com and UK stocks at www.fool.co.uk. We do get a lot of requests to add the Canadian exchanges, and we're hoping to add them soon.


Why do I get such weird numbers in the summary?
Most likely you're not worrying about the amount of uninvested cash in your portfolio, but for some reason have Cash Tracking enabled. Now every time you buy a stock the purchase amount is deducted from Current Cash -- probably making it negative. If you aren't tracking your uninvested cash, you should disable Cash Tracking (click on “edit portfolio” and choose “Disable Cash Tracking” from the drop-down list next to “Actions:”).

I entered a “buy” today, and the daily change numbers are wrong. Why?
The daily change numbers show the change from yesterday's closing price to the latest available quote. On the day you made your purchase, yesterday's closing price is not particularly relevant, since it's from before you owned the stock. If you switch to one of the Long-Term views, you'll see the change since your purchase. Tomorrow, you can go back to the Short-Term views if you like, and they will make more sense to you.

Why do Trade Date and Ann % Ret show as N/A?
When you are viewing your portfolio in Consolidated view, there could be multiple trade dates, so the date shows as N/A (even if there is only one date). Similarly, there are many different ways to calculated annualized return when there's more than one transaction, so it shows as N/A in Consolidated as well. Just switch to Itemized (click on the button next to Itemized) to see these columns.

Why do I get the “Create Portfolio for (username)” page when I want to see my portfolio?
There's probably a problem with one of the servers. When it can't retrieve any of your portfolios, the server assumes you don't have any portfolios and therefore probably want to create one. Just wait a while and try it again. If you wait about 3.06 seconds, the server should be back to normal again (OK, it may take longer than that!).

Why do I get an error message every time I try to see my portfolio?
If this happens occasionally, it's probably a problem with one of the servers; just wait and try it again later. If it always happens, then it most likely is one of two things. 1.) One of the ticker symbols in your portfolio is invalid or has changed. Above the error message, you'll see a purple bar. Click on the “Modify/Add Stock” link in the purple bar. This will take you to the “edit” page, where you'll be able to see what ticker symbols are in your portfolio. Jot them down, then click on the Quotes & Data tab and try bringing up a quote on each ticker. If you find any invalid tickers, you can go back to Modify/Add Stock and change or delete it (see instructions for both below). 2.) Your have too many transactions in your portfolio. We have noticed these types of errors when you reach 75-100 transactions. See Instructions below for fixing.

Why are some ticker symbols green and others blue?
Actually, your browser is doing that. Links you haven't clicked on are blue, and links you have clicked on are green (your color scheme may vary). The ticker symbol is a link to a quote for that stock.

How secure is My Portfolio?
Your information stored in the My Portfolio area is secured by your user name and password. When you log into Fool.com, you are also logging into the My Portfolio area at the same time. If you are using a public computer, or share a computer with others, please be sure to click on the “Logout” button to prevent others from accessing your portfolio information.

Why did my Original Value change?
Original Value is really more like Current Cost. It's the sum of the costs of all your currently held stocks (including commissions). When you sell all of a purchase, it is no longer tracked in your portfolio. When you sell part of a purchase, the original cost of the shares sold (not including commission on the sale) is subtracted. If you have Cash Tracking enabled, the cash balance is also included in Original Value. We are currently working on historical tracking functionality for an upcoming release.


Creating and editing portfolios


How do I get started?
Click on “create portfolio” (or on “Create New” in the purple bar), and follow the instructions. First, you enter a name for your portfolio. Next, you enter a list of ticker symbols for your stocks or mutual funds. (Don't know the ticker? Click on the “Quotes & Data” tab, and find the “Lookup” heading.) For example, to track your Foolish Four portfolio which has Caterpillar, International Paper, JP Morgan, and 3M, you could type “Foolish Four” in the “Portfolio Name:” box and then type “CAT, IP, JPM, MMM” in the “Enter a list of Ticker symbols:” box.

Now, you have two choices. If you just want to follow the prices of these stocks, click on “That's All I Want to Know” and you're all set up (skip ahead now to “Can I enter more than one portfolio?” section).

The other option is to enter a little more information by clicking on “I Want to Tell You More”. Then you'll be able to track the value of your portfolio, compare your returns to the S&P 500 index, and much more. For the most accurate results, you'll want to look up the dates you bought your stocks, the number of shares, the price you paid, and the commissions so you can enter this information. If you don't have these details or don't want to enter it all, you can just enter the number of shares you own for each stock and leave everything else blank; the rest of the information will be filled in for you as if you bought the stocks today.

When you click on “I Want to Tell You More”, you'll see a row of blank boxes for each ticker you entered. Fill in the numbers, and change the drop-down “Buy” to “Short” if that's appropriate. If you need more rows (to enter multiple purchases of a stock, or to add some stocks you forgot to list), click on the “Go” button next to “Open 10 More Entry Rows:”. When you have all your data filled in, click on the “Submit” button. Another chance to edit the information will appear, and you can click on “I'm Done Editing” to finish.

Can I enter more than one portfolio?
Sure! You can have multiple portfolios, and we'll charge you the same price for each additional portfolio as we charge you for the first one ($0.00). Just repeat the steps above, starting by clicking on “create portfolio”. Once you've entered your portfolios, you can view them by selecting one in the “Port:” drop-down list (click the green “Go” button if the new selected portfolio doesn't automatically display).

How do I add, change, or delete stock transactions in a portfolio?
While you're viewing the portfolio, click on “edit portfolio” (if you're viewing the “Summary of All Portfolios”, click on the name of the portfolio you want to change first).

To add a new purchase, enter the ticker, trade date, quantity, price per share, and commission in the row of blank boxes below the list of stocks, and click the “Go” button while “Buy” is showing in the drop-down list. The new purchase will appear on the screen above a new row of blank boxes. (Note: if you don't see any blank boxes, and the word itemized is underlined in “view: consolidated | itemized”, click on “itemized” and the boxes will appear.) To enter a short sale, select “Short” from the drop-down list.

To sell a stock (or cover a short), choose “Sell” (or “Cover”) from the drop-down list on the same line as the stock you wish to sell. Enter the trade date, quantity, price per share, and commission, then click on “Submit”. If you have multiple purchases, you can sell shares starting with the ones purchased first by clicking on the word consolidated in “view: consolidated | itemized” before you choose “Sell”. If instead you wish to sell particular shares, begin by clicking on the word itemized in “view: consolidated | itemized” so you can see each purchase separately.

To change a transaction you're already entered, choose “Modify” or “Delete” from the drop-down list on the same line as the transaction you wish to change. If you don't see “Modify” in the drop-down list, click on the word itemized in “view: consolidated | itemized”. When using “Modify”, enter the changes in the boxes and click on “Submit”.

I typed the wrong ticker symbol. How do I change it?
While you're viewing your portfolio, click on “edit portfolio”. If the word consolidated is underlined in “view: consolidated | itemized”, click on it. Choose “Change Symbol” from the drop-down list on the same line as the stock you wish to change. Enter the new ticker symbol and click on “Submit”.


Why does the summary say Cash:Disabled?
How do I track my uninvested cash?

When you create a portfolio, a feature called Cash Tracking is initially disabled, since many people don't want to track their uninvested cash. If you'd like to keep track of how cash that's in your portfolio but not invested in stocks or funds yet affects your returns, you can enable the Cash Tracking feature. To turn on Cash Tracking, click on “edit portfolio”, and choose “Enable Cash Tracking” from the drop-down list next to “Actions:” (click “Go” if necessary).

A new line will appear that says “Current Cash:” and $0.00. If you have uninvested cash in your portfolio, choose “Modify” from the drop-down list (click “Go” if necessary). Fill in the amount of cash in the box next to “Modify To:” and click on “Submit”.

When cash tracking is enabled, your cash balance will automatically be updated as you buy or sell stocks, or modify existing transactions. For example, if you buy 10 shares at $25/share with an $8 commission, your cash balance will be reduced by $258.

What do I do when a stock splits?
While you're viewing your portfolio, click on “edit portfolio”. If the word consolidated is underlined in “view: consolidated | itemized”, click on it. Choose “Adjust for Split” from the drop-down list on the same line as the stock that's split. Enter the split information, and click on “Submit”.

What if a split results in a fractional share?
If you have 33 shares of a stock and it splits 3:2, you'll end up 49.5 shares. Most likely, you'll get cash instead of the fractional share, and end up with 49 shares and some cash, say $13.20 for example. To handle this in My Portfolio, go ahead and do the 3:2 split using the “Adjust For Split” function, which will result in 49.5 shares, then sell 0.5 shares for $26.40/share and $0 commission (a total of $13.20). Adjust the numbers for your particular circumstances, of course.

How do I enter cash dividends?
There isn't as much support for dividends as we'd like in the current version of My Portfolios. For now, if you're using Cash Tracking, simply add the dividend to your Current Cash value. If you are using a DRIP plan, you can enter the shares in at a cost of 0.00 (not “0”). This will provide a more accurate overall return.

If you are receiving your dividends in cash (and want them reflected in your overall return), then this post by PanrovianMonk is quite helpful:

http://boards.fool.com/Message.asp?id=1010013004551000


How do I enter a merger or spin-off?
Each merger or spin-off is a little different, so you'll need to gather some information about the ratio of new shares and such. The procedure for spin-offs is very well described in Dawnc's post 4134 http://boards.fool.com/Message.asp?id=1010013002011000 using the General Motors spin-off of Delphi as an example.

For mergers, you will need to use the “adjust for split” function to adjust the number of shares by the proper ratio. You should be able to get the ratio from the company's web site. Then, you will need to use the “change symbol” function to reflect the correct ticker in your portfolio.

Can I enter shorts?
Of course! If you're creating a new portfolio, be sure to click on “I Want to Tell You More”. To enter a short in an existing portfolio, click on “edit portfolio”. Either way, you'll see a row of empty boxes where you can enter the number of shares, original shorting price, and commission; then choose “Short” from the drop-down list under “Modifications”.

If you're interested in the mechanics, here's what happens: we'll add the cash from the short to your portfolio, but create a liability for the amount that you owe (the current price to rebuy your shares). As the price of the stock drops (that's why you shorted, after all) the liability will decrease, and your portfolio value will increase, since it'll cost you less to rebuy the shares. This change is reflected in the Long-Term Change column.

How do I track an index in my portfolio?
Use one of the following ticker symbols:
$INDU     Dow Jones Industrial Average
$TRAN Dow Jones Transportation Index
$UTIL Dow Jones Utilities Index
$IIX.X Inter@ctive Week Internet Index
$MMX Major Market Index
$NDX.X Nasdaq 100 Index
$COMPX Nasdaq Composite Index
$IUX Russell 2000 Stock Price Index
$RUT.X Russell 2000 Stock Price Index
$MID.X S&P 400 Midcap Index
$SPX.X S&P 500 Index
$SOX.X Semiconductor Sector Index
$WSX.X Wilshire Smallcap Index

For UK Portfolios:
ASX FTSE All Share
SMX FTSE Small Cap
UKX FTSE 100

Why doesn't the “Value” column total match the summary's “Current Value”?
This is because the “Value” column does not include uninvested cash, and the summary's “Current Value” does. If you are not intending to track your uninvested cash, click on “edit portfolio”, and choose “Disable Cash Tracking” from the drop-down list next to “Actions:” (click “Go” if necessary).


I entered too many transactions in my portfolio. How can I fix it?

First you will need to get to the “edit” screen. Click on the “Modify/Add Stock” link in the purple bar. This will take you to the “edit” page, where you'll be able to see what ticker symbols are in your portfolio. You may print this page by selecting the print option in your browser. Now you will need to delete several transactions. I recommend starting a portfolio with no more than 50 transactions to allow room for further entries. Once you have deleted the transactions click on the “I'm done editing” button. You can use the edit screen print out to create a new portfolio containing the deleted entries.


What types of investments are allowed?
We currently only support stocks traded on major US exchanges on www.fool.com. These include the NYSE, the NASDAQ, and AMEX. You can usually get a quote on OTC:BB stocks, but our support is limited. We do not support quotes on pink sheet stocks, options, foreign exchanges, bonds, or stocks trading on CUSIP numbers.

How do I rename a portfolio?
While you're viewing the portfolio, click on “edit portfolio”, and choose “Change Current Name” from the drop-down list labeled “Actions:”. Click on the “Go” button if necessary. Enter the new name in the “New Portfolio Name:” box and click on “Submit”.

How do I delete a portfolio?
While you're viewing the portfolio, click on “edit portfolio”, and choose “Delete Current Portfolio” from the drop-down list labeled “Actions:”. When the “Are you sure?” message appears, double check that you have the right portfolio, then click on the “Yes” button.


Viewing portfolios


How do I see a summary of all my portfolios?
In the yellow box near the top of your screen, you'll see drop-down lists labeled “Port:” and “View:”. To see a summary of your portfolios, choose “All Portfolios” from the “View:” list. If the summary of portfolios doesn't automatically display, click on the green “GO” button to the right.

To go back to viewing your portfolios individually, click on the name of one of your portfolios in the summary.

How do I get totals to display on the “All Portfolios” view?
At this time, we are not displaying totals on this page. You can use the “Download to spreadsheet” option to transfer this information into your spreadsheet program. Then use the spreadsheet functionality to calculate totals.

How do I select a different portfolio?
In the yellow box near the top of your screen, you'll see drop-down lists labeled “Port:” and “View:”. To select a portfolio, choose it from the “Port:” list. If the selected portfolio doesn't automatically display, click on the green “GO” button to the right.

How do I change between daily and long-term views?
In the yellow box near the top of your screen, you'll see drop-down lists labeled “Port:” and “View:”. Choose the view you want from the “View:” list. If the selected view doesn't automatically display, click on the green “GO” button to the right. You can choose daily or long-term views, with share prices either in fractions (like 42 1/16) or in decimals (like $42.06).

What's the difference between Consolidated and Itemized?
When you have multiple transactions for a particular stock, Itemized will show each transaction, whereas Consolidated will combine the transactions for each stock. For example, let's say your portfolio has 20 shares of Caterpillar at $47 each bought on 1/4/99, 25 more shares at $44 bought on 2/1/99, and 30 shares of International Paper at $42 bought on 1/4/99, each with an $8 commission.

In the Itemized view you might see:
Ticker  Trade Date  # Shares  Cost/Share  Cost
CAT 1/4/99 20 47.400 $948.00
CAT 2/1/99 25 44.320 $1,108.00
IP 1/4/99 30 42.267 $1,268.00
$3,324.00

And in the Consolidated view you'd see:
Ticker  Trade Date  # Shares  Cost/Share  Cost
CAT N/A 45 45.689 $2,056.00
IP N/A 30 42.267 $1,268.00
$3,324.00

Notice that in the consolidated view, the two purchases of Caterpillar have been totaled onto one line. The “trade date” shows as N/A since there might be multiple dates (as there is for Caterpillar).

To change between Itemized and Consolidated while viewing a portfolio, click the button next to “Itemized” or “Consolidated” (in the yellow area). If the display doesn't automatically update, click the green “GO” button.

To change between Itemized and Consolidated while editing a portfolio, click on the underlined word in “view: consolidated | itemized” near the top of the screen.

How do I change the order my stocks appear?
To change the sort order for the display, click on one of the underlined headings. For example, to sort the display by stock value, click on the heading “Value”. A small arrow pointing down will appear next to “Value”. This means the highest value stock appears first. Click on “Value” again, and the arrow changes to an upward pointing arrow and the lowest value stock appears first.

When you create your own view, you can select the order by choosing the item you wish to sort on in the drop-down list labeled “Choose Column to Sort On” and selecting a sort direction (you can do this while editing a view as well).

How do make this portfolio be the one that shows next time I log in?
Click on “set this view as default”. Choose the view and portfolio you want in the drop-down lists, then click on the “Do It!” button. If you want to add the URL to the favorites in your browser so you can easily return to your default view, click on “Home” (in the purple bar) and then click on the My Portfolio tab near the top of the screen (your default portfolio and view should appear) before telling your browser to “add to favorites”.

Can you explain the numbers in the Summary, like the %S&P500?
No. Well, OK, maybe I can. “Original Value” is the cost of all your stocks (including commissions) plus your uninvested cash (if Cash Tracking is enabled). “Current Value” is the current value of all your stocks based on the most recently available quote, plus your uninvested cash (again, if Cash Tracking is enabled). “Daily Change” is the difference between what your Current Value is using yesterday's closing prices and your actual Current Value. “Long-Term Change” is the difference between your Original Value and your Current Value. “Overall Return” is the same as Long-Term Change.

And last, but certainly not least, “% S&P 500” is the long-term change you would have gotten if you'd invested in the S&P 500 rather than whatever you really did invest in. This assumes that you invest the same amount of money in the S&P 500 as you did in your stocks or funds, and at the same dates. Since we don't know what time you bought your stocks, we just use the closing S&P 500 value from the previous day. Also, dividends from the S&P 500 stocks aren't included, but neither are the fees you'd pay if you invested in an index fund or SPDR (ticker SPY).

How can I see Year-To-Date (YTD) figures?
Create a new portfolio, and enter the stocks and funds you held as of the beginning of the year. Use the first day of the year as the date, and the values of the stocks and funds as of that date.

How do I print my portfolio?
While you're viewing your portfolio, just click on your browser's Print button. If your portfolio is too wide to fit on a page (or on your screen, for that matter) try changing to a smaller font (in Internet Explorer, click on View then Fonts, in Netscape click on View then Decrease Font) or, if possible, change your printer to “landscape” mode instead of “portrait” mode (in Internet Explorer or Netscape, click on File, Print, Properties).

If you've created a custom view that's too wide to print (or see on your screen), try creating two or three views, each of which shows part of the information you want to see. Then each view can fit on the screen or on the page.

Another possibility is to use a spreadsheet program, if you have one. While you're viewing your portfolio, click on “Download Custom View”. This will allow you to download a CSV file (comma separated values) either directly into your spreadsheet program (such as Excel) or saved to disk for future use. Once in your spreadsheet, you can use its formatting and printing functions.


Customizing views

You can display your portfolios any way you like by creating your own custom “view”. You can even create several different views, so you can see your portfolios with different information.


How do I create my own “view”?
Begin by clicking on “create view”. Then follow the easy steps. The first step is to click the button next to “Create New View (based on)” if it isn't marked already. Step two: from the drop-down list labeled “Select Basis for Your New View”, choose the view that seems most like the view you want to create (and if necessary, click on the green “GO” button).

The third step: pick a name for your view, and type it in the box labeled “View Name:”. (Make sure you don't pick one of the standard names, like “Long-Term (Fractions)” since they are reserved.) Next, from the drop-down list “Choose Column to Sort On:”, choose the order you want your stocks to appear. For example, choosing “Company Name” would cause Exxon, Microsoft, and Mobil to appear in that order, but choosing “Ticker Symbol” would cause them to appear as Mobil (MOB), Microsoft (MSFT), and then Exxon (XON). You can also choose the sort direction, consolidated or itemized view, and whether or not you want a summary by clicking the appropriate buttons.

The fourth step: choose up to 20 columns of data to be displayed. Initially, these drop-down lists will be filled-in based on the view you selected as the basis in step two. For each column, you can leave the item that's currently chosen, choose a new item from the drop-down list, or choose “-- Remove This Data Element --” to eliminate an existing column. When you've got all your columns just right, click on the “Create!” button to create your view.

How do I pick a view to see now?
In the yellow box near the top of your screen, you'll see drop-down lists labeled “Port:” and “View:”. Choose the view you want from the “View:” list. If the selected view doesn't automatically display, click on the green “GO” button to the right.

How do make this view be the one that shows next time I log in?
Click on “set this view as default”. Choose the view and portfolio you want in the drop-down lists, then click on the “Do It!” button. If you want to add the URL to the favorites in your browser so you can easily return to your default view, click on “Home” (in the purple bar) and then click on the My Portfolio tab near the top of the screen (your default portfolio and view should appear) before telling your browser to “add to favorites”.

How can I change a view I've created?
Begin by clicking on “edit view”. First, click the button next to “Edit Existing View”. Next, from the drop-down list labeled “Select View to Edit”, choose the view you wish to change. Make any desired changes, then click on the “Edit!” button. Remember, to eliminate an existing column choose “-- Remove This Data Element --”.

How can I delete a view I've created?
Begin by clicking on “edit view”. First, click the button next to “Delete Existing View”. Next, from the drop-down list labeled “Select View to Delete”, choose the view you wish to delete. Click on the “Delete!” button. Make sure you don't change your mind about deleting it now.

What are the -- Company Information -- columns?

Ticker Symbol (“Ticker”): The stock's ticker symbol. Clicking on the ticker symbol when viewing a portfolio brings up quote information on the stock.

Company Name (“Company”): The company's name.

Exchange: The exchange the stock trades on.

What are the -- Stock Information -- columns?

Time of Quote (“Time”): The time the quote data was obtained.

Date of Quote (“Date”): The date the quote data was obtained.

Price - Fractions and Price - Decimals (“Price”): The price the stock is trading at. Quotes are delayed (see “Time of Quote”).

High - Fractions and High - Decimals (“High”): The highest price the stock has traded at today. Before the market opens, and on days the market is closed, the high for the last day the market was open is shown.

Low - Fractions and Low - Decimals (“Low”): The lowest price the stock has traded at today. Before the market opens, and on days the market is closed, the low for the last day the market was open is shown.

Open - Fractions and Open - Decimals (“Open”): The price of the stock the last time the market opened.

Close - Fractions and Close - Decimals (“Close”): The previous closing price for the stock. This is the price of the stock at the market closing which occurred before the most recent market opening (see “Open”).

52-wk High - Fractions and 52-wk High Decimals (“52-wk High”): The highest price the stock has traded at in the last 52 weeks.

52-wk Low - Fractions and 52-wk Low Decimals (“52-wk Low”): The lowest price the stock has traded at in the last 52 weeks.

Price Change - Fractions and Price Change - Decimals (“Dly Pr Chg”): The difference between the delayed stock “Price” and the previous “Close”.

Price Change - Percent (“Dly % Pr Chg”): The percentage change from the previous “Close” to the delayed stock “Price”.

Daily Volume (“Dly Vol”): The number of shares traded so far today, or (if the market is closed) on the most recently completed day of trading.

Average Volume (“Avg Vol”): The average number of shares traded per day (averaged over the last month, as of the previous market close).

Dividend (“Div”): The annual dividend per share of stock. Note that if the company pays dividends quarterly, this number is the sum of the four dividends they pay during a year.

P/E: The stock price divided by the company's annual earnings per share.

Yield: The annual dividend divided by the stock price times 100.

Info Links (“Info”): Links to news, messages, estimates, charts, snapshot, financials, and sec filings for the stock.

Price Change Indicator (“+/-”): A green smiling, yellow neutral expression, or red frowning face depending on whether the “Price Change” was positive, zero, or negative.

Value Change Indicator (“+/-”): A green smiling, yellow neutral expression, or red frowning face depending on whether the “Long-Term Change in Value” was positive, zero, or negative.

What are the -- Portfolio Information -- columns?

Number of Shares (“# Shares”): The number of shares in the transaction.

Trade Date: The date of the transaction. Shows as “N/A” in Consolidated view.

Cost per Share - Fractions and Cost per Share - Decimals (“Cost/Share”): The average cost per share of the stock, including commissions.

Current Value (“Value”): The “Number of Shares” times the delayed stock “Price”.

Total Cost (“Cost”): The total cost of the stock, including commissions.

Daily Change in Value (“Dly $ Val Ch”): The difference between the “Current Value” and the value based on the previous close.

Long-Term Change in Value (“LT $ Val Ch”): The “Current Value” minus the “Total Cost”.

Daily Percentage Change in Value (“Dly % Val Ch”): The percentage change from the value as of the previous close to the “Current Value”.

Long-Term Pct Change in Value (“LT % Val Ch”): The percentage change from the “Total Cost” to the “Current Value”.

% S&P500: The percent change in the S&P 500 from the time you bought the stock to now. (Since we don't know what the S&P 500 was at the exact moment you bought your stock, we use the previous day's closing value.) When viewing in Consolidated (or in the summary), the percent change in the S&P is figured for each transaction, and then a combined percentage is calculated weighted by the “Total Cost” of each transaction.

Percentage of Portfolio (“% of Port”): The percentage that this stock's “Current Value” is of the portfolio's current value, including cash.

Annualized Percent Return (“Ann % Ret”): The annualized return from the “Total Cost” to the “Current Value”, also called Internal Rate of Return (or IRR). Shows as “N/A” in Consolidated view and for stocks you've held less than 15 days.

Cash in Portfolio (“Cash”): The amount of uninvested cash in the portfolio.

Portfolio Name (“Portfolio”): The name of the portfolio.

Why am I reading past the end of the FAQ?
There are some things in life that you just have to answer for yourself.

Updated 3/4/00
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