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Who has thoughts / experience on this? I can not find ANYTHING on this in pubmed. I can not find anything on image quality or images period on YouTube or Twitter. Alongside not completely being a US-based company makes me a tad uneasy here.

I also kinda wonder about image quality. Likewise, it frankly looks cheap. I wonder if it can do IV contrast studies, and what it's quality of said studies will be like. In some facilities, space is at a premium, so will it be placed in academic centers that are crunched for space?

As a parallel, ButterflyIQ recently created some buzz with a handheld-plug-into-your-phone-ultrasound probe under $2000 (super cheap compared to at least 35k for cart systems). And while I enjoy my butterflyIQ, I freely admit it does not provide the image quality of a mid to high end cart based ultrasound machine (ie, sonosite Xporte, Mindray TE7 or GE Venue). And early on the images were a good bit grainy, but it served a purpose for me in the ED or in critical care- in a code I care if the heart is beating or not, and can eyeball an ejection fraction without super quality images; the benefit of running to a code in the hospital with that in my pocket is quite high and I dont need great images. That is a very different game I'm playing than, say, a radiologist looking for breast cancer who likely needs higher quality images (or so I would imagine).

Now... why do I bring up ButterflyIQ as a parallel?
Because the ultrasound community tends to be a flexible, excitable, can-do, generally positive bunch, they were likely willing to deal with lesser quality images early on for the ease of access (having it in your pocket). I'm not certain radiologists would have the same mindset for diagnostic CT scans, nor am I certain they would be as forgiving and willing to continue to give it second and third and fourth chances...

Now... with that said, I'll post some numbers in the next post.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
units	cost		
	1000	8000000		
	
        annual scans
scans  @1k installed	$$ @ 20/scan	$$ @ 30/scan
@3/wk	156000	        3120000	        4680000
@5/wk	260000		5200000	        7800000
@10/wk	520000		10400000	15600000
@15/wk	780000		15600000	23400000
@25/wk	1300000		26000000	39000000
				
	@5k units installed	
@3/wk	780000		15600000	23400000
@5/wk	780000		15600000	23400000
@10/wk	780000		15600000	23400000
@15/wk	780000		15600000	23400000
@25/wk	780000		15600000	23400000
				
	@12k units installed		
@3/wk	1872000		37440000	56160000
@5/wk	3120000		62400000	93600000
@10/wk	6240000		124800000	187200000
@15/wk	9360000		187200000	280800000
@25/wk	15600000	312000000	468000000
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No. of Recommendations: 4
So, they want to get 1000 units installed by the end of 2021.
at 1 scan per day @ 20/scan, thats 3m/yr, but at 5/day @ $30/scan (their suggested cost), now we're at 39m.

at 12k units installed (they want 15k by 2024!)...
at 1 scan per day @$20/scan, thats 37m/yr, but at 5/day @ $30/scan, now we're at 468m.

I think 200m by 2024 might be achievable **IF** this works. I'm concerned it might be vaporware as their website is really short on details. I wonder if the radiology community sees that this might be giving them possibly alot of work upfront, but I suspect that Nanox has plans for AI reads long term and eventually will outsource alot of their scans as part of the package. I wouldnt be surprised if a small but vocal portion of radiologists will see this as a potential pathway to having some of their workload outsourced and fight against it / happily point out its shortcomings.

FWIW, $200m at 35x P/S is 7b and this is currently at 1.5b... but really expect slow sales and a bumpy ride early.
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Fuma: but I suspect that Nanox has plans for AI reads long term and eventually will outsource alot of their scans as part of the package.

NNOX is partnering with AI based CureMetrix.

This March 2020 article:
https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200324005386/en/Nan...

CureMetrix’s cmAssist™ software was able to correctly classify 70% of the biopsies as benign. As a result, CureMetrix’s AI CAD could potentially reduce unnecessary biopsies and therefore improve cost efficiencies.

Snip
With our aligned goals of increasing the accessibility and affordability of early-detection medical imaging systems worldwide, the integration of CureMetrix with Nanox technologies aims to increase patient access to mammography services and improve breast cancer survival rates across the globe,


Perhaps NNOX/CureMetrix will go the way of TDOC/LVGO and sign up with with the healthcare industry - insurers?

😷
ralph
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