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curious ----do any here travel to our National Parks?
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I've been to Denali, Kenai Fjords, and Wrangell–St. Elias this year. Growing up, I went to quite a few in California.
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Yep...Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Arches, Capitol Reef, Bryce, Zion, Yosemite, Death Valley, Grand Canyon, Mesa Verde, Acadia, Great Smokies, Shenandoah, Carlsbad Caverns, Mammoth Cave, Wind Cave, Badlands, Congaree.

It's all good. I've been to a few in Canada as well...Fundy (New Brunswick), Prince Edward Island, Kejimkujik (Nova Scoria), Cape Breton Highlands, Gros Morne (Newfoundland).
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curious ----do any here travel to our National Parks?


You bet, although I've only been to 19 of the 58. There are a bunch more I want to see!

Also enjoy National Forests, National Historical Sites, ...
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You bet, although I've only been to 19 of the 58.

One nice thing about Iceland is it's a small(ish) country with only four national parks. You could visit all four of them in one, two-week trip.
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They are GREAT (spectaculor) to visit over time and even cheaper if you buy the Senior Pass.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_national_parks_of_the_U...

With trips to Hawaii and Alaska (not ALL of those in Alaska) I've visited about 36 or these 58. Those in Canada are great too.

Hockeypop
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With trips to Hawaii and Alaska (not ALL of those in Alaska) I've visited about 36 or these 58. Those in Canada are great too.


Glacier and Banff are two of my favorites in Canada. I also went to a couple in Austria.

You're right about the senior pass. It's an incredible deal!

Grue
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curious ----do any here travel to our National Parks?

I prefer that type of vacation to the resort vacations. I love Yellowstone. Yosemite is really lovely also. One of my favorite vacations we did probably 10 years ago now...we drove and camped in various national parks for a week. I think we spent maybe two nights in hotels, mostly to get a shower and recharge devices. Spent a couple of nights in Great Basin, a couple more at Cedar Breaks, and a couple in the national forest just outside the Grand Canyon (north rim).

Our national parks are a treasure. (And, not to get too political, if you agree you should support the NPCA and urge your representatives NOT to cut the parks budget. There are various efforts to gut their funding.)
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Been to the following a few times: Yosemite, Joshua Tree, Bryce Canyon, Zion, Glacier, Crater Lake, Olympic, Haleakala. And to Mesa Verde and Grand Canyon once. In Canada, we've been to Banff, Jasper and Waterton several times. We keep talking about visiting Yellowstone and Acadia but it hasn't happened yet since our big trips have almost always been abroad.

--fleg
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With trips to Hawaii and Alaska (not ALL of those in Alaska) I've visited about 36 or these 58

Even though it is the size of Switzerland, not many folks make it to the Gates of the Arctic National Park in Alaska. You have to either fly in or hike to the park from the Dalton Highway (haul road).

It's on my bucket list of places to visit. It is one of the last truly remote and wild places on earth. No visitor center, no trails.
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We keep talking about visiting Yellowstone


I've been to Yellowstone several times. One of the big problems is the size of the crowds. One year, I went up there while I was at a conference at Jackson Hole in November. It was wonderful! There was almost no one there.

Grue
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I'm sure I'll forget some, and not all of these are officially "national parks", but...

Grand Canyon (several times -probably a dozen or more-, including one raft trip down the Colorado)
Walnut Canyon
Wupatki (at least three times)
Tuzigoot
Saguaro
Bryce (three times)
Zion (twice)
Cedar Breaks
Natural Bridges
Yosemite (twice)
Kings Canyon
Yellowstone (twice)
Grand Tetons (twice)
Manzanar
Pearl Harbor (World War II Valor in the Pacific) (twice)
Volcanoes (two or three times)
Captain Cook
Pu`uhonua o Honaunau (several times...good snorkeling nearby)
Kaloko-Honokohau
Pu`ukohola Heiau
Muir Woods
Sequoia (twice)
Great Basin
El Morro
Mesa Verde
Petrified Forest
Rainbow Bridge
Sunset Crater
Canyon de Chelly

In other countries:
Mt Pinatubo
Capas
Corregidor
Fort Santiago
Banff
Chichen Itza
Tulum
Toba
Xcaret
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One year, I went up there while I was at a conference at Jackson Hole in November. It was wonderful! There was almost no one there.

I was there in October once. Yeah, no one around. And the bugs are gone too (compare to summer...had to wash the windshield at least once a day). It was cold, but a wonderful trip. Some snow in places made for some great photography (IMO).

I'd really like to visit when the place is snowed-in and you need a snow cat to get around.

1poorguy
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I've been to Yellowstone several times. One of the big problems is the size of the crowds.

That's been a big reason for our hesitation. If we go, it'll have to be off-season, and then there's the problem of unpredictable weather.

--fleg
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I've been to Great Smokies, Grand Canyon, Congaree, Everglades, and Shenandoah. I really, really want to go to Acadia, within my trip to Maine to eat those lobsters, and to Prince Edward Island when traveling around Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Donna
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Natural Bridges is a National Monument, which Congaree Swamp once was until elevated to National Park status recently. Pearl Harbor is also a National Monument, which I visited while in Honolulu.

Donna
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So is Wupatki and some others. Some are also "national historical parks". A national parks pass gets you into all of them (in the US).

1poorlady has the "passport" (deluxe edition) and it has a lot of stamps! :-)

1poorguy
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Wow, hadn't looked 'em up before, but we've been to these US National Parks:

•Arches National Park, Utah
•Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado
•Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah
•Canyonlands National Park, Utah
•Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico
•Crater Lake National Park, Oregon
•Death Valley National Park, California and Nevada
•Glacier National Park, Montana
•Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
•Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
•Great Basin National Park, Nevada
•Haleakala National Park, Hawaii
•Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii
•Joshua Tree National Park, California
•Kings Canyon National Park, California
•Lassen Volcanic Park, California
•Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado
•Mount Rainier National Park, Washington
•North Cascades National Park, Washington
•Olympic National Park, Washington
•Redwood National Park, California
•Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado
•Saguaro National Park, Arizona
•Sequoia National Park, California
•Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
•Yosemite National Park, California
•Zion National Park, Utah

Add on Australia's Great barrier Reef, Canada's Banff, not sure if Victoria Island is or not..

Most in the US were camping, some repeats, Bryce, Zion, and of course Yosemite, where we try to get in at least twice a year, since clear back to the original Glacier Point Firefalls in the 50s... We hit Wheeler Peak, now Great Basin a few times, campground at 10,000+ feet, then hike up from there, took a few times before we acclimatized well enough to handle it, and we were much younger... Get the Pass, use it...

weco, wandering while we can...
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1poorguy, thanks for letting us know that the National Park pass will get us into the monuments as well.

Donna
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Don't forget the 102 National Monuments when you are making out your lists of places to go to.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_National_Monuments_of_t...

like

Canyone de Chelly

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canyon_de_Chelly_National_Monum...


Many of these are a lot more impressive than the national parks.
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Even though it is the size of Switzerland, not many folks make it to the Gates of the Arctic National Park in Alaska. You have to either fly in or hike to the park from the Dalton Highway (haul road).

It's on my bucket list of places to visit. It is one of the last truly remote and wild places on earth. No visitor center, no trails.


We've done the internal Alaska trip (Anchorage, Oscar, Valdez, Fairbanks, Danali and Fairbanks -- and places in between). The Juneau trip is fairly easy (most often by Cruise), but my friends tell me that the interior trip with required flights because of the lack of roads is REALLY spectacular. I agree, bucket list quality.

Somewhat like our topic while walking the dog this morning -- our trip to Hawaii and Molacki. Most Hawaiians have never visited it.

Hockeypop
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Canyone de Chelly

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canyon_de_Chelly_National_Monum......


Many of these are a lot more impressive than the national parks.




Canyon de Chelly is one of my favorites. It doesn't have the grand scale of the Grand Canyon, but some of the cliffs are more impressive, and the scenery is breathtaking.

BTW - if you go, the name is pronounce as "Canyon de Shay" by the Anglo locals and "Canyon de Sheh-yeh'" by the Navajos and many Spanish speakers. The original Indian name was transcribed to Spanish by the early settlers, and the double 'l' sound is pronounced as a 'y', as in tortilla.

Grue
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Watty56, thanks for the list. It appears, while I was growing up in VA (just a few blocks from Fort Monroe) that I visited quite a number of National Monuments: Of course, one was Fort Monroe (all the time), them Costillo de San Marcos, Castle Clinton, Fort Frederica, Fort Mantza, Fort McHenry (Yeah, Star Spangled Banner), Fort Pulaski, Fort Sumter (here in good old Charleston, SC), Governor's Island, Sonoran Desert (when first going to Phoenix), and the Statute of Liberty.

I'll never forget the upteenth time I viewed the Statute of Liberty with my ex-roommate, who is Japanese. When she saw it, she started crying. It was a very emotional moment for me. We take such things for granted, but those who are not citizens of our country, look at it far differently. Since we saw that together, I have been back several times with my former fiance. Now, I view the Statute far more emotionally than I did prior to the trip with Yoko.

Yoko has a great time at Fort Monroe also. There is a pier there at Old Point where the residents of the area fish and crab. (Daddy caught some seriously large Rock Bass there.) A lovely couple gave Yoko a fishing rod and a crab trap and she had a ball. We stayed at the BOQ at Fort Monroe and the chef there cooked Yoko's catch (she got both fish and crab). She was soooo pleased with herself. In fact, instead of just staying one day, we stayed two, so she could go out again, and I visited childhood friends in Phoebus, Hampton and Virginia Beach. I also took her to Fort McHenry after telling her the story of Francis Scott Key. In the same visit, we visited Governor's Island.

Then we headed South the following year and saw the forts near Savannah and St. Augustine.

My father was a serious ex-Marine and everytime we went traveling, we would visit the historical forts.

Donna
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I've been to Yellowstone several times. One of the big problems is the size of the crowds. One year, I went up there while I was at a conference at Jackson Hole in November. It was wonderful! There was almost no one there.

The crowds in Yellowstone in the summer are too much for me. But after Labor Day it is very manageable. But the best time to go to Yellowstone is the winter. In fact, you haven't gone to Yellowstone unless you've gone in the winter.
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We just had friends get back from Yellowstone and the Tetons a week ago and they reported that there were few crowds. I'm surprised, but that's the report.

Hockeypop
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School is starting up. In fact, 1poorkid has been in school for several weeks already (mid July). So I would expect the crowds to be thinning (especially compared to June).
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