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No. of Recommendations: 2
About a third of Americans over age 65 have diabetes; last month, the Endocrine Society unveiled new guidelines for their treatment.

Its recommendations included higher glucose and A1c targets for older people with diabetes, particularly those with several other chronic illnesses and cognitive impairment, or those having difficulty handling daily activities.

...

In recent years, a number of medical groups have advocated more moderate blood sugar targets for older patients, including the American Geriatrics Society, the American College of Physicians, the American Diabetes Association and the Veterans Affairs medical system.

Having the Endocrine Society also weigh in — its membership includes most endocrinologists treating patients in the United States — may help spread the word.

...

...the Endocrine Society guidelines and others recommend lower blood glucose levels and hemoglobin A1c ranges for older adults in good health, but higher targets for those with other illnesses and limited life expectancies. They likely won’t survive long enough to benefit from strict glycemic control; in the meantime, it could hurt them.

The Endocrine Society suggests an A1c from 7 to 7.5 percent for the healthiest older people, depending on whether they’re taking drugs that can cause hypoglycemia. The ranges increase to 7.5 to 8 percent for those with several chronic illnesses or with early dementia and other impairments, and to 8 to 8.5 percent for those in poor health.

The last category includes those with end-stage diseases or moderate to severe dementia, as well as nursing home residents.


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/12/health/elderly-diabetes-a...
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Well heck, that almost makes me feel healthy!

Fuskie
Who's doctor last week decided to increase his Jardiance dosage because his A1c wasn't coming down fast enough...

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No. of Recommendations: 0
Many folks who have lived with diabetes for a decade or more come to find that there
is a wide range of situations which impact what should be considered "normal" for
blood sugar levels and A1C values. Reacting to test results other than an extreme low
blood sugar really should be a considered step.

Howie52
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Reacting to test results other than an extreme low blood sugar really should be a considered step.

I've recently been seeing blogs and web sites discussing what a "normal" or "extreme low" blood sugar is for someone on a ketogenic diet, where glucose is no longer the primary fuel of the body.

Anecdotally, many are reporting feeling fine with blood sugar readings in the 30's and 40's. No sweats. No shakes. No dizziness.

When in ketosis, with limited carbohydrates, the primary source of glucose in the blood will be from the liver, via gluconeogenesis, produced as needed by the body. Simply because some functions of the body do require glucose as the fuel.

But the blood apparently no longer needs higher concentrations of it?
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"Anecdotally, many are reporting feeling fine with blood sugar readings in the 30's and 40's. No sweats. No shakes. No dizziness.

When in ketosis, with limited carbohydrates, the primary source of glucose in the blood will be from the liver, via gluconeogenesis, produced as needed by the body. Simply because some functions of the body do require glucose as the fuel.

But the blood apparently no longer needs higher concentrations of it?"

************************************************************************

Your in an area that I know nothing about. In my experience when my loved ones blood
sugars were in the 45 to 65 range, they were approaching diabetic coma levels. They
responded to questions - but were obviously not themselves - and not right.

As far as other diet approach folks, I would suggest talking to their own physicians
- but responding to a very low blood sugar is a critical area of diabetes. Waiting until
the event occurs to figure out an "action plan" is not a good approach in any event.

Howie52
My 2 cents.
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Your in an area I know nothing about

You seem to know enough to be suspicious of implausible statements on an Internet based forum. That's useful insight right there!
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