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Gleaned from TOB.

For the record, if I didn't need money, I wouldn't work. Therefore, I am at work to get paid. Not to have fun, not to make friends, and not to be motivated.

True, at times, there are other types of payment than just money. Benefits (such as health care coverage for me and the kids) and time off/flexible scheduling for this single mom come to mind.

All that said, I hate company outings. I hate team building exercises. I'd rather just slit my wrists. At 5pm, I leave. I leave it all. I go home, and I am with my family. I do not wish to see the people I work with for fun and games, I do not wish to make lasting bonds with them, I do not wish to join them in some "fun" game of riddle-me-roller-coaster riding at a local theme park. I hate roller coasters, they make me feel pukey, so a day spent at a theme park would involve me drinking myself silly from a flask of vodka and try on stupid hats in the Stupid Hat Store and eating kettle corn and really expensive crappy pizza sold to me by a pimply faced idiot.

The ONLY company outings I have enjoyed immensely were the movie and lunch trips our IT department at Big Corporation took during the work day. And in case the difference between that and a company wide beach outing aren't clear, let me spell them out: 80 nerds who already liked and understood each other went to a movie, and were given food, while we skipped work. Everyone up to speed on why this didn't suck?

Is this just an introvert thing? Personality quirk? Some people just seem to relish company events, love planning them and all, and I just don't get it. I don't. And yes, I have been told "Well, you can just skip the events." Suuuuuuuuuure you can. That won't affect my performance evaluations one bit. <eyeroll>

Talk amongst yourselves.

impolite
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{{For the record, if I didn't need money, I wouldn't work. Therefore, I am at work to get paid. Not to have fun, not to make friends, and not to be motivated.}}


I would say that if I did not need money, I would only work for myself and not anyone else. That is why I liked RJ's sugestion of giving each person $500. That would motivate me far more than going on some team building trip.



c
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You are just soooo perfect.


RJ
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I am totally with you on this!! Last 2 years, we could go on a company outing during the day to watch the TX Rangers. But we had to pay for our own parking/tickets!! So I (and others like me) stayed and worked.

And don't ask me to do company outings outside of my work hours. Bad enough I have to carry a stupid pager every 3 weeks.

Whew! I feel better now!

electrasmom (only works to get paid)
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I'm with you a job is a job is a job. They pay me to do it and I do it to the best of my ability. Then I go home and live my life. I have a friend that I made through work once many years ago but the rest of my, albeit small, circle of friends are from my life outside work.

It works well for employers to spin the family 'myth' on its employees - it seems to promote some sort of slavish devotion way beyond the reasonable call of duty.

As for socialising with work colleagues out of work? Pass me a knife. It needn't even be sharp.
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"team building" outside of work hours is stupid.

I like the movie thing (saw Serenity once...), although I did do a team building thing with my group (7 people) at the lake a few weeks ago and it was pretty fun. We had a pontoon boat, jet ski, lots of alcohol, etc. Still, this wouldn't have made sense for a lot of other groups, we're a pretty compatible bunch.

Since I'm in Austin a popular thing to do is to take your team to the Salt Lick and gorge on barbeque.
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My theory on work is that I want the most amount of effort. Beyond that, I don't care too much about the rest.

My boss and I had a conversation about that the other day. She wants to change Chewie's job title "to make her feel more appreciated and recognize the value she brings to the group." I suggested a raise would do more than a title change.

Since the money isn't there for a special raise, it will be a title change or nothing. I told boss not to worry about wasting energy on that for me. I told her my title could be "Shiftless No Talent Ass Spelunker" and it wouldn't bother me if it paid more. I'm all about the money.


RJ - whore, just not a cheap one
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My theory on work is that I want the most amount of effort.


Crap.

I want the most money for the least amount of effort.


RJ
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My reply to this directly relates to the thread on TOB on adult friendships.

I have many friends I have made as an adult. Most of these friendships begin at work. A few of them continue after we stop working together and some have lasted over 20 years.

I am an extrovert and I love socializing with work people after work as long as it is truly voluntary and we are doing something we all enjoy (usually involves adult beverages). However we frequently make a rule that we can not talk about work at these social events.

I believe this is different from the situations you are describing where attendance has an impact on your job situation.

As to the question on TOB about spending money on a company outing the OP seems adament that the group enjoys doing things together and the question is what fun activity they should spend the funds on.

Just my 2 cents ($9,999.98 short of a good time)

LKN4SUN
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I still work while not particularly needing the money but unless I was in dire straits, I'm not sure I could ever go back to a regular kind of job. I enjoy what I do but I enjoy it way more as a consultant. I have more control over most every thing. I really like the people I work with but that could be because I see them a few times a year - not every day.

Company events - when you work for public organizations, they don't happen very often. The only experience I really had with many was when I was in development at a Jesuit insitution. I drank more alcohol during that time than probably since grad school. Even with that, it was tough being "on" all the time.

Spousal company events - oh those rockin' software engineers. We made more of an effort when the kids were around because they were often picnics. The end of project blowout dinners were nice but they don't happen often. I leave it up to him to decide when we need to go to something.

rad
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I want the most money for the least amount of effort.

My feeling is that if I can get paid for doing something that is not work and might be fun, then that's a risk I'm willing to take.

What bugs me is if you ask for suggestions, don't turn around and say "I don't like that idea." Just nod & say "thanks."

And if you get a good idea from somebody else and it wins, share. It wasn't your idea, why should you get paid?

HM!
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Is this just an introvert thing? Personality quirk? Some people just seem to relish company events, love planning them and all, and I just don't get it. I don't. And yes, I have been told "Well, you can just skip the events." Suuuuuuuuuure you can. That won't affect my performance evaluations one bit. <eyeroll>

Greetings, impolite, if it is an introvert thing or a personality quirk, then I've got what you've got (yes, I am an introvert IRL). I like my colleagues; actually a lot, even, but I like them at work. And, no, I don't wish to spend extracurricular time with them as part of a company arrangement, since it's functionally STILL WORK. I want my non-work time to be mine and I DON'T want to have to make nicey-nicey and be all open and willing and collegial. Feh. I get so little time off as it is (though I am "part-time", I am basically on the hook from about 6:30am till about 6pm or thereabouts, and don't even ask me about being on call), I am very jealous of that time and don't wish to give even a minute of it over to some tiresome work function.

xraymd

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Is this just an introvert thing? Personality quirk? Some people just seem to relish company events, love planning them and all, and I just don't get it. I don't. And yes, I have been told "Well, you can just skip the events." Suuuuuuuuuure you can. That won't affect my performance evaluations one bit. <eyeroll>

I agree with ya every little bit. Especially that last part. Unfortunately, a lot of the time, NOT showing up for these "events" are considered CLM's (career-limiting-moves). If you DON'T just LOVE being with your co-workers as much as humanly possible, then you probably aren't the type that really wants to work with us anymore.

I skipped ONE Christmas party one year. Everyone treated me like a mutant after that. (Well, everyone treats me like a mutant, but that goes without saying.) A couple of co-workers told me later that managers WERE asking where I was and/or why I didn't come to the party. I basically didn't want to drive an hour and a half through a Wisconsin snowstorm to be at a party. I didn't encounter any repercussions after that, but I did attend all company functions after that and all was well. However, that left me paranoid, fearing that if I didn't attend every company event, that something bad would happen to me.


Blechh...


Duck
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Spousal company events

No way, not ever, no how. NO.

When we lived in the US I was referred to as the mythical wife as I never attended a single social event organised by the company.
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I don't hate team/company outings as much as some people do, but I think that management has a huge tendency to plan these outings to "motivate" their team without actually considering what motivates the team members.

On some teams I've been on, people love a free happy hour, even if it is after work. These are the more social teams where friendships frequently develop between team members, a lot of times because they teams are formed of entry-level people who are single and moved to KC from whereever they went to school.

Other teams I've been on prefer their team outings during the day.

My current team rarely does ANYTHING b/c nobody wants to do it after work, but they don't want the whole team to be away during work.

I have made many friendships at places I've worked - some are the type that will last after you leave a company or department and some are not - so I don't object to socializing with colleagues that I have common interests with.
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Interesting. I would've pegged you for an extrovert, based on some job-related threads I've seen you write it elsewhere. Live & learn.

The only company outing I've ever enjoyed is the one our department at Hewlett-Packard used to hold. HP owns (or at least, used to own) some acreage on a small freshwater lake in Cape Cod. The site had a big community lodge with a huge kitchen, a very large gathering room, and ping pong tables in the finished basement. The site also had 60-70 spartan cabins, with bath-houses sprinkled among them. As an employee you could request vacation weekends or weeks at these cabins. (Weren't guaranteed to get them; it was some kind of lottery system that weighted how often you'd been there already.) Lots of trees around the paths between the cabins. Docks on the lake. They even had free paddle-boats on the lake for a few years. Tennis courts next to the lodge. A bit of sandy beach to lounge on, or nearby trees to sit in the shade. No spouses or SOs or children allowed. Just us.

So once a summer our department would give us the choice: Spend the day at work, or drive over to the lake and spend the day having pot-luck BBQ and whatever else you wanted to do. Given that choice, I usually made the trip.

The place I work now, before they were bought and absorbed and thoroughly digested and now occupying an increasingly packed position in the lower colon of an extremely humongous corporation, would occasionally have similar outings. One year we had a day where you could stay here and work, or be bused to the Boston Science Museum. Once at the Museum, you could either hang with people or fade and enjoy it on your own. (I tended to sort of do a yo-yo thing; hang for a few minutes, split and connect up half an hour later.)

I don't mind casual outings like that. What I despise are after-hours affairs, and/or occasions with the dreaded team-building activities people. Trust me, if I hate the people I work with, making dorky structures with them out of duct tape and cardboard tubes isn't going to make me like them any better.

Unless I can actually make the structures out of them, maybe. Heh.

--FY
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Interesting. I would've pegged you for an extrovert, based on some job-related threads I've seen you write it elsewhere. Live & learn.

Oy. I am an introvert.

I am very social and friendly, but I TOTALLY have to "turn on" that portion of my personality. It drains me. A day at work, being helpful and friendly, drains me.

The job I love the most was: Courier. Just me, in my car, all day. if it paid more I'd still be doing it.

I always think that if left to my own devices, I would be a hermit - never emerging from my cave unless there was Chine(a)se food to be had or I needed to make a trip to the library.

impolite
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I always think that if left to my own devices, I would be a hermit - never emerging from my cave unless there was Chine(a)se food to be had or I needed to make a trip to the library.


!!!
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I am very social and friendly, but I TOTALLY have to "turn on" that portion of my personality. It drains me. A day at work, being helpful and friendly, drains me.

Huh. I guess it was the thread about ambitions, and your stated goals of being in charge of everything & everyone, that made me think you were an extrovert.

Or am I misattributing someone else's posts to you?

In any case, one of the things I like about being an engineer is that I can be successful without having to be in charge of others. I want as much control over my own destiny as possible, but controlling others involves more contact than I really want. One of many reasons I've always turned down offers to try the step into management.

--FY
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Huh. I guess it was the thread about ambitions, and your stated goals of being in charge of everything & everyone, that made me think you were an extrovert.

OCD: greedy beyotch.

I likes me some money. The money be at the top.

Conclusion: I should rule the world. From my cave.

impolite
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I am very social and friendly, but I TOTALLY have to "turn on" that portion of my personality. It drains me. A day at work, being helpful and friendly, drains me.

This is really funny thinking about our dinner. You saw me at the end of a day where I was around people and I feel the same way. Fortunately for me, the next day was spent entirely alone driving across the plains.

I have a work trip coming and I will be around people M-Th next week. I think that may be the longest stretch since I left regular employment - it'll be interesting to see how I do.

I always think that if left to my own devices, I would be a hermit - never emerging from my cave unless there was Chine(a)se food to be had or I needed to make a trip to the library.

This is kind of how I live these days.


rad
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Huh. I guess it was the thread about ambitions, and your stated goals of being in charge of everything & everyone, that made me think you were an extrovert.

<sigh> I should probably explain this, rather than be silly.

I do not attribute my worth or identity to work. I'd spit shine shoes if it paid a million dollars. Hell I'd boob-shine them for $100K, who am I kidding.

I'm in IT because I am good at it. I would be good at it even if I weren't being paid, and I'd tinker with computers somewhere else. In the back of the cave, with a spliced electrical connection and using the wireless broadcast of my non-security-inclinced cave neighbors, probably.

The big money in my niche is to be in charge. Going up in salary would require I spend more time at work, true, but I would still leave it at work. It is two separate realms for me. I am not cut out to bring work home, I am not cut out to answer help desk calls from India at 6am on a server that's not at my location, I am not able to care about it on my time. It's my time, and I have reading to do.

As such, I could NOT be a manager/exec at a company (like, GE) that required you live the job. Here, however, at a company that is family-owned (and where the owner himself is unreachable most times of the day, because of other interests), where the execs not only have lives but live them well and with their families, I could do it.

It would require having a spouse that would be willing to take up the slack at home, because I would be unable to come home and do a lot of housework, it would require a lot more money than I am getting now, but I could do it. And I would probably enjoy it immensely, then be on my way home at 5pm.

So, yeah, I hope that answers it.

impolite
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I'd spit shine shoes if it paid a million dollars. Hell I'd boob-shine them for $100K, who am I kidding.


Hey there fella.


RJ
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I likes me some money. The money be at the top.

Eh.

I mean, I know that's at least partially performance-artful.

But seriously: eh. I think there is such a thing as "enough money". I grew up watching my dad climb the corporate ladder. He started in manufacturing; finished an engineering degree by going to night school while working as a welder by day with small children and a small farm at home; became an engineer; took all the management courses; managed; was groomed to rise. Eventually he reached Vice President Of Something Or Other, and earned the perks: Free car, good salary, deferred salary, stock, whopping performance bonuses, golden parachute contract, yadda yadda.

And a funny thing happened by the time he reached that point. He realized he didn't care all that much. He didn't want to do what he saw that it took to rise higher. Frankly, I don't think he was either ruthless or dishonest enough. A merger happened, and he gleefully took early retirement.

Me, I wonder why it took him so damned long to reach "eh". ;-)

Not having money or security does suck. But dad worked his ever-living arse off to get what he got. I can't say he's ever been any happier than I am, who will probably never amass as much money, but just doesn't give a damn about it.

--FY (doesn't want to rule anything)
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So, yeah, I hope that answers it.

Yup, thanks.

Not that you owed me it. :)

--FY
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I am very social and friendly, but I TOTALLY have to "turn on" that portion of my personality. It drains me. A day at work, being helpful and friendly, drains me.

Huh. I guess it was the thread about ambitions, and your stated goals of being in charge of everything & everyone, that made me think you were an extrovert.
===================

introverts are not necessarily unsocial people--just as extroverts aren't necessarily social people.

How you get energy/recharge your batteries is how you determine innie or outie. Innies get it by being alone or in quiet places while outies get energy from being *with* other people. Innies like to be in charge too! The worst thing to be, I think, is a shy extrovert. You *need* to be around people and interacting with them, but it makes you break out in a sweat.

jmc (I think) had a great story about her parents: mom an introvert, dad an extrovert. Both come home Friday exhausted from work and want to "relax". Dad, being the extrovert, invites 10 people over after work; relax to him means being with other people. Mom, the introvert, freaks; relax to her means alone in the living room with a book and quiet.

One of my students recommended *The Introvert Advantage* which I ended up purchasing. For me, it wasn't ground breaking, but it did help me set up defenses about my need for time alone. In it they talk about social hangovers--too much time with other people, not enough time alone. The author also talked about ways of dealing with social situtations, which was helpful to me. I'm the person most likely to say something like "Oh, that color looks horrible on you!" when I first meet them, because I am so stressed out meeting someone new and someone I don't know. (Suave, I am not.) Once I know the person, I am much better. I'm also the person who stands in the corner with a beer observing every one because small talk is *so* unnatural to me. This social awkwardness is apparently an innie trait. Oddly enough, if I have a role --hostess, food server, distributor of small items, etc--I am really good at this stuff. It's when I am there as a guest that I am tongue-tied, awkward, and inappropriate.

The Fabulous Ms. S (hello KITTY! ) is an extrovert and has to do lots of social things for the job. I'm lucky that I can say to her "I can't do this." when it comes to social outings and she understands. I'm teaching a day class MTWR, and a night class MW this semester. By Thursday after class, I am almost shaking because I am so drained. It is just too much people time, scrunched together. Give me the regular semester any day, when I can recover on off days, by working from home.

b
apologies to those who knew this the innie/outie energy thing already.
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This is an interesting topic, and one that I think about often. When I was working at Large Telecommunications Company, I was rapidly climbing the ladder. I got to a point where I knew an advanced degree would take me even further up the ladder. So, I went out and earned an MBA. Exactly one month before walking across the stage and receiving my degree, my first daughter was born. A year before that, I had switched companies to a small startup where the organization is very flat.

So, it's always been in my mind to switch back to Corporate America and start reclimbing the ladder. But then I think, "Why?" Not only is the pay fantastic where I'm at, I also get to work from home. And see my three daughters throughout the day rather than at 6:30pm or 7:00pm after a long commute. Plus, there is always the possibility that we will go public or be bought by another company. So, where's the downside? Well, I received my MBA a whole five years ago now. And at this company I've had lead roles but I've primarily done software engineering and I often wonder if my degree will carry much weight since I haven't used much in practice.

At the end of the day, I always come to the conclusion that as long as I can amass enough money to retire and provide for my family, I'll be ok. And, my daughters will not remember how much I made or what level I rose to but rather how much I contributed as a parent in their lives. When I start to get the thoughts of, "But I can achieve so much more and I can make so much more" I always remind myself that all I ever wanted was for my dad to go out in the yard with me *JUST ONCE* and play some catch or go fishing.

Sorry for the rambling...but I think about this often and it's nice to see other people evaluating quality of life and quality of family time and how that affects professional decisions.

6'7
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The worst thing to be, I think, is a shy extrovert. You *need* to be around people and interacting with them, but it makes you break out in a sweat.

Vouch.
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The worst thing to be, I think, is a shy extrovert. You *need* to be around people and interacting with them, but it makes you break out in a sweat.

Vouch.


Crap. I'm actually a shy introvert who doesn't need to be around people, but sometimes has to be, and it makes me break out in a sweat.

Erik
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And if you get a good idea from somebody else and it wins, share. It wasn't your idea, why should you get paid?

I wasn't motivated to help chewie when she said she would keep the money and my only reward was bragging rights.

IF

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Oh, good grief. Add me to the group that hates team building exercises. Finding out why my smarmy condescending co-worker is that way doesn't help me deal with him calling me "Booa, my darling," as though I am twelve or lessen the urge to knee him in the groin when he does so.

Also, add to this list "rewards" that aren't, really. I mean, my old boss used to "treat" us to breakfast. Work starts at 7:30 AM, so that means meeting at 6:00 AM somewhere. I am not hungry at 6:00 AM, and I'm not feeling rewarded by the chance to get up at 5:00 AM to make the half-hour drive to the restaurant where we're eating. The cherry on this poop sundae? The reward breakfast is a) mandatory attendance, according to my boss, but b) not time I can charge for. Um, are those things not contradictory? Ah, but it's all the in the name of team-building.

Maybe it would have worked if we'd been united in our hatred of these breakfasts, but there was always at least one or two brown-nosers who were pathetically grateful for the free meal and kissed up to our boss and didn't understand why the rest of us were grumpy and bleary-eyed.

Blech, I *hate* team building. :-( I spend enough time with you people. Leave my free time unpolluted, please. If I like a co-worker enough to spend time with them, I will. We'll arrange it ourselves, and pick the activity, and have fun.


--Booa
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The reward breakfast is a) mandatory attendance, according to my boss,

Make me eat breakfast at 6AM, and I'll be vomiting it right back up in no time.

You shoulda tried that. Bet he would've reconsidered the "mandatory" bit.

-synchronicity, now thinking of two co-workers who did share breakfast at least once.
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The reward breakfast is a) mandatory attendance, according to my boss,

---------------------------------------------------------------

Make me eat breakfast at 6AM, and I'll be vomiting it right back up in no time.

You shoulda tried that. Bet he would've reconsidered the "mandatory" bit.

-synchronicity, now thinking of two co-workers who did share breakfast at least once.


And now that I think of it, it was kind of mandatory eating, as well. I tried to just order juice and hot tea, and he wouldn't have it, 'cause then he wasn't "treating" me to breakfast. Grrrr. I think he ordered me a breakfast skillet, which I picked at. :-( Because, yeah, fried potatoes and it still dark outside equals hurling in my book, too.


--Booa
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Sing it, sister.
Worked for large telecom for a period of time. Its team-building crapola was during the workday. Ok. Their time, their money, I'll sit and keep my mouth shut. (Well, except for that heinous TQM training. They were not amused when I offered, "Wouldn't it be the same thing if we all just used common sense?") Blech.

Worked for a tiny marketing company. Rah-rah, big thinkers, idiot financial-wise ("We can't be overdrawn, we still have checks" mentality). Team-building for those two bozos was renting some huge house on a lake and spending Friday morning to Sunday night writing on big pads out on the deck. Double, triple, quadruple blech. Team-building, my **s. They took 48 hours of our personal time without pay and acted like it was some great "adventure."

And regarding company parties. Blech, again. A company party means you are at work. It may not SEEM like you're at work because it's Saturday night or whenever, but you are. Your behavior is being noted. I attended every company party. Made the circuit of the room, glass of wine in hand, spoke to the pres. and v.p., waited until their backs were turned and exited.

Now I work from home and am perfectly happy with the job.

Gayle, not very social and apparently not a good "team player"

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Where I work, they have a big dress up ("Black Tie") party every year (although I work directly for my boss, he works as an agent of larger firm in their local office, and larger firm's local office holds the party thing). Fortunately, I've been able to dodge out because "Spouse works, and we have baby so I've got to stay home and watch her while spouse is at work". Since Dress Up Party is meant to go to the wee hours with plenty of drinking, baby sitter is difficult at best even if we wanted to go, and syncspouse would ahve to get out of work and so on.

I have yet to mention that there's no way in h*ll that they're getting me to rent a tux (with my own money, no less) to attend a "party" that I would be hard pressed to like even if it were my best friends, much less a bunch of people that I essentially share office space with (the only person who cares about my job performance is my boss, so impressing or ticking off the majority of these other people don't mean squat).

Of course, my best friends would never make me wear a tux, but that's a whole 'nuther story.

Heck, even at my old job, given the choice of, say, going to a local sporting event with the rest of them (in fancy seating) or just staying at home, I'd chose "stay at home" almost every time.

-synchronicity
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Is this just an introvert thing? Personality quirk?

I think it could be partly an introverted thing, but more likely it's just that you see work as just that - work. Socializing is altogether different. It's something you choose to do, with people you want to be around, rather than be "forced", so to speak, to do so with people who don't interest you much outside of the job. At least that's pretty much how it works for me.

Donna
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Oy. I am an introvert.

I am very social and friendly, but I TOTALLY have to "turn on" that portion of my personality. It drains me. A day at work, being helpful and friendly, drains me.


That is exactly like me. Whenever I say I'm an introvert people are like "but you're not shy". It's often mistaken for being shy. There was a time when I used to be painfully shy, but no longer. They are not the same thing. I can only be around people for so long before I get agitated.

I always think that if left to my own devices, I would be a hermit - never emerging from my cave unless there was Chine(a)se food to be had or I needed to make a trip to the library

BF is possibly more introverted than I, and we often refer to his house as the bat cave.

Donna
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BF is possibly more introverted than I, and we often refer to his house as the bat cave.

I wish I had a man cave to which I could retreat.

HM!
(would prefer a basement cave, not a garage cave)
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{{I wish I had a man cave to which I could retreat.}}


I have told my wife that I want to builld a bunker on our land when we purchase some. That is the ultimate man cave.


c
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I have told my wife that I want to builld a bunker on our land when we purchase some. That is the ultimate man cave.



I totally want one of those earth bunker home things. Bonus points if it used to be a missile silo. Those are so cool (literally) and I'll bet they make great TV rooms, what with the no natural light thing.


RJ - hermit-type
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Is this just an introvert thing?

No, because I am mostly introverted and I generally liked company events at my last company (current one doesn't have many).

Then again, I'd consider many of my co-workers friends. I keep in touch with several former co-workers even after leaving my old company more than a year ago. That was, however, a smallish start up with an atmosphere and a group of people that I doubt is replicated very often.

The vast majority of company events were things I consider fun anyway. Team building exercises like white water rafting? Sign me up. Retreat in Hawaii? I'm there. Stripped down one-day version of "The Game" requiring no sleep deprivation? [from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Game_(treasure_hunt) -- "The general structure of The Game is a series of puzzle challenges (often called "Clues"). Each challenge solves to the location where the next challenge can be found. During the course of The Game, a team will often travel all around a metropolitan area.] Yes! I love puzzles! Holiday party spent at a cooking class at Draeger's? Sounds like fun.

Not having a family (well, not having kids/spouse) makes a big difference too. I don't have to find a babysitter when work gets a group together to volunteer at Habitat. I just show up.

And yes, I have been told "Well, you can just skip the events." Suuuuuuuuuure you can. That won't affect my performance evaluations one bit.

It didn't for people at the old company who chose not to show up at company events. Then again, every company is different. In fact, I'd be much less likely to show up for anything my new company did. It's a larger, less personal company. I don't know as many people. While there are only a few co-workers now that I actively dislike (all of which are, fortunately, not in the office I work at), there are a greater number that I don't actively like.

For the record, if I didn't need money, I wouldn't work. Therefore, I am at work to get paid. Not to have fun, not to make friends, and not to be motivated.

If I didn't have bills to pay I would not do *this* job because I don't particularly like the work. But I would still keep in touch with a large number of my former co-workers (for me this means about 10 people I'd make sure to meet up with regularly and about twice as many that I'd be thrilled to see every once in a while). And I'd have some sort of job doing something, I'm just not sure what yet.
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I totally want one of those earth bunker home things. Bonus points if it used to be a missile silo. Those are so cool (literally) and I'll bet they make great TV rooms, what with the no natural light thing.

Don't know if it's still on the market but :
http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_3765315

rad
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Also, add to this list "rewards" that aren't, really. I mean, my old boss used to "treat" us to breakfast. Work starts at 7:30 AM, so that means meeting at 6:00 AM somewhere. I am not hungry at 6:00 AM, and I'm not feeling rewarded by the chance to get up at 5:00 AM to make the half-hour drive to the restaurant where we're eating. The cherry on this poop sundae? The reward breakfast is a) mandatory attendance, according to my boss, but b) not time I can charge for. Um, are those things not contradictory? Ah, but it's all the in the name of team-building.




Oh I remember going thru this too. I can top yours though. A few of our team were Moslem, and the 6:30 breakfast was during Ramadan, so these employees couldn't even eat the breakfast (fasting, you know).

Kind of insensitive.

Not to mention that they had sit through the sights and smells of the eggs and bacon everyone else was gobbling up.


That must have sucked.
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Hell I'd boob-shine them for $100K (/i)

What can I get for fifty bucks?

eag
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I think I'm the odd ball out here.

I enjoy the things. However, I also enjoy the people I work with. We'll go out to happy hour on occasion; we all go out whenever someone leaves the company, we've gone hiking on weekends together.

We're all programmers, most are introverts, but we've all gotten along socially pretty well.

I'll admit that we're not as cohesive a team these days, after we've lost half the team to a good economy and bad management practices, but we're still a lot different than the groups that seem to be described here.
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