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No. of Recommendations: 2
So early in the year to be running through jobs!!

Oh, I am going to hear about this.......:()!

"It's not working out." That is what greeted me when I went in today.

Well..

I regrouped and have a hair appointment at 3, then off 2 school.

Will have to find other work..at least I got through winter.

wild :)
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Oh no!

(((Wild)))

You'll find something else!

Soup
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No. of Recommendations: 15
I am truly disappointed for you, Wild, but you have to figure if you went into a rant after your bad night experience, you can not blame them. You had everything there - benefits, insurance, employee discount, plenty of hours and the BJM™. It kills me that you work so hard and still come up short. Can you still get bus hours?

Fuskie
Whose toungue is bleeding he is biting so hard...
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Wild,

I'm sorry to hear that HD job came to an end this way.

All I can say is, try to learn from this experience and use that
knowledge to help you in the future.

flowerschild
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No. of Recommendations: 5
It will be OK. I already have another interview at 10 AM tomorrow. I just need a nice little job 4 days a week till school is done. This time there will be NO miscommunication of what I am able to do.

I just could not work all they wanted me to, and they were unhappy with me changing my hours. I thought it might be me ranting, but that was not brought up. Hell, if I knew I was out of there, I would have ducked out Tuesday and not suffered so long .

The job does not come first. School does. I have already paid for the 27 dollar marketing book out of my own pocket, and still have a few paychecks due me.

All will be well.. and this is a great break to finish my cleaning! :)

wild :)
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No. of Recommendations: 46
...I just could not work all they wanted me to, and they were unhappy with me changing my hours. I thought it might be me ranting, but that was not brought up...

Well, you could go back and give them a 2nd chance!
"I thought about what you said, and I'm sorry for the miscommunication. I understood you would work around my school schedule, and I guess I thought that meant you had more flexibility than you really did. So can we talk? I'll try to work with you here on the scheduling thing. I've put in some time for training that I'd hate to see go to waste, and you all are very busy and need help, so I think we can work something out."

Of course, it may very well have been your ranting (you didn't really say "never never never" to them, did you? that was just venting on the boards, wasn't it?), and they're just using scheduling as an excuse. But at this point you have nothing to lose by doing a bit of groveling. So give it a shot.

Work nights if need be. You do need that $50.

...The job does not come first. School does...

Why? You're going to school so you can get a job, right? You already had a job. If you were 16 years old, school would come first. At this time of your life, a job comes first.

Plus, if you think you'll handle a job better with some schooling under your belt, you're mistaken. Your difficulties at work are not due to lack of education.

Apologies for my bad manners in criticizing a hostess on her own board, but boy I wish I could reach through the modem and smack you upside the head.

Mary
(not as good at tongue-biting as Fuskie)
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No. of Recommendations: 6
No need to say "Sorry" or use OT on my board!

At the risk of boring my old time faithful... we will go through this again.

The very first job I held down out of high school was 6 days a week for 4 1/2 years back in the early 1970's. Other than 2 years of no Social Security earnings , I have had many jobs since then. I have lots of work experience.

As I have got older, my patience has grown shorter, and my body has some aches and pains.

However.. I had a clerk job. That's the FM word. His ex had clerk type jobs. Thru~out the marriage now.. she NEVER FINISHED HER EDUCATION!!! So now she is my age.. or a bit older.. and still makes clerk wages. OK.

Let us take FNCCW .. she worked all her life. She has no education. She now does not make 10 dollars an hour. Again, no education.



I wanted something close by for the winter, and I found it. They got their money's worth of training out of me. I was a good worker.

I go to school to have a real job. That is my priority.

A Real Job!

A profession.

Then I can go be nice to cashiers. All this training is good for me. I hope I did not act aloof, for the job was pleasant, though a bit dirty. Ugh!

I think I can cover the 250 dollars a week in short order. That's all I was making.. I was just a little less poor. Unbowed by this bit of misfortune, I bought some nice fresh flowers from WMT, and my newly styled hair looks terrific. I had a fine afternoon after all!

Now what does concern me is not this little minor job, but the reaction from my favorite man when I tell him I am not there.

THAT I dread. Thank G-d though, I did not walk out. I can spin this, I hope. :)

wild :)
may have to work 2 jobs now! Grrrrr!
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No. of Recommendations: 4
...The job does not come first. School does...

Why? You're going to school so you can get a job, right? You already had a job. If you were 16 years old, school would come first. At this time of your life, a job comes first.

Maybe Wild wants a career rather than a job. The career path Wild says she wants requires education.

Plus, if you think you'll handle a job better with some schooling under your belt, you're mistaken. Your difficulties at work are not due to lack of education.

Obviously the appropriate education for the career she wants won't eliminate all issues related to job satisfaction. Most jobs have strong & weak points. And you're right that her difficulties at HD weren't due to a lack of education.

jmc
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No. of Recommendations: 56
I go to school to have a real job. That is my priority.

-------------------------------------

I hate to tell you this but if you don't work, you have no money, and if you have no money, you can't pay the bills... and if you can't pay the bills then you can't have a roof over your head... it only gets worse from there.

You speak as if education is going to magically turn you into a better person, a nicer person... why wait for that?

You should be supplementing your life and work with school to better yourself, because where you are sitting, your mannerisms are not going to suddenly change with a degree in hand.

You have excellent benefits at HD. Don't screw that up because of a single bad night. Future employers don't just look at your education, they also look at the string of jobs you have had. You are a high risk employee if you cannot hold down a job and the way things are going, you are heading straight down that road. It won't matter if you get an education or not because you will not have shown the track record needed by higher paying companies to want them to even consider you for employment. You are going to be a deadbeat as far as they are concerned.

I totally understand your need and desire for an education. It does lift you up in this world but it is part of a complete and total package of who you are. Work counts. Your employment record counts. The fact that you haven't been thrown in jail counts. But you cannot put the cart in front of the horse by expecting that things will fall into place with an education. You must take baby steps along the way to make sure that you get from point A to point B.

Wild, I work full time and go to school full time and I have to say that the combination totally sucks. But I also know that I have an excellent employment record and I have supplemented my future with education, one class at a time. I'd love to rant and rave about idiot customers, but I know that I need to maintain and stay the course for my personal future in having a better job once I leave my current one. I guess I will say that being fired would never happen being that I am in the military but personal discipline works in my favor for ratings on the job that maybe a future employer is going to have their eyeballs on. I need the consistency of good work combined with discipline to get to where I want to be.

I concur with the prior poster who said you better get your butt back to HD and grovel back for your job. This is by far the best one ever that gives you the opportunity to go to school and pay for part of it. Don't look a gift horse in the mouth fer crissakes. This is an opportunity some people would kill for. Why the hell fight the education expenses alone or just with financial aid when you have a perfectly wonderful benefactor in HD?

You're killing us here, Wild... help yourself out and get thee back to HD! You deserve better but you have to have a hand in making it better utilizing every resource thrown your way. Opportunities don't just drop on your doorstep... but when they do, don't dump all over them. You may never get this chance again.


CaveGirl
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No. of Recommendations: 1
You're killing us here, Wild... help yourself out and get thee back to HD! You deserve better but you have to have a hand in making it better utilizing every resource thrown your way. Opportunities don't just drop on your doorstep... but when they do, don't dump all over them. You may never get this chance again.


I totally agree with you CaveGirl.
Don't be so quick to give up Wild.

flowerschild
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No. of Recommendations: 6
...I go to school to have a real job. That is my priority.
A Real Job!
A profession...


Since I was a middle-aged woman in college for that exact reason, I can totally identify with that.

Other potential reasons, FWIW:
* Greater knowledge and accomplishment, and the resultant increased sense of self-worth. My favorite philosophy professor told the story of having a telephone repairman come to her home, and recognizing him as one of her top students. He said, "I'm not just a telephone repairman, I'm an ENLIGHTENED telephone repairman!"
* Increased respect from others. With a strong enough sense of self-worth, this is not as important, but we are social creatures and I think we all do need this to some extent. However, it gets tricky. Even among doctors, some look down on others depending on their specialties. No matter where you are on whatever ladder you choose (income, occupation, education, religion, manners, looks, housing, ....) there will always be people above and below you.

Whatever reasons you have for pursuing education, and I do support the concept, the bottom line is that before you can go to school, you must have food on the table.

That is why I said a job is your first priority.
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No. of Recommendations: 13
<I go to school to have a real job. That is my priority. >

Both my sister and her husband have less college under their belts than you do. Both have very good jobs with benefits. Both entered the workfield at the low end of the totem pole. They got to where they are now by STAYING with their respective companies and showing their aptitude and doing what they needed to do to get ahead. My sister has since moved on to another company with an increase of several thousand dollars. Why? Because they saw how far she had come at the previous job in 6 yrs and her stability.


Sorry to be so harsh but as someone else on the board pointed out, if you think HD customers are bad, wait until you have to deal with parents after your start teaching.

electrasmom
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Sorry to be so harsh but as someone else on the board pointed out, if you think HD customers are bad, wait until you have to deal with parents after your start teaching.

That's why I like teaching undergraduates. Though if you think parents are bad, undergrads aren't always a bed of roses. ;)

But, specifically, teachers dealing w/ parents is getting a bad rap. Why? My dad was a teacher for his entire career & preferred it when parents got involved in their children's education. (Though, heaven forfend, they should miss one of my student-teacher conferences..... IOW, one can become too involved for a child's taste.) :) Of course parent-teacher conference days were always exhausting for him.

jmc, from a long line of teachers
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<But, specifically, teachers dealing w/ parents is getting a bad rap.>

Oh my!!! I certainly was not implying that this is always bad. My sister is in constant contace with DN teacher. Because she cares. I was referencing the parent who cranks at the teacher that their beloved Bratley would never misbehave, etc.

Sorry if I gave the wrong impression!!

electrasmom (who has major respect for anyone who goes into the teaching profession)
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Oh my!!! I certainly was not implying that this is always bad. My sister is in constant contace with DN teacher. Because she cares. I was referencing the parent who cranks at the teacher that their beloved Bratley would never misbehave, etc.

Ahhhh, so you're thinking of high-maintenance parents and/or parents w/ high-maintenance kids. There's certainly high-maintenance people in any situation -- luckily they're usually few & far between. Also defensive people.

electrasmom (who has major respect for anyone who goes into the teaching profession)

Don't worry, I didn't get the impression that you disrespect those in the teaching profession.

jmc
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No. of Recommendations: 9
Thank you, Cavegirl, I can unclench my teeth now. You described from practical experience all the lessons I wanted our student to learn. I just want to add that Wild is now 52. At the rate she can afford classes it will still be a few years before she can earn a degree. Let's say Wild has her degree by the time she is 55. I can understand someone starting over in their 40s, but at an age when most workers are being pushed and prodded toward retirement in favor of younger and cheaper workers, the opportunities for embarking on a new, if not shortlived, career are few. It does not matter whether there is a teacher shortage. The realities are that our culture does not value seniors in the work force. In fact, except as a voting lobby, our society does not value seniors much at all.

I hope that I am wrong. I hope that Wild can quickly get her degree, launch a career some 30 years after most people, and spend 10+ glorious years teaching before being forced to retire at 67. Shoot, I hope Wild is healthy enough to continue teaching for at least 10 years. But I am a realist, and I would much rather Wild work at Home Depot 40hrs a week and save up a little money over the next 10-15 years to retire on. After all, she is only 52, and according to President Bush, her Social Security could be gone in 60 seconds.

Fuskie
Who has a busy weekend planned, which includes arts and crafts, monkey suits, and a Superbowl Commercial Party...
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No. of Recommendations: 14
Fuskie, Cave, et al., teeth clenching here, as well. The biggest issue as to Wild's age that concerns me is not actually her age. It's the job-hopping and lack of employment stability! I think if she would (PLEASE) stay at HD while completing her degree it would (1.) provide a steady, reliable income with benefits and (2.) be with a reputable company which, frankly, look better on a resume than "Joe's Split Pea Soup Shop"!

Wild, have you put together a resume lately? Would you hire yourself, looking at your resume, experiences, and stability? It won't only take a degree to get a teacher's job (or any other, for that matter). It takes the other tangible and intangibles that make you competitive to get one. Learn what those are, and start busting it to get those!

Wild, we all want you to not only succeed; but to not self-destruct, in the process. Start visualizing yourself in the job you wish to have, and the life you wish to lead. What, and whom, do you see holding you back from that success? Don't let psuedo-friends (FM, for one) suck your energy that you need to hit your goals for the future. If the friends you currently have don't respect and encourage your desire to grow in education, lifestyle, and in success; then drop them. People can be resentful and afraid when they see their peers strive for, and ultimately achieve, that which they themselves won't work for. What do you really want? And, why are you getting in your own way, in achieving that?

Only you can, and will answer these questions. God Bless you. Good Luck and work hard!

Fly2Retire
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No. of Recommendations: 10


All I know is that if I were in the same shoes, I'd be reeling with abject terror.

To get to that age and have less than nothing, knowing the realities of life and the job market.

I'd be worried about ending up with some dreaded ailment, living in one of those state run hospitals or shelters, being ignored by nasty state workers who sit around watching the clock while I sit in my own urine. Even worse, I read in the papers here about poverty stricken oldsters living out of welfare motels, getting beaten up and robbed by the drug dealers who haunt those kinds of places.

The imagined pain of ending up as an old person living in abject poverty is greater to me than the pain of getting up, suiting up and showing up every day at a job that's not always fun and often stressful.

Maybe you get to a certain point in life where you can't change your thought patterns and so you continue down the same path, practicing the same behaviors, but expecting a different outcome?

Unfortunately, that never seems to get anybody anywhere.

MG







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