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THE reporting out of Baghdad continues to be hysterical and dishonest. There is no civil war in the streets. None. Period.

Terrorism, yes. Civil war, no. Clear enough?

Yesterday, I crisscrossed Baghdad, visiting communities on both banks of the Tigris and logging at least 25 miles on the streets. With the weekend curfew lifted, I saw traffic jams, booming business — and everyday life in abundance.

Yes, there were bombings yesterday. The terrorists won't give up on their dream of sectional strife, and know they can count on allies in the media as long as they keep the images of carnage coming. They'll keep on bombing. But Baghdad isn't London during the Blitz, and certainly not New York on 9/11.

It's more like a city suffering a minor, but deadly epidemic...


Emphasis added.

http://www.nypost.com/postopinion/opedcolumnists/64407.htm

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No. of Recommendations: 5
<Yesterday, I crisscrossed Baghdad, visiting communities on both banks of the Tigris and logging at least 25 miles on the streets. With the weekend curfew lifted, I saw traffic jams, booming business — and everyday life in abundance.>

Does this sound like anybody elses' version of everyday life?


"BAGHDAD, Feb. 28 -- Salim Rashid, 34, a Shiite laborer in an overwhelmingly Sunni Arab village 20 miles north of Baghdad, received his eviction notice Friday from a man at the door with a rocket launcher.

"It's 6 p.m.," Rashid recounted the masked man saying then, as retaliatory violence between Shiites and Sunnis exploded across wide swaths of central Iraq. "We want you out of here by 8 p.m. tomorrow. If we find you here, we will kill you."

Walking, hitchhiking and hiring cars, the Rashid clan and many of the 25 other families evicted from the town of Mishada had made their way by Tuesday to a youth center in Baghdad's heavily Shiite neighborhood of Shoula. There, other people forced from their homes were already sharing space on donated mattresses."

(quoted material from today's newswire)


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No. of Recommendations: 2
THE reporting out of Baghdad continues to be hysterical and dishonest. There is no civil war in the streets. None. Period.

I'd be curious to see the reporting that claimed that there was "civil war in the streets." Most of what I observed consistently noted that sectarian violence was on the upsurge, and that Iraq faced the prospect of civil war - but not that civil war had broken out.

That observation - that Iraq was perilously close to civil war - was shared by U.S. Ambassador Zalmay Khalizad, who observed that "I think the country came to the brink of civil war."

Would the Post claim that his his assessment is "hysterical and dishonest"? If so, perhaps the Administration should re-evaluate its choice for that important position.

Albaby
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Nope. Nothing to it:

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/01/international/01cnd-iraq.html?hp&ex=1141275600&en=5bf8ffaeb8e7841d&ei=5094&partner=homepage

Geesh.

And now I hear on Rachel Maddow's Air America show that Tucker Carlson is claiming that the "war" failed because Bush is too "liberal."

Tell me again how the right has not studied all the negative lessons of George Orwell.

Ken
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No. of Recommendations: 3
'It's more like a city suffering a minor, but deadly epidemic...

It is just incredible reading what you write on this subject. But it is not surprising because your motives for denying reality are transparent. You have bayed long and loud on this board about Iraq and every single word you have uttered on this subject has been comically inaccurate. Five mintues ago, you were boldly stating that 'attacks have stopped,' that life in Iraq was 'pretty normal.' That was on the eve of the deadliest attack since the invasion.

As this policy headed straight off the edge of a cliff, you started to ferret around for someone else to blame. And guess who you came up with? Clinton! But, of course! His admin had created an atmosphere of such irresitible invasion fever that the party running the country had no other choice than to helplessly succumb to it. It really wasn't their fault at all! The other culprits, according to you, are the media. You would lay the blame for this at the feet of absolutely anyone other than the people responsible for it, wouldn't you Cynic? You would blame Britney Spears, Christina Aguilera and the whole Mickey Mouse Club if you thought you could. You pretend to be right wing. Do remind us all again about that integral right wing philosphical commitment to personal responsiblilty. Now you're claiming that what is happening in Iraq is 'minor?' That's strange. Because there isn't a single military or political leader anywhere on Planet Earth who would agree with you. Haven't you noticed the quivering hands and the rictus smiles on the faces of the clowns who sold this idea??

'A US military intelligence chief has warned that further violence could have a "significant impact" on the country. "We're in a very tenuous situation right now I believe," Lieut Gen Michael Myers told the Senate Armed Services Committee in Washington' BBC

At least 26 people killed today in a fresh wave of bombings. Iraq has turned into Yugoslavia. And you reckon that the people engaged in the carnage are only play acting for their buddies in the liberal media? Get a freaking clue.

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It's more like a city suffering a minor, but deadly epidemic...


That makes everything just perfect. It should be everyone's goal to be infected with a minor but deadly disease.

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Things are going so well in iraqmire it is no longer a question of when we get the troops out, it is a question of how do we get them out safely?
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FA'd. There's no reason to post anything like that.
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