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http://www.businessinsider.com/early-retiree-shares-10-thing...

This article really makes me hate my job this Monday PM.

fredinseoul
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There's something about that article that feels fake and contrived. I don't know why, probably the tone of the writing.
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There's something about that article that feels fake and contrived. I don't know why, probably the tone of the writing. -- Volucris

Sounds fine to me!

I have a lot in common with this guy apparently, including my plan to climb some 14ers (14er.com) in Colorado this August. I retired a bit later than him, at 57, but it all sounds pretty familiar to me. Except I wasn't hassled by recruiters. Different situations, I guess.

Rob
He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.
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including my plan to climb some 14ers (14er.com) in Colorado this August

Which ones?

It does sound fine. I don't like his writing style.
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I've got the "Decalibron" in mind:

https://www.14ers.com/route.php?route=bros6&peak=Mt.+Dem...

...a four-time summiting. Not sure if I can go for the whole thing, but we'll see!

Have you gone to any of these 14ers?

Rob
He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.
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Have you gone to any of these 14ers?

I've climbed 33 of them. I climbed Lincoln, Bross, and Democrat when I was 20. It was much much easier then. This summer I'm going to try Kit Carson and Capital Peak. Two very hard ones. I saved the hard ones for when I was in my 50's. Pretty smart. Last summer we tried Crestone Needle and got snowed out.
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Although I first went to Colorado in my early 20s, I never gave much thought to climbing any of the 14ers until recently. So, I'll be doing my 1st this year at the age of 64. And overweight. But I'm losing weight and getting into better shape.

My wife plans to come with me, but I have doubts that will work out well. She tends to have issues hiking along even at relatively low altitudes like 10,000 feet or so. If necessary, she'll be able to go back down and relax while waiting for me. And she's fine with that.

I expect it to be difficult. And while I'm working to get into better shape, I'm mostly counting on my persistence.... and trying to remember that I don't have to try to maintain my usual walking pace.

Do you have any advice?

Rob
He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.
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Start early. You should be down off all of the peaks by 1:00. Afternoon T-storms above timberline are spectacular, and deadly. Keep an eye on the weather when climbing

Layers - Bring enough clothes to survive a blizzard. I have been whited out in blizzards at 14K in July. I started climbing at 4:30 and didn't get down until 9 that night. That was on Oxford and Belford. Rain coats and pants are far better than a poncho.

Don't wear cotton - cotton kills.

Boots - break 'em in.

Get some collapsible hiking poles. Pretty handy coming down and help to save your knees.

Sun screen, sun hat.

Maybe climb Sherman first - it's a one off. It will give you a feel for it. Or Elbert, it's the highest and about as difficult as Bross.

Climb on a weekday - 14ers get loved to death on the weekend

All that being said, I've seen people at 14K wearing nothing but flip-flops, shorts and a t-shirt, and only carrying a small water bottle, and they almost always seem to survive just fine.

Read "Colorado Fourteener Disasters" It's pretty interesting.
http://www.denverpost.com/2005/12/03/missing-hikers-trail-li...

V
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All that being said, I've seen people at 14K wearing nothing but flip-flops, shorts and a t-shirt, and only carrying a small water bottle, and they almost always seem to survive just fine.


It's that "almost" you need to keep an eye on, and prepare properly.
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Thanks!

Yep, I've read the trip reports about weather. And sun protection. Got a wide brim hat... with strap (wind).

I've got a small shopping list for clothes, including North Face Venture 2 rain jacket. Need to sort out pants and the various layers underneath.

Already have hiking poles. And we plan to hike on the weekdays for the reason you point out.

Based on some of the reports, I plan to buy a small anemometer in case of "interesting" weather, just so I can talk about it. :) Bought a small tripod that holds my iPhone, just in case I have no companion on the summits.

I've also read a lot of back and forth on the 14er site on hiking shoes vs boots. Seems like an even split, with some strong opinions each way. Breaking in is, of course, a must. Need to shop for that soon. Just undecided....

I'll read about Sherman and Elbert again. And check out your disaster link soon. By the way, I read recently about a guy hiking in the winter, slid down the mountain, broke his hip and dislocated his elbow... and walked till he could flag down some help after building a snow shelter. Darn tough guy!

Rob
He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.
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Never heard of the CORSAR card. That's a REALLY good deal!

Rob
He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.
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I like boots for the ankle protection. But to each his own.

I think the North Face Millerton jacket is a bit better. Tomato tomahto
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While I'm at The North Face, I'll check out the Millerton too.

Rob
He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.
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