Skip to main content
No. of Recommendations: 0

Obviously it's entirely up to you, and what you want.

Just from the bit you've described I would already be saying "screw it, I'm done".

Maybe if it was a dream job that I might want to do for a few more years. Like Goddard Space Flight Center. And even then, given the hassles you've described, I'd have to think on that. Anything less than a dream job, and (for me!!) it's not worth it.

But maybe I'm more burned out than you are.


I gave it a ton of thought and from most sims I think I am ok to retire now but since I had already committed to another job and then signed a lease, I am going to give it a try and see if I can do another ~16 months. Partly due to the money already committed and trying to break the lease and also the $1,400 a month in COBRA health insurance is hefty.

A few things I'm also concerned about:
1. High real estate prices
2. Lofty stock market valuations
3. Near zero yield on anything with safety

The combination of those 3 things seems to put financial things at a higher risk than normal times especially with the virus still causing issues and inflation concerns (at least near term).

It is possible I will go back, hate it and quit and then cost me more money but at the same time I'll be earning a solid paycheck for a few months to help recoup some of the expenses. If I hadn't hated my current job, the smartest decision would have been to ride it out longer.

Usually I can grind things out.

My recent team lead told me a while ago "You always whine about stuff but then you always get it all done." I think that is valid. I don't like wasting time or seeing people doing stupid stuff but if I'm doing something, I don't like not getting it done efficiently and accurately.

I think once my wife moves out to be wife me that will help. Now that I'm married it helps to have someone around. When I lost my long time friend last year it was painful and when she wasn't around it was tough (at that time we weren't married and she was still taking care of her mom part time).

This is one of the decisions I really wish I could do both ways and see how things turn out. Sadly no rewinds in life.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Well said, Richard.

I'm reminded of the book "The Peter Principle" from about forty years ago. It taught that the best at whatever they do tend to get promoted to the next level. That continues until they reach a job level they can no longer do well. Then they spend the rest of their career in misery because they are no longer promotable.

Its wonderful working for good people and doing work you enjoy, but many get stuck in slots that are little more than a paycheck to pay the bills.

Yes, a regular investing program started early does give you more options. That includes early retirement but also starting your own business or consultancy or pursuing your dreams.

Maintaining contacts in your field can be useful if later you need funds. Consulting, contract work, teaching at a university, and much volunteer work are all possible in the future.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
I guess the point here is to keep your job options and skills up to date, and try to avoid the "retired in place" scenario which I see too often where people are literally counting down the years to retirement.
-------------------------------
I'd point out that being "retired in place" is not the same as counting down the years (or days!) to retirement. If you're still working hard, that's not the same as "retired in place", which to me means just going through the motions.

I worked hard, up to and including my last day on the job. Was I counting down the days? You bet. Heck, I gave them notice of my retirement five years in advance. And a more pointed reminder about ten months in advance.

Keeping your job skills up is always a good idea, and I try to do that even after retirement. But in many businesses, some being worse than others, age discrimination is rampant, but hard to do anything about. So job mobility isn't always as easy as it should be.

In your case Rich, you're lucky. You're going back to a govt.-type job, so that's less of a problem. It could be harder in the private sector.

Bill
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Congrats on both the new marriage and attaining FI. Hope the move goes well.

IP
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
I'm still contemplating bagging the whole thing and just retiring and buying a less expensive home.

Unfortunately I found out my father is now being diagnosed with congestive heart failure. Not sure of the details but definitely not good news.

Enjoy what you got because once it goes, it can go quickly (at least the ability to do things w/o substantial issues).

Have a nice weekend!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
Unfortunately I found out my father is now being diagnosed with congestive heart failure.

So sorry to hear that Rich. If I might suggest this board: https://boards.fool.com/taking-care-of-parents-116503.aspx?m... Very helpful finding answers to questions or just simply posing questions with no answers. Certainly helped me keep what was left of my sanity when I helped Sis deal with our aging parents.

Enjoy what you got because once it goes, it can go quickly...

It's impressive how very instantly we can go from middle aged to OLD.

Stress upon stress for you right now, and even though some of those stresses are considered positive, (marriage, new job or potentially retirement,) it's tough on your body. Take care of yourself too.

IP
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 8
I don't know your finances, but if you are able I would say to do exactly that. Chuck it all and retire. Then you can downsize your house, spend whatever time is left with your father, and pretty much do as you please.

As you said, once it goes, it can go quickly. Don't waste it on work if you don't have to.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Sometimes trying to coordinate a bunch of stuff is challenging and exciting but obviously stressful. And sometimes you just wonder about people and family.

I'm trying to get a car shipped and have it arrived prior to starting a new job so I don't have to deal with rentals and also if it doesn't arrive before I start working, then it will be tough for me to get it delivered since you need to be available most of the day.

I traded emails with a relative 3 times this week to coordinate them accepting the car and was going to send them money to pay the delivery guy. Today I get an email from them saying "Oh, didn't we tell you we aren't going to be around next week?". Uh, no you didn't.

Thanks for the comments. Retirement does look easier/better by the day.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
Obviously it's entirely up to you, and what you want.

Just from the bit you've described I would already be saying "screw it, I'm done".

Maybe if it was a dream job that I might want to do for a few more years. Like Goddard Space Flight Center. And even then, given the hassles you've described, I'd have to think on that. Anything less than a dream job, and (for me!!) it's not worth it.

But maybe I'm more burned out than you are.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Obviously it's entirely up to you, and what you want.

Just from the bit you've described I would already be saying "screw it, I'm done".

Maybe if it was a dream job that I might want to do for a few more years. Like Goddard Space Flight Center. And even then, given the hassles you've described, I'd have to think on that. Anything less than a dream job, and (for me!!) it's not worth it.

But maybe I'm more burned out than you are.


I gave it a ton of thought and from most sims I think I am ok to retire now but since I had already committed to another job and then signed a lease, I am going to give it a try and see if I can do another ~16 months. Partly due to the money already committed and trying to break the lease and also the $1,400 a month in COBRA health insurance is hefty.

A few things I'm also concerned about:
1. High real estate prices
2. Lofty stock market valuations
3. Near zero yield on anything with safety

The combination of those 3 things seems to put financial things at a higher risk than normal times especially with the virus still causing issues and inflation concerns (at least near term).

It is possible I will go back, hate it and quit and then cost me more money but at the same time I'll be earning a solid paycheck for a few months to help recoup some of the expenses. If I hadn't hated my current job, the smartest decision would have been to ride it out longer.

Usually I can grind things out.

My recent team lead told me a while ago "You always whine about stuff but then you always get it all done." I think that is valid. I don't like wasting time or seeing people doing stupid stuff but if I'm doing something, I don't like not getting it done efficiently and accurately.

I think once my wife moves out to be wife me that will help. Now that I'm married it helps to have someone around. When I lost my long time friend last year it was painful and when she wasn't around it was tough (at that time we weren't married and she was still taking care of her mom part time).

This is one of the decisions I really wish I could do both ways and see how things turn out. Sadly no rewinds in life.
Print the post Back To Top